Job Searching Past Retirement Age

Changing careers isn’t easy

You’ve worked for one company for the better part of a decade and were laid off yesterday.

Now it’s time to look for a new job. Competition is fierce, so you’re happy to accept a lower ranking position if need be.

Age is only a number, and you know that your experience is valuable. How do you show that to interviewers?

Stay Up to Date with New Technologies

Employers expect recent grads to be knowledgeable on the latest technologies. You must prove you’re just as tech-savvy. You’ll need to know your way around a computer, have an idea of how to use the Microsoft Office suite, Google documents, and email. Acquaint yourself with the major social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn), and create accounts to prove you understand how they work.

Research any specific technologies or methods popular in your industry and become familiar with those tools as well. Don’t be afraid of taking online or in-person classes to stay informed. Be aware of how to access email on your mobile phone or tablet.

Leverage Your Experience but Be Willing to Learn

Employers sometimes equate youth and lack of experience to a willingness to learn. You need to prove that you are just as hungry for new knowledge and experiences.

However, you also must leverage your experience to beat the competition. This is a fine line to walk. Show you already know quite a bit, but are willing to learn even more.

To prove your experience, come to the interview prepared with several specific examples of your knowledge. You’ve been in the industry for years, and have seen both lean and prosperous times. You know how to prepare for those eventualities. Let a potential employer know you are willing to share this knowledge with others, so they will be prepared for whatever the future might bring.

To prove a willingness to learn, speak about what you want to do with your career. Why do you want this job? Where do you see yourself in a few years? What in your past proves you’re a curious person ready to learn new things?

Utilize Your Network

If you’ve been in the industry for a while, you’ve probably made a few contacts. Contact friends or previous co-workers to see what they are doing and what positions they are hiring for. Provide as much information as possible to show that you’re a serious candidate, not a desperate job seeker. A personal relationship can go a long way in getting a job.

Have you had to compete with younger candidates in the job search? Let us know how it went in the comments below!

 

 

 

Poll Results: Achieving Your Career Dreams in 2018

Last month we conducted a Movin’ On Up poll asking readers which part of their career they plan to focus on this year. Check out the results below!

Getting Hired

Just over 18% of respondents indicated they want to get hired in 2018. How do you get the job? Hard work and dedication.

If you are not currently employed, the job search should become your new full-time job. First, create a career development plan to organize your thoughts about the job search and where you want your career to go. Next, update your resume. Then, contact anyone in your network who might be able to help. Attend professional groups in your area that are related to your industry.

Once you prepare all your tools and leverage your network, start the job search. Remember, you are one of many applicants. Your goal is to stand out above the rest. When you have interviews, ask pertinent questions to show interest. Do your research and know who the company is and what they stand for. Find out how you fit into the company culture. After the interview, write a handwritten thank you note. Not everyone does, and it makes you stand out.

Getting a Raise

Coming in second place with 17% of the vote was aiming to get a raise.

The hardest part of getting a raise you feel you deserve is figuring out when and how to ask for one. To eliminate the ‘when’ part of that equation, think about a raise the second you walk in the door. Set goals and track your progress toward those goals. Have metrics handy. Once you’ve met your major goals (and made sure the company isn’t floundering and the economy isn’t spiraling), ask. Odds are, given your incredible work history, your boss expects you to pop the question anyway.

And as for the how? Be confident. Know what you want, and have a presentation planned that shows why you deserve it. Be kind and smile, but also get your point across. Bring visual aids that prove your success.

Updating My Resume

Coming in third with 16% of the vote, “Updating My Resume” was another top choice.

Everything starts with your resume. Do the words on the page paint an accurate picture of your experiences as they apply to the specific position and company you’re applying for? If not, it’s time to make some adjustments.

Focus on meaningful accomplishments rather than a list of what you did. How did you benefit the company? Did you increase ROI? Cause a surge in viewers? Free up time in your managers schedule so they could make their deadline? If you don’t have any relevant experience, share your accomplishments and how they apply to the position.

The Rest

“Getting a promotion” came in fourth with just under 14% of the vote, while “More interviews,” “Quitting my job,” and “Other” all tied for fifth with 9.5% of the vote. “Updating my cover letter” rounded out the group with just over 6% of the vote. “Other” included responses such as “Improving my results in total,” “Gracefully retiring,” and “Training.”

Anything else you plan to accomplish in 2018? How do you plan on doing it? Let us know in the comments section below!

On the Job: From Hired to Retired—Season 2 Episode 1

Featuring stories about the pursuit of work

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Movin’ On Up is proud to announce season two of the On the Job podcast series, brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Jobs give us a connection to our communities and the ability to provide for ourselves and our families. Your work may be your passion or it could just be the way you make ends meet. Each week, On the Job will share stories about the pursuit of work by delving into the employment situations people from all walks of life face each day.

The Second Act: From Dentist in China to LA Musician

Mr. Song left his home in China and moved to Los Angeles after his wife passed away. He had plans to continue practicing his lifelong career of dentistry, but when things didn’t work out quite as he had planned, Mr. Song decided to switch gears, bringing the traditional Chinese folk instrument, the erhu, to America.

Don’t miss an episode!
Download the On the Job podcast on iTunes or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts.
And, be sure to check back next week for Episode 2.2!

Be sure to subscribe to our RSS feed – powered by Express Employment Professionals!

 

The New Look of Temporary Work

There’s been a huge shift in the way companies do business today as staffing services have become a more important part of business and hiring strategies. Since the great recession, U.S. staffing firms have created more jobs than any other industry and are expected to grow faster and add more new jobs in the next decade, according to American Staffing Association (ASA). Business owners are increasingly using temporary and contract staffing  to help them quickly react to changing market conditions.

This change in hiring preference can be seen in data from Express Employment Professionals, who conducted a survey of 665 employers throughout the U.S. and Canada and found that many planned on adding temporary workers in the third quarter, especially in the commercial and light industrial sectors.

Should You Consider Temporary Work?

Staffing agencies are allowing businesses the flexibility to expand and decrease their workforce to meet demand. Like employers, workers are also seeing the benefits of flexible employment. According to a recent story by National Public Radio, temporary employment is a good way to get your foot in the door with a company. Contingent workers also have the freedom to travel and work in different fields. Working on a temporary basis for different employers allows you an opportunity to increase your skill set, network, and have flexibility in your work life. Because of this freedom, more workers are using temporary work to stay effective in their specific fields. By working in different environments, social settings and businesses, workers have to adapt their specific skills and training to fit in the ever-changing company cultures. This is one reason temporary workers are becoming more effective and experienced in the workplace.

Another trend in this industry is that staffing employees are working for firms longer than ever before. The staffing industry has lately seen an increase in tenure compared to previous years. While employers watch for signs of growth, they are keeping contract workers for extended periods. Workers are seeing this as a great way to potentially be hired on full time with companies later. A recent study by ASA found that when the economy is growing at a normal rate, 53% of staffing employees who remain in the workforce bridge to full-time employment. This is why temporary work could be a great choice for you. It provides you with more opportunities while giving employers a first-hand look at your potential to do well in a company.

In the next 10 years, the U.S. staffing industry is expected to grow faster and add more new jobs than nearly any other industry, according to ASA. And to solidify its proper place, the BLS believes the demand for temporary help will generate a significant amount of employment growth during this next decade. The staffing industry is growing and becoming a more vital aspect of the business environment, and temporary workers are on the front end leading the change.

Have you ever tried temporary work? Let us know in the comments section below!

 

Poll: What Part of the Job Interview Process Do You Need Help With?

Here at Movin’ On Up, it’s our goal to help you find a job and career you’ll love. Accomplishing that means acing your interviews.

Is there any part of the interview process you’d like help with? Something you’ve always wanted to know but never had an opportunity to ask? Now’s your chance!

Let us know about any topics you’d like to hear about, and we’ll feature the most topics responses in a future blog post.

Let us know by voting in our poll!

Is Your Relationship with Your Boss on the Rocks?

Group projects don’t end after high school. As adults, we call it work. Karen grew up, and now she’s a department manager.  Like Jerry, some coworkers are undependable. And like Karen, some managers are less than great. It gets even harder to perform well when you suspect your manager might have it out for you.

But how can you really know whether your manager has a problem with you?

They Micromanage You

Maybe it’s constantly checking in on you or scheduling private meetings every day. They don’t seem to believe you when you say you have a deadline covered. Whatever it is, they’re not doing it to anybody else on the team. And that’s a problem.

You’ll probably never really know the reason. Maybe you made a bad impression on your first day, or the last person to hold the position was a friend of your boss. It could even be something in your background or social history.

How do you fix that? By doing a self-analysis. Look at your accomplishments and behavior. Check your career development plan. Are you doing anything offensive or untoward? Did your boss previously approach you about a performance problem you still haven’t dealt with?

If you can’t find anything, politely approach your boss about it. Ask them if there’s anything you’re doing wrong. Note specifically how you are being treated differently.

They’re Short with You

If your boss doesn’t make any effort to engage with you, something is wrong. You try to ask for their assistance on a project and they only give yes or no answers.

For whatever reason, they don’t want to talk to you. Maybe they don’t find your work satisfactory or don’t see you as worth their time.

As soon as you can, engage in a conversation. Don’t let it fester. Ask them why it is they refuse to engage with you. It could be because they expect you to handle your responsibilities on your own, or it could be a personal issue. You won’t know unless you ask.

They Don’t Give You Credit for Your Work

If you’re doing your job well, you can expect to be given more responsibilities. That’s how you move up in your career. However, a boss that has less than friendly feelings for you might be tempted to take credit for your accomplishments.

Start to take note of your accomplishments; write down how you achieved or completed projects. Bring this information to your manager, and let them know that you are proud of your work and would like to be recognized for it. If they listen to you and you’re able to work with them, great!

However, if your boss refuses to listen to what you have to say, regardless of reason, you may need to go to their manager and let them know about the situation. If the situation still doesn’t improve, it may be time to start looking for a new job with a great boss. 

Have you ever had trouble with a bad boss? How did you handle the situation? Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

Interviews and Your Personality Type

Are you an introvert or an extrovert?

We’ve all heard it before. Be assertive and social in an interview. Show that you want the job and are easy to talk to. You want to show how great it would be to work with you, and how valuable your sense of teamwork is.

However, what do you do if you’re an introvert? You would love to come off as talkative and social, but that’s just not who you are.

It turns out that your personality type heavily affects how you approach an interview. You want to cater to your strengths and cover your weaknesses. As such, introverts and extroverts both need to approach interviews differently.

Introverts

An introvert, per the Merriam-Webster dictionary, is “one whose personality is characterized by introversion; broadly: a reserved or shy person.”

An introvert doesn’t hate people—he or she just doesn’t enjoy being the center of attention. Introverts recharge their batteries by being alone, and sometimes can only handle social situations for a short amount of time.

How are you supposed to act in an interview? By focusing on your goals and preparing. Most introverts are critical thinkers—they spend more time alone, and thus more time in their own mind. Use this time to anticipate all the questions an interviewer might ask, and to develop an action plan. If improvising in the moment isn’t your strength, simply prepare a suitable response for every possible situation.

In the actual interview, rely on your preparation. If a question comes up you didn’t prepare for, don’t be afraid to ask for a moment to reflect on the question. An interview is not a race—you don’t have to answer as quickly as possible to show you’re the right person for the job.

Extroverts

Merriam-Webster notes that an extrovert is “one whose personality is characterized by extroversion; broadly: a gregarious and unreserved person.” So, someone who likes to talk, and isn’t afraid to state their opinion. Although it might seem like interviews would be a breeze for people like this, that’s not always the case.

Extroverted applicants need to be especially wary of oversharing or taking over the interview. Your answer to a question should never exceed three minutes. When asked about your overall experience and interest in the job, have a prepared speech planned. Standard questions (where do you see yourself in (blank) years, tell me about a time….), should be answered in 90 seconds or less.

Be aware of body language and the personality type of your interviewer. If your answers and their questions are flowing rhythmically, you’re probably dealing with another extrovert. That’s more in your wheelhouse. However, if they’re taking a bit of time to process your answers and taking detailed notes, you might be dealing with an introvert. Take that to heart, and consider your words more carefully. Speak slowly and succinctly. Give them time to process what you’re saying. Know when to speak, and when not to.

It’s important to note that your personality type lies on a spectrum. Some people are extroverted introverts, while others are introverted extroverts. Know yourself, and adapt your own unique personality to the interview process.

How has your personality type affected your interview style? Let us know in the comments below!