Career Advancement

4 Tips New Managers Need to Know to Succeed

Your first managerial position can be both exciting and nerve-wracking. You want to show your company that you were the right choice for this promotion, but sometimes it can be hard to figure out where to start.

You may face some growing pains when you get started, so the key thing to remember is that you’re new to this management thing. It’s okay to take time to adjust to the role. Here are a few things to keep in mind.

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Certifications to Boost Your Resume

Trying to get a leg up on the career ladder is challenging no matter your experience level, and with competition around every corner, making your resume stand out above the rest can prove difficult. One way to give your skill set a boost, as well as your resume, is to earn certifications relevant to your career field. To help determine what certifications might be right for you, here are a list of popular certifications organized by career field.

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Keep This in Mind Before Turning Your Passion into a Job

It isn’t impossible, but you have to be prepared.

Maybe you love to brew coffee. Perhaps embroidery is your favorite thing. It’s even possible you want to dedicate your life to raising alpacas.

Whatever your passion, if it results in a product or service, there’s someone out there making a living off it.

However, before you quit your job to paint or to open your own clothing boutique, there are a few things to keep in mind.

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Should You Move Out of State for a Better Job?

Is it Worth It?

You like where you live. Maybe you’ve already bought a house and your kids are enrolled in a great school. But you don’t like your job, the people you work with, your boss, or some combination of all three. You could also use a pay raise.

You’ve tried searching for a different job locally, but nothing seems right. But then you hear about a great job opportunity. The problem? It’s in a totally different state.

It can be hard to decide if a new job is worth moving for. Here are a few things to keep in mind before accepting that out-of-state job offer.

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Poll Question: How Much Influence Did Your Parent(s) /Guardian(s) Have on Your Career Path?

Have you ever said or done something and realized that you’re slowly morphing into your parents or guardians?

It happens. But that doesn’t mean you’re a direct copy. For this month’s poll, we’re trying to see what type of influence your parents or guardians had on your career. Maybe your dad was a police officer and you enrolled in the academy to follow in his footsteps. Or perhaps your mother was a nurse but you pretty much faint at the sight of blood and never considered that as an option.

Some take over the family business or go to college at their parent’s insistence. Others rebel, choosing career paths that make sense to them but are hard for their parents to understand.

Whatever your situation, we want to hear about it. Let us know your thoughts in our poll!

The Highest Paying Trade School Jobs

Have you considered trade schools?

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again—the traditional four-year college experience isn’t for everyone. If you love to work with your hands, why not consider trade school instead?

Also known as technical, career, or vocational school, a trade school is defined by PrepScholar as “a post-secondary institution that’s designed to give students the technical skills to prepare them for a specific occupation.” They frequently offer two-year programs and cost much less than the traditional four-year college experience.

Trade schools are open to all students with high-school diplomas or GEDs, regardless of age. This makes them a perfect option for both fresh high-school grads or those looking to make a career change later in life.

But what about career options? Is it possible to make a good amount of money with a trade school degree? Yes it is. And here are some options to prove it, courtesy of Trade-Schools.net and the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Dental Hygienist

  • Median pay—$72,910
  • Top pay—$100,170 or more
  • Job growth—20%

Dental hygienists clean teeth. They keep an eye out for tooth or gum problems and support the dentist in several ways, including taking notes and data input. They’re also available to answer general dental health questions.

Electrician

  • Median pay—$52,720
  • Top pay—$90,420 or more
  • Job growth—9%

Electricians are unsurprisingly the experts of all things electrical. This means installing, maintaining, and fixing electrical wiring, equipment, and fixtures in buildings. They can work in homes, businesses, warehouses, and anywhere else with electrical wiring. Some jobs can be outdoor, while others are indoor.

Heavy Equipment Operator

  • Median pay—$45,890
  • Top pay—$80,200 or more
  • Job growth—12%

Heavy equipment operators, also known as construction equipment operators, drive or operate heavy machinery. If you’ve ever wanted to embrace your childhood dreams of driving heavy construction vehicles, you might consider this position.

Equipment used includes excavators, wrecking balls, and all sorts of other hulking vehicles. They use this equipment to build everything from roads and bridges to buildings and more.

Licensed Practical or Vocational Nurse

  • Median pay—$44,090
  • Top pay—$60,420 or more
  • Job growth—12%

If you care for others and want to help them stay healthy, consider a job in nursing. A licensed practical or vocational nurse does not need a degree.

These nurses provide basic care while working under registered nurses and doctors. Job environments can vary, from nursing homes and hospitals to physician’s offices and even private homes.

Looking for further information on other job types? Check out our Job Spotlight blog series.

Do you have one of these jobs? Are you interested in one? Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

Poll Results: Are You Over or Underemployed?

Last month we conducted a Movin’ On Up poll asking whether readers believed they were over or underemployed. A resounding 85% said they are underemployed.

Only 9% said they were well-suited for their job, while 4% said they were over-employed.

It can be hard to keep going at a job where you’re underemployed. You aren’t given a chance to use your skills or show people what you can do. However, you should still try to do your job as best as possible, even in these circumstances.

Why? For one thing, it’s better than the alternative—being unemployed. It’s always harder to find a job when you don’t currently have one. Additionally, you never know what kinds of opportunities could arise when you really give it your all. You might get a promotion or take advantage of a chance to move to a different department.

In addition, you can build skills and network. As long as you find a way to keep learning, that’s experience you can use in your next job. Contacts you meet in this position (whether at your current company or with employees from other companies) could be valuable in your future job search.

At the end of the day, if a job makes you absolutely miserable, you need to move on. However, before you do, make sure that you learn everything you can from that job. Learn as much as possible, meet new faces, and pair all of that effort with a renewed focus on your job search.

How have you dealt with being underemployed? Let us know in the comments below!