Leadership

Leading a Team During Organizational Change

One of the most difficult times a leader faces during the course of a career is dealing with change within an organization. From company mergers and account closings to employment shifts and adopting hybrid workforce solutions, leading a team through the uncertainty of change and company transformation can be challenging. However, leaders can expect at one time or another, they will have to face change head on.

According to a study by Garter, organizations have averaged five major companywide changes in the past three years, and surprisingly, not including changes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, 75% of companies expect major change initiatives to increase in the near future. With change affecting organizations across North America, leaders will have to embrace a few techniques to ensure successful transitions for their teams. (more…)

Leaders: Four Things to Do Today to Ensure a Successful New Year

The new year is just around the corner, and with it comes newly realized optimism and strong goal-oriented determination. But to ensure your team is successful in the new year, it’s imperative to focus on the right things that will have positive impacts on your workplace objectives. Check out these four things to do today to ensure a successful new year!

Create Realistic Goals

When creating plans for the new year, one of the best things you can do is create ambitious, but realistic goals. According to a study from the University of Scranton, 92% of people fail to achieve their goals for the new year. That doesn’t create good odds for success. However, there’s a simple way to beat the odds: follow the S.M.A.R.T. goal-making plan. Make sure your goals are specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time sensitive. (more…)

What To Do When Your Boss is Laid Off

Your world just got shaken up; how do you handle it?

You walk into work as usual, but your boss isn’t there. You figure they’re at a doctor’s appointment, or maybe they had to bring their kid to school, so you go about your day like any other day. But they never show up. Eventually your boss’ boss calls you in for a discussion, and that’s when you find out they’ve been let go.

Maybe they did something wrong, or maybe it was a mutual decision. Regardless of the reason, your job is in for some major changes, at least in the short term, and probably a new boss.

What questions should you ask yourself? What does this mean for your job? Take a deep breath and review these tips.

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Being Promoted to Your Boss’s Level

Congratulations! You make more money and things are awkward.

You work incredibly hard, and truly care about your company. When a big management position opens up, you’re ready for it and submit your resume. You ace the interview (perhaps thanks in part to our handy tips), and now you’re a manager!

There’s only one problem: that means your previous boss is now just a regular co-worker. How do you act? What can you say? Is it all right to ask them to meet deadlines?

Here are our tips on turning a former boss into a colleague.

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Diversity vs. Inclusion and Why They Matter

Do you know the difference?

Current work philosophy dictates the best possible team is one chock-full of varying viewpoints, personalities, and skills. Differences in opinion and beliefs result in more stimulating brainstorming sessions and a higher degree of innovation overall.

Many employers are starting to embrace “diverse” workplaces with employees coming from a wide range of walks of life.

But HR folks still say that this “diversity” is not enough. There needs to be inclusion as well, but this can be a difficult concept for employees to understand. What’s the difference anyway?

Here’s the difference between diversity and inclusion, and why both are important to have in any workplace. (more…)

Mentoring 101: Finding the Right Fit is Key to Successful Relationships

Mentorships are a time-honored tradition in the workforce. From entry-level recent graduates to mid-career professionals making a move toward the C-suite, there’s an opportunity to take an employee’s training and development to the next level through mentorship relationships.

And the statistics show mentors can have a major impact on not just the mentee’s success, but also on the productivity of a business overall.

According to the 2016 Deloitte Millennial Survey, younger employees intending to stay with their organization more than five years are twice as likely to have a mentor. And, 71 percent of those likely to leave in the next two years are unhappy with how their leadership skills are being developed.

So, there’s little doubt that a strong culture of mentorship is important for building a productive and engaged workforce.

But before you jump headfirst into a mentor relationship with a bright, up-and-coming employee, there are a few considerations you should make to ensure the relationship is productive for everyone involved.

What can you offer vs. what does your mentee need?
First and foremost, is the relationship even a good fit? There’s much more to it than simply pairing a senior leader with a younger employee. Before any official relationship is established, there should be discussions about what the mentee’s goals are and what the mentor is willing and able to provide.

Forcing a poor fit will likely be a waste of time for both parties in the long run. Mentorships are first and foremost a relationship. And if either the mentor or the mentee are not getting what they need out of the arrangement, it’s best to be open and honest about the situation and to help each other find a better fit.

Is the mentee ready to learn?
There’s a saying that success is where preparation and opportunity meet. Even if you sense potential in a young employee, if they are not prepared to take the next step and make a commitment to a mentorship relationship, you shouldn’t try to rush it.

Again, this is where communication about what the mentor and mentee expect to gain out of the relationship plays a major role. If a mentor feels their potential mentee is not ready to fully engage in the process, it may be more beneficial to put the plan on hold until they are.

What can you learn from the mentee?
Mentorships aren’t a one-way street. No matter how experienced a mentor may be, there’s always something new to learn—and those lessons may very well come from their mentee. The best relationships are an exchange of knowledge where both parties benefit from the experience.

A millennial mentee, for example, may be able to teach a baby boomer mentor about the most current trends in social media or other communications technologies. Being blind to rank and open to learning new skills or taking advantage of each other’s unique expertise is key to a mutually beneficial relationship.

Mentorships take many forms and in the end, it’s up to the individuals involved to find the right fit for their development needs. Communication, setting expectations, and a willingness to learn are some of the most important characteristics of any great work relationship, and essential to successfully mentoring the next generation of leaders.

 

What Type of Boss Do You Have?

And what does that mean for you, as an employee?

Throughout our lives, we’ve all worked for a variety of bosses. Some are compassionate and inspire us to excel in a number of ways. Others are independent leaders who have a tendency to be more assertive.

Daniel Goleman, of the Harvard Business School Press, outlines six basic boss types, illustrated below in an infographic by the Quid Corner, an online financial resource center. Although we all have our own ideal management type, the graphic also outlines the optimal ways to get along with each type of boss. So even if your manager isn’t naturally compatible with you, you’ll have some idea of how best to get along with them.