Workplace Relationships

Getting the Most Out Manager Feedback

Keeping a line of communication open with your manager is critical to success in the workplace. Having a conversation with your boss about your job performance can be nerve-racking, but it doesn’t have to be. Here are three strategies for getting the most out of your manager’s feedback.

Be Open to Feedback

Meeting with your manager for feedback is necessary whether you’re new to your job or have been there for a while. Welcoming feedback can demonstrate your willingness to grow in areas where you need to improve, correct, or strengthen your job effectiveness. Prepare for your meeting with the idea that you won’t only get a glowing report on your performance.

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The Managerial Minute: Maintaining Structure with a Flexible Workforce

The workplace is changing. No longer do you see the majority of businesses confining employees to an 8-to-5, brick-and-mortar office space. Now, more companies are opting for remote, work-from-home options and flexible schedules. If the global pandemic caused by the COVID-19 virus taught business leaders anything it’s this—maintaining productivity is more about the what, not the where. During the past year, many employers were forced to move their workforces to a remote solution to regulate social distancing protocols and health-related restrictions. During this time, businesses received first-hand knowledge on the efficacy of remote work. And with 52% of companies saying their workforce is more productive while working remotely, according to a PwC study, it looks like the remote work option in some form is likely here to stay.

With the shift in the way we do business, many new challenges come, including maintaining structure with the new normal. The most recent change leaders have seen is the proliferation of the hybrid workforce. This is the consolidation of workers in one organization who work in different capacities, including an in-office staff, remote workforce, semi-work-from-home solutions, flexible hours, etc. In the past, leaders focused on one specific type of workplace situation. In today’s modern office, businesses are managing multiple employee conditions. To ensure a productive workforce that maintains morale, engagement, and overall structure, consider these solutions. (more…)

Working with an Unempathetic Boss

An unempathetic boss is one lacking in emotional intelligence. What’s emotional intelligence? As defined by Psychology Today, the term “refers to the ability to identify and manage one’s own emotions, as well as the emotions of others.” Essentially, an unempathetic boss doesn’t understand what other people are feeling. Not all unempathetic bosses are the same. Some are excited for their jobs but unable to realize their decisions are wildly unpopular, while others keep to a hands-off approach and expect employees to complete goals regardless of their home situation. In extreme circumstances, this can result in a boss who cares about employee performance over employee wellbeing.

It can be difficult to work with a manager who doesn’t understand their employees, since they may be less than willing to allow employees time to spend with their families or understand how a death in the family or sick relative might affect employee work performance. This can result in a tense work atmosphere. However, there are a few things you can do to cope. (more…)

Defending Yourself Against Workplace Gossip

You’re doing your job, meeting deadlines and quotas, and then your boss asks to see you in their office. You aren’t expecting anything out of the ordinary; maybe this is to discuss a new project or a new addition to the team. But something seems off. Your boss doesn’t look happy, and the first words out of their mouth are “There’s been talk around the office that you’ve been…” And things only go downhill from there. (more…)

When the Customer ISN’T Always Right

What to do when you’re faced with an angry customer or client

The phrase “The customer is always right” has been used as early as 1905. Quote Insider attributes the saying to the Chicago retailer Marshall Field, although it’s possible he heard it from someone else. The meaning of the phrase is that companies and their employees should treat complaints seriously to avoid customers feeling ignored or cheated.

However, for anyone who has worked in a customer or client facing job, or even just peeked at some of the angrier folks on social media, the customer is in fact NOT always right. Customers should be respected, but when their behavior starts to get out of hand, what can you do to deescalate the situation? (more…)