Safety

Safety Month: Ladder Safety

We’re back with another set of safety tips for National Safety Month.

Does your job involve time spent climbing ladders? Maybe you need to restock product on the top shelf or repair a leaky roof. Whatever your reason, ladders are a necessary tool to get the job done. However, they can also be deadly.

Every year, 500,000 people are treated for ladder-related injuries, and 300 of those incidents end up being fatal. To make sure your name doesn’t end up on that annual list, check out these important safety tips.

[Download a PDF of this poster here]

 

Safety Month: Six Tips That Will Save Your Sight

The weather is heating up and summer is almost here. Yup, it’s already June folks! And that means it’s time to celebrate National Safety Month.

Proper back support, correct lifting techniques, and eye protection tips can get boring. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t worth discussing. Since looking at a few short articles can save you from chronic pain or injury, we think it’s worth it.

Here are our top eye safety tips to ensure you enjoy that annual fireworks show in July.

 

Winter Weather Driving Tips

The first major snowstorm of the season has blown through, and while you may be enjoying the lull between Christmas and New Year’s Day, this week is a great time to prepare to hit the ground running in your job search once the holidays are over.

Job searching around the holidays can be challenging with key players out of the office on vacation, so spend this time strategizing your job search and line up those interviews. Ideally, the weather on the day of your interview will be sunny, about 70 degrees, and no wind to mess up your perfectly styled hair. But Mother Nature often has a mind of her own, and you might find yourself driving to interviews in some slippery conditions.

Before you hit the roads in inclement weather conditions, follow these tips from Volunteer Fireman’s Insurance Services (VFIS) to make sure you get to your interview safely:

winterdrivingtips

Stay Safe This Holiday Season

IBeat the Winter Bluest’s the most wonderful time of the year—unless your holiday is disrupted by a trip to the hospital, a visit from the fire department, or a case of the blues that steals the joy of the season.

How do you keep your holidays as safe as they are festive? Here are five tips to keep in mind.

Talking Turkey
You may be trying out a brand new recipe, roasting your first big turkey, or just so caught up in fun and conversation that you can’t remember how long the roast beast has been sitting out.

To keep food poisoning off your guest list, try these tips from the Food and Drug Administration. In addition, stuffing is a common culprit of food-borne illness, so pay special attention to its temperature, and don’t ever stuff a turkey the night before roasting.

Deep frying a turkey includes different hazards, including fryer related fires, burns, explosions, and even carbon monoxide poisoning. Use these safety tips from the National Safety Council to stay safe.

(Don’t) Keep the Home Fires Burning
According to the National Fire Protection Association, holiday decorations cause 860 home fires each year, and Christmas trees trigger another 210 blazes. Untended candles and fireplaces also increase the risk that your holiday will go up in smoke.

Following these tips from the Electrical Safety Foundation International can help your holidays stay delightful, not frightful.

To Grandmother’s House We (Carefully) Go
Today’s parents are experts at child proofing their own homes, but holiday travel takes babies and children into new environments where toilet seat locks and safety latches are not part of the floor plan.

Even the most child-proofed grandparent’s home may pose a real potential safety risk: poisoning. According to Safe Kids Worldwide, grandparents’ medicines are among the most dangerous causes of childhood poisoning.

If you’re traveling with kids or hosting them, these tips from Poisoning.org can be a big help.

Home for the Holidays
In 2015, more than 100 million travelers hit the road for the holidays, according to AAA, and that number is only expected to increase this year. Here are three tips to remember if you will be driving to join in the season’s festivities:

  • Try traveling a bit earlier or later than the typical holiday travel days. Traveling on the holiday typically means less traffic overall.
  • As you eat, drink, and be merry, make sure you are not impaired before you head out in your car. If needed, call a cab or app-driven ride service.
  • Avoid distractions, such as texting while driving. The government reports that distracted driving results in hundreds of thousands of injuries per year, as well as thousands of fatalities.

Traveling overseas? Check the alerts and warnings advisory put out by the U.S. Department of State and the Government of Canada.

Not Every Spirit is Bright
Despite the joy of the season, many people experience depression or “the blues.” And for Millennials, holiday gatherings can also bring a different kind of stress.

An article in Fortune reports that 70% of this generation experiences social anxiety around the holidays. Some tips for navigating these stressors:

  • Choose gatherings where you feel the highest comfort level.
  • Don’t feel pressure to attend too many parties. A little quiet time can help you stay rested and refreshed.
  • Seek counseling if your holiday social anxiety or depression escalates from discomfort to a serious issue that interferes with your ability to enjoy life. This list of emergency hotlines is good to keep on hand if you, a friend, or family member needs help.

Above all, remember that no holiday is ever perfect. Don’t get stressed out trying to do too much in too little time. You’ll enjoy friends and family more if you’re relaxed and rested.

What are you doing to stay safe this holiday season? Let us know in the comments section below!

Back to School: Driving Safety 101

safety_backtoschool_webWith another school year underway, you may soon notice heavier traffic on your daily commute, along with the enforcement of school zones. Because of this, we thought now would be a good time for a refresher on driver safety to help keep children and other young drivers safe as traffic increases.

Adjust your commute time.
If school has already started in your area, your commute time has likely become longer. Now is the time of year to reevaluate the time it takes you to get to work and make sure you adjust your schedule to reflect any changes. Choosing an appropriate time to leave your home not only gets you out the door before traffic reaches its heaviest point, but it also helps you avoid the pressure to drive faster than you should in order to make it to work on time.

Be aware of school zones.
You should always be aware of school zones and drive under the designated speed limit when you’re traveling through one. But now that school is back in session, your school zone awareness needs to be elevated. When you’re driving through a school zone, make sure you’re especially aware of your surroundings. After coming to a complete stop at stop signs and red lights, accelerate slowly and carefully scan the area while maintaining a slow speed to lessen the chances of an accident involving pedestrians.

Remember to watch for new drivers.
As the school year starts, many new drivers will also be hitting the road on their way to school. Teens typically have less driving experience than other drivers, so use a little extra focus and slower speeds in areas near high schools to avoid driving-related issues. Remember to account for after-school activities that may affect rush hour traffic as well.

Leaving early, being aware of specific areas, and reducing your speed during increased traffic can help all of us on the road get to work and back safely every day.

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