Tag Archives: 2014

Look! Interview Tips

Look_Interview_Tips_Feb2014
Have you ever wondered what goes through the hiring manager’s mind when you’re in an interview? Wouldn’t it be nice to know what they were thinking, what they want to hear from you, or what they want to see on your resume? We asked a few hiring managers to share their insight on interview musts and they shared these top four interview tips.

Have Professionalism
The employer you’re interviewing with has goals to grow and brand a company. It’s important to understand that how you present yourself in your personal life may not match the image of the organization, so remember to put your best foot forward. Dress appropriately for the job for which you are interviewing. If you’re not sure, it’s a good idea to ask the interviewer about the dress code. Additionally, there is so much more to professionalism than just dressing the part. Integrity and a good work ethic are also very important attributes to possess and can take you a long way in the hiring process. So make sure you can show these attributes to your interviewer and be ready to share good examples of those traits.

Have a Typo-Free Resume
Job seekers often trust their own eyes to proof and edit their resumes. If no one else reviews your resume, there could be typos that you missed. Find a friend who is great at spelling and grammar or someone that you respect professionally to review and critique your resume before your job hunt, and especially before an interview. If the interview process boils down to three people with the same qualifications and your resume is the only one with a typo, you’re making it easy for an interviewer to choose another candidate.

Have Interest in the Job and the Company
Jennifer Anderson, the hiring manager and vice president of Marketing and Communications at Express Employment Professionals, said, “Often I ask a job seeker to describe to me the ideal job and more times than not the answers come back with something completely unrelated to the job they are seeking. For example, someone may interview for a Marketing Coordinator’s position, but when they describe the ideal job, they want to be a stay at home mother and work from a home office.” So it’s important for the interviewee to understand not only the qualifications of the job they are applying for but also what it is they really want to do with their life and career.

Have a Commitment for More than One Year
Longevity is one of the top qualities employers look for in new hires. Most employers will spend the first six to nine months training you to do a job. Not only will they have invested their time and shared their knowledge, the company has been paying you a salary during your training period. Do your best to learn all you can during training and commit to making the most of your job for a couple of years. Anderson encourages people to let the interviewer know that you’re reliable, you’ll give it your best, and you plan on sticking with the company to help it grow.

After job searching for what seemed like forever, editing your resume, and applying at numerous businesses, it’s time to prepare for an interview. What are some interview tips you’d like to share with us? Let us know in the comments section below.

Job Search Lessons from 2014 Olympics

Gold_Medal_Feb2014Do you have aspirations of getting a better job or growing your career? Watching the Olympics could help. Every time the Olympic Games roll around, I enjoy watching different athletes from across the world compete, and I anticipate seeing my favorite athletes win gold. This year, that was not the case for one of my favorite sports to watch: snowboarding. But instead of turning off the TV as soon as I realized my favorite snowboarder and two-time gold medalist, Shaun White, wasn’t going to place, I decided to stay tuned in to see who won. Here are some of the lessons I learned.

Get Back Up and Don’t Give Up

It’s a tough fact of life to learn; you don’t always win, no matter how hard you try or how far in advance you prepare. That fact was made evident during the final halfpipe competition in Sochi. While watching the Olympics, I was reminded that no matter how much a professional athlete prepares, they may not win, but that doesn’t mean they give up. Soon after the halfpipe competition was over, Shaun was interviewed and asked what happened. Instead of blaming it on the snow or the conditions, he said he’d be back next time and he was happy for the guys who did well! What a great attitude to have! We can learn so much from that statement itself. Just because you haven’t landed a job or moved up in your company as fast as you’d like, it doesn’t mean you need to give up or stop trying. The agony of defeat is never easy to handle, but getting back up, working hard, and trying again will help improve your skills and chances of getting that new job or promotion you’ve been looking for.

Learn from Your Mistakes

Unfortunately, making mistakes is a normal part of life. Failure even happens to the best of the best. What’s important to learn from Olympic winners and even those who won’t be taking home a medal is that these athletes don’t let mistakes defeat them. In fact, you’ll probably see many of the same athletes in four years at the next Winter Olympics. It’s important to learn from your mistakes, make the corrections that are needed, and use those lessons to help shape your future. If you’ve been looking for a new job for a while or if you’re ready to go to the next level in your current job, take a look back at what has been slowing you down in the past or getting you off track and work to take care of those mistakes so you won’t drag that baggage with you to the next level. Also, seek feedback from co-workers or friends and make necessary changes.

What are some lessons you’ve learned from the Olympics? Share with us in the comments section below!

What to Learn About Quitting from a Super Bowl Commercial

If this Super Bowl commercial was shocking to you, you’re not the only one who felt that way.

While funny, it does bring up an important point about how to quit a job – the wrong way. Not only did she quit her job, she quit in front of millions of people on national television! There are many ways to quit your job with class. Here are some tips on how to quit your job without burning any bridges, embarrassing yourself, or demeaning your employer.

Don’t Burn Bridges

“You may work for that person again,” says Lynne Allen, a career coach who formerly worked in recruiting and staffing at Colgate-Palmolive and Time Inc. Your behavior as you leave a job shapes your colleague’s lasting impression of you. Before you make that final walk out the door, remember whatever you say and do is how you will be remembered. That’s a great reason to think about how you’re going to give your boss the news that you’re quitting. Just remember to not burn any bridges along the way because you never know where they can lead. It’s always important to stay classy.

Always Give a Two Weeks’ Notice

Giving at least a two weeks’ notice is a polite thing to do. It allows your boss to be on the lookout for someone to fill your shoes, and if your replacement is hired within your final two weeks, your boss may ask you to help train them. When the time comes to quit a job, make it one of your professional goals to quit with class.

Take Time to Talk

Quitting can be tough not only for you but for the person receiving the news. So, be sure to schedule a meeting with your boss to give your two weeks’ notice. This will give you time to talk face-to-face about the reasons you’re quitting. Don’t ever just tell your boss to shove it!

Be Prepared to Leave

If you’ve been contemplating leaving your job, but haven’t given your two weeks’ notice yet, you need to be preparing to leave. Clean up your work space and make sure your work is organized. Depending on your boss’ reaction after you give them your two weeks’ notice, they may ask you to leave immediately, so you need to be ready for that response also.

Changing jobs can be exciting, rewarding, and a great step for your career, but breaking up with your employer isn’t something to be taken lightly. What factors do you consider before making a job hop? Share them in the comments section below.

Poll: Why Did You Leave Your Last Job?

MOV_POLL-ICONWith the new year underway, many workers are resolving to get a new job, according to a CareerBuilder survey. In fact one in five people plan to change jobs in 2014. Whether you’re planning to leave your current job or if you’ve already made the move and are searching for a new position, let us know why you left your last job.

While You Wait

Patty Prosser, chair of consulting firm OI Partners, suggests being open to alternative employment opportunities in an improving economy. “There is increased demand for contract, freelance, and part-time work. Position yourself to take advantage of these employment options,” she says.

So since 20% of those with jobs plan to leave for other opportunities, we want to know why you plan to leave or have already left your last job. Let us know by voting in our poll.

Achieving Your Goals in 2014

Achieving_Your_Goalsin2014_Jan2014_webNow that 2014 is in full swing, it’s time to take a good look at your goals for the year. What are you doing to reach your goals this year? Are you working hard and setting a good pace to accomplish your goals and new year’s resolutions or have you already gotten off track? No matter what the case may be, you can still achieve the goals you’ve set to better yourself this year.

Goal setting is needed to succeed in everyday life especially if you’re searching for a job or working to advance your career. Without goals, you’re letting life push you around. It’s never too late to set goals and make positive changes in your life. Here are some tips and easy steps to follow to accomplish your goals in 2014.

Write Them Down
The secret to achieving your goals starts with writing them down. When you have to make decisions being able to see your goals will help you stay focused on what is most important. Make sure to write down your goals and post them around your house and workplace to help keep you focused. Regularly seeing the goals you’ve written will help motivate you to take action and help you become more successful. Try writing your short-term milestones on a poster board or dry erase board, so you can see them every day and check off each goal as you accomplish it.

Take Action
You could write down goals all day long, but until you take action, they amount to nothing; and you could possibly be right back where you are a year from now, still wishing you’d made a difference in your income, found a better job, or changed your eating habits. Writing down your goals is only the beginning. Next, you have to make a move! Be intentional by pursuing your goals daily and taking action to accomplish them.

Stay Positive
Forget the negative and dwell on the positive. Sometimes, you may feel like giving up, but you’ll eventually overcome if you stay positive and keep your eyes on the prize! Just remember every meaningful endeavor, dream, or goal will encounter resistance. Overcome the obstacles by focusing on the positive.

Celebrate Your Accomplishments
When you’re experiencing success, it’s easy to celebrate. But if you’re not seeing results, it’s difficult to see the silver lining. Think about how far you’ve come and what you still need to do to accomplish your goals. Remember to look at the goals you’ve written down. Think of those goals as mile markers on a highway. Don’t turn around if you make a mistake. Keep moving forward and take time to celebrate your accomplishments!

What steps are you taking to accomplish your goals? Share with us in the comments section below.

2014 Hiring Forecast

Job_Market_PRediction_AT_Jan2014_webMost people enter a new year with a positive, hopeful outlook of what the next 12 months will hold for their lives. Unfortunately, that positive attitude is a little more hit-or-miss in regards to what 2014 holds for the job market.
Our recent poll of Movin’ On Up readers found that more than a third believe the market will get worse in 2014, with only 24% feeling tentatively positive and 19% feeling very positive about job growth this year. In contrast to last year’s similar poll of 2013 job market predictions, this year’s results seem to indicate a negative trend. For 2014, positive predictions fell 10% compared to 2013. However, national resources take a different view.

The Big Picture
The Wall Street Journal reports that “absent an economic shock, total jobs finally could surpass their pre-recession peak by mid-2014.” A recent WSJ survey revealed a general feeling of optimism from economists who predict that 198,000 jobs will be added each month. The chief economist of Moody’s Analytics, Mark Zandi, had an even more positive prediction, telling USAToday that he anticipates a monthly job gain of 225,000.

Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder, has a good explanation of why there doesn’t seem to be a consensus on what hiring will look like in 2014, based on the results from CareerBuilder’s Annual Job Forecast. “The general sentiment shared by employers whom CareerBuilder talks to every day is that there will be a better job market in 2014. What we saw in our survey was reluctance from some employers to commit to adding jobs until the outcomes of debt negotiations and other issues affecting economic expansion are clearer.”

What This Means for You
All of this uncertainty isn’t a license for you to give up on your job search this year. If these predictions are accurate, the farther into the year we get, the more companies will begin hiring. CareerBuilder’s survey also showed that 51% of the employer respondents currently had open positions for which they couldn’t find qualified workers. This skills gap can be a great advantage in your job hunt if you take the time to build up your knowledge and experience. Plus, almost half of the employers said they were willing to train employees who lacked the skills required for a position.

Some of the areas associated with the most hiring in 2014 include business development, sales, technology, and operations, according to Forbes. More than 25% of those employers surveyed by CareerBuilder reported they plan to create new jobs this year in science, technology, engineering, and math, with the biggest salary increases associated with sales and IT.

Whether you’re expecting good things or bad things from the job market over the next 12 months, don’t let your feelings or predictions affect your own personal job hunt. Take charge of your situation, get your name out there, and do what it takes to make yourself a desirable employee. At the end of the day, most employers are always looking for quality, hard-working people to add to their teams.
Do you have any specific predictions about this year’s job market? What do you do to make yourself a top candidate and increase the likelihood of getting hired? Please share your thoughts with the rest of us in the comments section below!

Poll Summary Results: Job Market Predictions for 2014

Poll_Results_Jan2014In a recent poll, we asked what your job market predictions for 2014 were. The results show a majority of people aren’t very optimistic about the job market in 2014, but others are remaining hopeful that things will look up.  Compared to the job market predictions of voters in 2013, there has been a slight positive change.

More than 36% of voters believe things will get worse before they get better, followed by 24% of people who are willing to take a risk and say they’re contemplating testing the waters to see what else is out there in the job market which is up 6% from 2013.

Coming in third, with 19% of the votes, are those believing they’ll see a promotion in their near future.
Another 13% of people moved from “staying put” to “testing job market water” in 2014 which is down 7% from last year. And 8% of the votes were for “other.”

The Up and Up
Regardless if you are optimistic and willing to take risks or if you’re not so hopeful about the job market in 2014, make each day count. You may not be able to predict your future, but you can work hard each day and help shape it.
For more insight on the job market or advice on your job search, check out these articles:
•    Use Networking Opportunities to Your Advantage
•    The Three Best Hard Skills to Have
•    Facebook and the Job Search
•    Job Search Success Simplified