Tag Archives: careers

3 Times When a Functional Resume is Your Best Bet

Let’s face it, if everyone could get a foot in the door and personally introduce themselves to the employer they want to work for, then everyone would have the job of their dreams. Unfortunately it doesn’t work that way. So what can we rely on to incite interest from hiring managers and get ahead of the competition?

The answer is – a resume. This document has been known to make or break your chances at landing that job you desire. It’s often your first impression and the emissary that chronicles your work history and skills. But there is more than just one style of resume. The key to finding the right one is to figure out what compliments your work history and skill set. If you want to really flex the skills you have acquired then a functional resume is the right format for you. Below are three reasons to choose function over form.

  1. When You’re New to the Job Market
    College grads typically have little to no experience in the field of their studies. A functional resume allows you to show off what you know, what you’ve learned, and show that you have the know-how to get the job done. Remember to tailor the skills on your resume for each employer. Different aspects of your diversity or knowledge may be beneficial to some and not to others.
  2. When You Have Gaps in Your Work History
    Sometimes gaps in our work history are out of our control, and without an explanation they may give the wrong impression of your work ethic, or the appearance of a “job hopper.” Many companies may see the value in your experience but may not want to invest time and money to train you only to have you leave months later. A functional resume takes the focus off of when and where, and places it on the value you received from your time there.
  3. When You Don’t Have Relevant Work Experience
    Not all past experience will relate to the job you want. If you’re looking at beginning an advertising career, your accounting experience is probably not going to sell your creative side. A functional resume allows you to focus on the soft and hard skills that are more related to the position you want.

A functional resume may not be for everyone. If you don’t know what is best for you, look at your work history and put yourself in employers’ shoes. If your skills are valuable to the position but your years of unrelated employment aren’t, a functional resume is the way to go. Have any tips on how the functional format helped you land a job? Tell us in the comments section below.

Infographic: Job Jumps and Career Changes

The millennial generation was born, raised, and influenced by technology.

Just as quickly as technology changes and evolves, the focus of millennials also changes as new information and opportunities are continually made available to them.  And, according to Forbes, they’re the same way in their careers.

Check out this infographic from Notre Dame Online outlining the millennial mindset of the workplace and the nature of their work ethic. This information can help millennials research their next career move before making costly career leaps. And even if you’re not from Generation Y, you can learn how they think and what’s important to them so you can learn to build better working relationships with your millennial co-workers.

Do you agree with the infographic’s depiction of the millennial generation? Let us know in the comment section below.

Millennial Job Hoppers

Save Money by Thrift Store Shopping For What to Wear For a Job Interview

Interview AttireWhen it comes to finding appropriate professional attire for a job interview, the cost of what you need could be a challenge. Shopping online or in person at malls and suit stores can rack up the dollar signs and quickly go beyond most moderate budgets.

Luckily, that doesn’t have to be an issue. In a news segment from Triad Area North Carolina news station Fox 8, fashion designer and motivational speaker Craig Stokes gave an overview of classic job interview attire and how he was able to find a professional wardrobe in a thrift store for less than $20.

Depending on your area, you might not be able to find perfectly fitted attire at your local thrift store. But if you consider some of his advice, you might be able to save a pretty penny for your next job interview while still looking fashionable and professional.

The 10 Most- and Least-Common Jobs in the US

Least and Common Jobs in U.S.Did you know that there are more than 4 million retail sales workers in the U.S.? That’s enough people to populate some of the smaller states in the country. There are also only 310 prosthodontists in the U.S., which is probably smaller than your high school graduating class.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently released a survey outlining the most and least common occupations in the U.S. The survey also lists jobs by median wage, public and private sector, and geographic location. If you don’t want to scroll through pages of information, check out the multimedia news site The Atlantic for a quick summary and analysis of the information.

What do you think? Do you know of a job that is scarcer than a cosmetic dental surgeon? Let us know in the comments section below.

The 10 Most-Common (and 10 Least-Common) Jobs in America Today

Celebrate International Update Your References Week

International Update Your References WeekThe first full week in May is International Update Your References Week. Now is a great time to make sure your contacts maximize your candidacy and their information is current. It’s also a great time to touch base with any references you haven’t talked to in a while.

References are important because outside opinions can provide a positive testimony to your skills, ability, and commitment. To help build, update, or fine-tune your reference list, here are some Movin’ On Up articles that can help.

Top 10 Go-To People For Good Job References
Getting a Good Job Reference After You’ve Been Laid Off
5 Steps to a Brilliant Reference List
3 Tips on How to Ask Someone to Be a Reference
What Makes a Good Reference a Great Reference?
What to Do With Your Job References After you Get the Job

Do you have any questions about your reference list? Let us know in the comments section below and your question could be featured on our blog.

What Are the Best and Worst Jobs of 2013? New Survey Shows Surprising Results

Best and Worst Jobs 2013I remember sitting in journalism school listening to countless professors, guest speakers, and journalists telling me that I’d better love the news, because I’ll be miserable working there. While my concentration wasn’t in news or media, I never understood why working for a newspaper would be that bad. I interned at a magazine and it was rather rewarding.

A new survey by career development website CareerCast has proved me wrong by labeling “newspaper reporter” as the absolute worst job of 2013. If newspaper reporting is the worst kind of job, what’s the best kind of job this year? According to the survey, an actuary, – a professional who assesses financial systems to calculate the impact of risk and uncertainty, is the best job around.

Apparently, writers are out and mathematicians are in for the job market of 2013. Do you agree that the need for workers with math and statistics is on the rise while writers are a dime a dozen? Read the rest of the survey here and let us know in the comments below.

Best and Worst Jobs of 2013

Did College Prepare You For The Workplace? Take Our Poll!

Job Seeking and Career Advice PollLast year, Woods Bagot – a global architecture and consulting studio released a survey asking whether or not recent college graduates are ready for today’s workplace. Of the more than 500 C-suite executives surveyed, 70% believe fewer than half of the graduates entering their companies have the skills to succeed in entry-level positions.

What do you think? Did college prepare you for a successful career? Do you think completely achieving any higher education or a training program gives you the necessary skills in the modern workplace? Let us know in our survey below.