Tag Archives: college

5 College Majors Employers Love

degrees_employers_love_webThe decision to get a higher education is an important one. Often, a lot of money and time goes into earning a college degree, so it’s vital that you choose a career path that works best for you. If you’re thinking about getting a higher education, you may be wondering which college majors are currently in demand.

According to the National Recruiting Center of Express Employment Professionals, there are a handful of college majors that businesses are continually looking to hire. Are they in your career path? To find out, take a look at these five college majors employers love.

Finance
A bachelor’s degree in finance may lead to a career in banking, financial planning, money management, insurance, or tax preparation. Often, graduates with a degree in finance will qualify for a wide range of jobs in public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Examples of core courses in the financial degree path include accounting, economics, business law, and personal finance. According to Payscale.com, financial analysts make between $40,000-$70,000 a year, with monetary increases as you work up the ladder to management. In fact, according to Forbes, finance is one of the college degrees with the highest starting salaries.

Accounting
While finance is generally described as the study of how to manage money, accounting is the study of obtaining, collecting, and dealing with financial information. If you’re interested in becoming a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), a degree in accounting is the right choice. Careers for those with accounting degrees include bookkeepers, CPAs, auditors, tax specialists, and personal accountants, and courses in an accounting program typically include statistics, business law, cost accounting, and auditing. Payscale reports that the salary for accountants ranges from $35,000-$66,000, and CPAs range from $42-$106,000 annually.

Business Administration
The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) is a study that focuses on all aspects of business. Business administration programs are designed to teach a wide range of topics, including marketing, management, finance, human resources, and economics. The Master of Business Administration (MBA) requires additional schooling and is a professional degree. Business graduates may seek careers in human resources, marketing, or management, and many even land roles in high-level leadership. According to Payscale, office management jobs pay around $40,000 a year, while career paths requiring an MBA may pay anywhere from $53-$156,000.

Mechanical Engineering
If you’ve always been a builder, inventor, or designer, you may be interested in a mechanical engineering degree. Mechanical engineering graduates are sought by employers in many industries, including aerospace, automotive, chemical, construction, electronics, utilities, and energy. Typical courses in a mechanical engineering program may include calculus, chemistry, physics, and programming. The average salary for mechanical engineers, according to Payscale, ranges from $50,000-$93,000 a year.

Computer Science
A diverse field with many opportunities, computer science careers are in high demand. In fact, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, job openings for this career path are expected to grow by more than 20% through 2022. Courses include computer programming, web programing, information technology, programming languages, digital design, and more. There are many career paths for computer science graduates, including software developers, computer programmers, network administrators, web developers, database administrators, and software testers. Payscale reports that computer science degrees bring an average annual salary of $53,000-$150,000.

Vocational/Technical Education
College isn’t the only path to higher education. For many, there’s a better option: Career Technical Education (CTE). For those who don’t think college is the best option or want to enter the workforce sooner, a CTE can provide the skills and training they need for other in-demand jobs. According to Express, those sought-after jobs include medical assistants, welders, machinists, dental assistants, hygienists, CNC operators, and licensed nurses.

Non College Grads
If higher education isn’t for you, you’re not out of the race. A recent survey from Express revealed the hottest fields that are hiring the most non-college grads include office services, industrial, health care, marketing, and more. Take a look at the full list to help you build your career path.

Do you have a college degree? What does your educational path look like? Share your story with us in the comments section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

What’s the Difference Between an Apprenticeship and Internship?

apprenticeship_vs_internship_webIf you want to gain work experience while you’re still in school or right after graduation, you’ve probably looked into an internship or apprenticeship.

Both internships and apprenticeships can offer entry-level experience in your field of choice, but they operate in different ways. If you’re looking for one of these opportunities, you may be wondering what the difference is between an internship and an apprenticeship.

In short, internships allow you to learn in a work environment without pay or with minimal pay in order to gain experience. An apprenticeship is formal employment that trains you on a specific skill set while on the job.

So, how do you know which one is right for you? Take a look at each option in greater detail below.

Internships
Internships are usually a type of temporary work that last from a few weeks to several months. Internships are available in both public and private companies and nonprofits. Most people who choose to take an internship are seeking experience in a particular role or industry.

This type of employment is great for people who want to see a specific career in action before committing to it and those who want to gain experience that can benefit their future career. At its heart, an internship is an educational tool, not a training program.

Apprenticeships
What sets apprenticeships apart from internships is that an apprenticeship is an actual training program inside of a job. Apprenticeships usually employ people and teach them a specific set of skills needed in a particular career field.

Often, you will sign a contract with an employer to learn these skills, which can be a mix of formal experience, on-the-job training, and classroom work. You’ll also work toward requirements or a certification program, and if you pass, you then have the skills and formal qualifications to work a specific job.

These types of programs are common for careers like electricians, manufacturing, construction, and more.

Another difference between apprenticeships and internships are the salaries. Many internships are unpaid, while apprenticeships usually pay a salary. For an apprenticeship, the pay generally increases as you move through the training.

Choosing Your Career Path
Ultimately, choosing between an apprenticeship or an internship depends on the career path you want to pursue and what you are trying to gain.

If you want to stay in a specific industry and you are confident with your career path, an apprenticeship may be your best bet. However, if you are looking to boost your resume and experience or are trying out different positions, internships may offer what you need most.

Have you had an internship or apprenticeship? Did it work well for you? Share your experiences with us in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Who Is Hiring Non-College Grads?

12-9 GradsAre you thinking about getting a higher education? Or, are you considering skipping college and heading straight for the workforce? Before you make this important decision, check out the results of a recent survey from Express Employment Professionals. The survey revealed the hottest fields that are hiring the most non-college grads, and the top 10 are:

  • Industrial
  • Office services
  • Sales/marketing
  • Home help
  • Health care
  • Engineering/manufacturing/technical
  • Technical
  • Informational technology
  • Accounting financial
  • Licensed medical

According to Express CEO Bob Funk, “Today’s conventional wisdom suggests that the path to a rewarding career must run through a four-year university. In reality, we’re finding out that many sectors are hiring non-college grads.”

Do you work in any of these fields? Share your job journey with us in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Start Building Your New Career Today

start_your_new_career_today_webAre you a recent graduate? Are you new to the workforce? Are you looking for a career change?

If you answered “yes” to any of those questions, you may be in the process of building your new career. Getting started can be overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be. As long as you’re motivated to make your new career a success, your dream job can become a reality. To help you get started, check out these tips for building your new career today.

Know what you want.
Whether you just graduated, are entering the workforce for the first time, or considering a career change, the first step is knowing what you want in a job. Do a self-assessment of your values, hobbies, experience, and work preferences so you know when a job opportunity may be right for you. Knowing what you want before you apply helps you avoid getting stuck in a work environment that doesn’t match what you need. According to a Forbes article, “When your values are dramatically misaligned with those of your employer, you will become disengaged and possibly even disgruntled.”

Customize your resume for every job application.
Making sure your resume matches each job description helps you stand out from the competition and ensures that you’re the right fit for the job. Don’t forget to check for spelling and grammatical errors in both your resume and cover letter. Sending out material with mistakes may make you appear lazy to hiring managers and prevent you from landing an interview.

Spread the news!
Tell your friends, family, and mentors that you’re looking for work so they can help you search. You never know what connections are out there, and someone you know may be able to connect you with a potential employer. Networking is essential when you’re looking for a job, especially if you’re thinking about changing careers or are just starting out in the workforce.

Consider finding temporary or short-term roles.
Temporary work is not only a great way to earn an income while you’re searching for that perfect job, it’s also a chance to gain experience and skills you may not otherwise have. Temporary jobs even allow you to test out a career you may be interested in by helping you get your foot in the door. You can gain knowledge, skills, experience, and networking opportunities by working a short-term job in a field you want to explore. And, that temporary job could even turn into a permanent one. Consider applying with a staffing agency to find temporary or contract work that’s right for you.

Take advantage of social media.
Some of your social media sites can be a useful tool in your job search. LinkedIn, for example, is a great way to get noticed and find employers who are hiring. Think of LinkedIn and your other social networks like a digital resume and use them to showcase your skills, experience, and education. Remember to keep your social media clean and free of anything that may not make you an ideal job candidate for employers. If your social media profiles are public, chances are potential employers will look at them. In fact, a 2014 survey by Harris Poll revealed that 51% of employers who research job candidates online said they’ve found content that caused them not to hire the candidate. Think twice before sharing any photos, updates, or links that may be questionable or paint you in a bad light. When it comes to your job search, social media can make or break you.

Freelance or start a side business.
If you currently have a job, but have a hobby or skill you’d like to explore, consider freelance work. For example, if you love to write, but don’t know where to find writing jobs, try contacting websites or local newspapers to see if they’re looking for freelance writers. Or if you are really good at math, but don’t know how to use that in your career, reach out to schools and other organizations that may be looking for tutors. Freelancing allows you to take on small projects that use your skills while adding to your portfolio and experience.

Educate yourself.
If you want to change careers, you may need the proper training to do so. According to the University of Southern California, some college graduates earn more than twice as much as high school graduates. If higher education is in your future, start by looking for vocational schools and colleges in your area. In some cases, the training you need may be as simple as online certifications or courses. If you’re looking for a career change, check out this list of careers that will make going back to school worthwhile..

Make a list of companies where you’d like to work.
Forbes suggests taking the time to learn about companies you’d like to work for, and familiarizing yourself with that company’s leaders and the industry they’re in. Know what issues affect the industry and determine whether or not you have the experience and skills to offer possible solutions to those issues. Knowing industry trends is also a great way to start a conversation with potential employers and hiring managers.

What tips do you have for building a new career? Share with us in the comment section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

How Important Is Your Education?

how_important_is_your_education_web

In today’s world, education is often the best tool for getting ahead. It can help you grow in a variety of ways—you can pursue a passion, increase your long-term income, and have the experience of a lifetime. In fact, college graduates earn more than twice as much as high school graduates. Some studies have found that college graduates with a bachelor’s degree earn 80% more per year than those with only a high school degree. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the more education you have, the more your average salary increases.

Although college can be expensive, and the overall student debt has increased to roughly $1 trillion, the pay gap between those with a college degree and those without is increasing yearly. According to the Economic Policy Institute, Americans with four-year college degrees made 98% more an hour on average in 2013 than people without a degree—that’s a number that has consistently increased since the early 1980s when it was at 64%.

Educational & Social Benefits
Making more money in your lifetime isn’t the only benefit to a college degree. There are other educational and social benefits that can be drawn from a college education.  These include:

  • Quality of Life – Individuals who attend college make informed decisions, which can also lead to having more money. Studies have shown that college grads save and make more money and have more assets, including homes, cars, and investments. People who attend college tend to work in white collar jobs, in office buildings, or other facilities with air-conditioning, heating, and conveniences that improve the quality of life. Additionally, the Council on Contemporary Families reported that college graduates are less likely to divorce.
  • Work Productivity & Opportunity – If job satisfaction is important to you, then consider pursuing a college degree. Studies have shown that people who attend college have greater work opportunities, are more satisfied at work, and tend to have skills that can be easily applied in different work settings and different geographic locations. Additionally, those who attend some college are employed at three times a higher rate than those who have not.
  • Longer & Healthier Lifespan – In addition to the income boost that comes with higher education, college grads are healthier and have longer lifespans as well. A survey by the Center for Disease Control indicates that between 1990 and 2008, the life expectancy gap between the most and least educated Americans grew from 13 to 14 years among males and from 8 to 10 years among females. Unfortunately, studies have also shown that those with less education are more likely to have risk factors that predict disease—such as smoking and obesity. Having a higher socioeconomic status (measured by total family income, level of education attained and professional career status) is directly correlated with better physical health and life expectancy.
  • Self-Esteem & Psychological Well-being – When you walk across that stage with a diploma in hand, there is a sense of pride and confidence that no one can take away from you. Not only is it a rite of passage, but you’ve accomplished something that can never be taken away. Additionally, studies conducted by the College Board have found that those who have completed some college are not only more well-equipped to handle mental challenges, but also report a higher level of satisfaction when doing so.
  • Building a Legacy – One of the best parts of a college education is passing the benefits on to your kids. Children of college-educated parents are smarter, more likely to graduate from high school, more likely to attend college, and have a better quality of life.

Diverse Opportunities
Whether it’s a bachelor’s degree from a traditional four-year college or a Career Technical School, higher education has benefits far outside of knowledge and books. Whether or not education plays the most important role in your likelihood of getting hired, there’s no doubt that taking opportunities to learn and grow in your career is a beneficial piece of the puzzle. And, you don’t necessarily have to follow a typical four-year degree path. In fact, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 14 of the 20 fastest-growing occupations in America require an associate’s degree or less. If you’re hoping to further your education without following a four-year plan, check out this article for more information.

 

What other benefits have you seen from attending college? Let us know in the comments section below.

Make Your Move: Life After Graduation

make_your_move_life_after_graduation_webFor many, graduation day is around the corner. While graduating from college or high school can be an intimidating time, there’s hope for recent graduates in the job search. According to a survey by Michigan State University, 97% of employers plan to hire at least one new college graduate this year. While the odds are in your favor, you have to put in the effort to land the job of your dreams. To help you join the workforce, check out these five tips for making your move after graduation.

Know what employers are looking for.
A recent Movin’ On Up article compiled survey results from a variety of institutions who conducted research on the 2015 job outlook for recent college graduates. These results included a look at the job forecast, which revealed that employers plan to hire 9.6% more graduates in the United States than they did in 2014, and lists of the most in-demand college degrees and skills for new hires. Before you start your post-graduation job search, check out the statistics to better understand what employers want.

Use the power of social media.
Whether you’re graduating from high school or college, it’s never too early to create a LinkedIn profile. Even if you don’t have much to add to your profile yet, go ahead and get started on your account so you can use it to network with potential employers and get noticed. Forbes states that only one-third of college students have a LinkedIn profile, so creating one of your own is a quick and easy way to stand out from the competition.

Include any jobs you’ve had, from babysitting to retail, and list the skills you gained from those jobs. Make sure you also list your educational achievements, including any degrees, diplomas, and extra-curricular activities like newspaper or debate club. If you received any awards in school or your community, like volunteer or academic honors, list those too.

It’s important to remember that while employers are primarily searching LinkedIn for potential candidates, they can also find your other social media accounts too. So, keep your Facebook, Twitter, and other public profiles clean and professional at all times.

Get an internship, or volunteer in your community.
According to a study by Millennial Branding, a research firm, 85% of college students believe having an internship is either important or very important for their career. Furthermore, 52% said they hope to have had three or more internships before graduating, and 40% have already completed one internship. Since so many college graduates are looking to internships to gain experience, skills, and networking opportunities, you want to make sure you’re one of them. Try to find companies that are easily recognizable, either in the community or nationally, to help your resume stand out.

In addition to internships, you can also get ahead of the competition by actively volunteering in your community. There are numerous volunteer opportunities to consider, from working at a food pantry to helping build houses for the needy. By volunteering, you not only add valuable skills to your resume, but you also have the opportunity to network with others and do something charitable in the process.

Find a mentor.
We’ve talked about the importance of having a mentor, and the results of Millennial Branding’s survey support our stance. In fact, the survey revealed that 70% of college students have at least one mentor. Among the mentors listed were parents, professors, family, friends, and employers. Having a mentor can help you grow both professionally and personally, and can even help you on your job search. But, finding the right mentor is important to making sure you’re learning all you can. When you’re ready to pick a mentor, check out these five traits of a great mentor first.

Call on your school for help.
If you’re a college student, your school’s career services office can help you with the next step in your job search. Career offices can assist with resumes, cover letters, job interviewers, and more, but Millennial Branding reveals that only 29% of students use these offices. Be part of that group by visiting your school’s office and asking about what resources they can offer. In addition to workforce preparation, many offices also have an alumni database, which can help put you in contact with recent graduates in your field of study. Those graduates have already been in the workforce for a few years and may have tips of the trade you could learn, so take advantage of those resources.

Congratulations to the class of 2015, and good luck with your job search! Remember, even if you’re not a recent graduate, these tips can help you with your job search goals. It’s never too early to get started!

How do you plan to make your move after graduation? Let us know in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Poll: How Soon After Graduation Did You Get a Job?

MOV_POLL-ICONWhich is more important: education or experience? It’s an age-old question that has been researched and debated for decades, but one that doesn’t necessarily have a clear-cut answer. While the results from Glassdoor’s recent 2014 Employment Confidence Survey suggest that 82% of U.S. college graduates who were employed on a full or part time basis believed that their level of education has been an asset to their careers, 72% believe that specialized training outside of a traditional college degree is more valuable when it comes to the workplace.

Last year, we asked Movin’ On Up readers how their education has affected their career path. While the results of this poll were illuminating in the education vs. experience debate, we want to know how quickly recent graduates are being added to the workforce. To help determine how long a graduate typically spends looking for a job after going through the higher education process, we want to know how soon after graduation you landed a job. Let us know by voting in our poll!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.