Tag Archives: college

Want a College Major That’ll Get You Hired?

college_major_webIf you answered yes, you may want to consider studying business, engineering, or nursing.

According to a new report released by Express Employment Professionals, college graduates who have a business, engineering, accounting, or nursing degree will have a much easier time finding jobs than graduates in other professions.

By the Numbers

More than a quarter of the survey’s 115 respondents said business was the best major for finding employment, followed by engineering, accounting, nursing, computer, and information sciences.

“Business is still a good bet for a college major, according to our survey,” said Bob Funk, CEO and Chairman of the Board for Express. “Once again, our findings tell us that if you earn a degree that’s associated with a particular skill set, you will do better in the job market.”

In the second year of the survey, business remains the top answer.

“I advise people deciding what to study to consider both what they’re passionate about and what the market demands,” Funk said. “If those intersect, they’re in good shape. The most important thing is to be informed about and aware of which degree can give you a competitive advantage, both in the short term and the long term.”

A Closer Look

For college-bound students, here are the full results of the survey:

What college major makes someone the most employable?

2014

2013

Business

27%

26%

Engineering

20%

16%

Accounting

14%

14%

Nursing

6%

3%

Computer and Information Sciences

5%

13%

Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies, and Humanities

5%

2%

Engineering Technologies

4%

3%

Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences

3%

8%

Marketing

3%

3%

Education

1%

1%

Math and Statistics

1%

1%

Science Technologies

1%

1%

Communications Technologies

0%

1%

Finance

0%

3%

National Numbers

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the salaries for these jobs are also competitive. Consider this: the second most in-demand major is engineering, which averages a median starting salary of $51,700 to $97,900. Computer science has a median starting pay of $56,000 while nursing’s median pay is $65,470 per year.

Do these in-demand college degrees surprise you? Have you had success with these jobs? Share your stories in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Jobs Worth Going Back to School For

going_back_to_school_webAre you looking for a job or thinking about changing careers? If so, you’re not alone. In fact, a recent survey by CareerBuilder indicated that 21% of full-time employees plan to make a job change. This averages to one in five workers making a switch! In March, CareerBuilder also stated that more than half of all employers have open positions but can’t find qualified candidates, while 35% of employers said their organizations have had positions open for an average of 12 weeks before filling.

So, what’s the deal?

Training vs. Already Trained
Companies today are no longer seeing the value of on-the-job training for new employees like they once did, according to Bloomberg BusinessWeek. This is credited to employees changing jobs more frequently today than in the past. Instead of training employees themselves, companies are hiring for certain pre-existing skill sets and want employees to hit the ground running.

If education and experience are musts for landing the job you want, what industries are worth going to back to school for?

Future Top Industries
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the top occupations expected to experience growth between now and 2022 are:

  1. Healthcare Support (28.1%)
  2. Healthcare practitioners and Technical occupations (21.5%)
  3. Construction (21.4%)
  4. Personal care (20.9%)
  5. Computer and mathematics (18%)

To see the complete BLS report, click here.

Today’s Top Jobs
According to US News Best Jobs for 2014, the top 20 current jobs are:

  1. Software Developer
  2. Computer Systems Analyst
  3. Dentist
  4. Nurse Practitioner
  5. Pharmacist
  6. Registered Nurse
  7. Physical Therapist
  8. Physician
  9. Web Developer
  10. Dental Hygienist
  11. Information Systems Analyst
  12. Database Administrator
  13. Physician Assistant
  14. Occupational Therapist
  15. Market Research Analyst
  16. Phlebotomist
  17. Physical Therapist Assistant
  18. Civil Engineer
  19. Mechanical Engineer
  20. Veterinarian

For a complete list, click here.

If you’re not satisfied with where you are professionally, there is still time to change and plenty of opportunities waiting. From traditional education to career technical education, your options are limitless. Seize the day!

How has your education impacted your career path? Share your story in the comments section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

The Results Are In: How Has Your Education Affected Your Career Path?

poll_education_webIn a recent poll, we asked if your education has had an impact on your current job or career path. Our results found that the majority of Movin’ On Up readers don’t feel their education has played a defining role in their career path. In fact, 41% of respondents said that their education hasn’t been a factor, while only 22% percent agreed that “I wouldn’t be where I am today without my degree.” Nearly 20% of readers stated their degree “helped land my first job, but really hasn’t been a factor since.” And, 11% of respondents answered “Other,” with mixed opinions including:

  • “It has helped as far as showing potential employers commitment and potential.”
  • “You need experience plus a degree.”
  • “My undergraduate degree was the stepping stone to my law degree.”
  • “Nothing but four pieces of paper on the wall.”
  • “My lack of experience has kept me from getting an ideal job.”

Finally, 5% of readers answered “I’m still in school, so we’ll see!”

Education vs Experience
Based on our results, many jobseekers don’t think a typical path of higher education has helped their job search. Furthermore, respondents seem to believe that experience is worth the same as, if not more than, education. But, the statistics on the subject are mixed.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, the unemployment rate for young adults in 2013 was 29.2% for those who did not complete high school, 17.5% for those whose highest level of education was high school, and 12.2% for those with some college education. For those with a bachelor’s degree or higher, unemployment was 7%.

Yet, in a recent edition of the “America Employed” survey of 115 Express Employment Professionals franchises across the nation, respondents were asked to rate various traits on how important they are when evaluating job applicants based on a scale of one to five. The results showed that education received the lowest amount of points at 2.67. Experience, on the other hand, received a vote of 3.73.

Diverse Opportunities
Whether or not education plays the most important role in your likelihood of getting hired, there’s no doubt that taking opportunities to learn and grow in your career is a beneficial piece of the puzzle. And, you don’t necessarily have to follow a typical four-year degree path. In fact, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 14 of the 20 fastest-growing occupations in America require an associate’s degree or less. Career Technical Education provides the skills and training needed for many career, including welding, physical therapy, and mechanics, and is an alternative to a university. If you’re hoping to further your education without following a four-year plan, check out this article for more information.

What do you think is more important – education or experience? Let us know in the comments section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Poll: How has your education affected your career path?

MOV_POLL-ICONEducational paths, like college and career technical schools, can help pave the way to landing your dream job. But sometimes, the jobs we end up in aren’t directly tied to the education we received. Express Employment Professionals recently released the results of a survey conducted in both the U.S. and Canada which revealed that the least important factor when looking at job candidates was education. Instead, work ethic/integrity and attitude were the key characteristics that affected the hiring decision.

For our August question of the month, we want to know what role your education has played in your career or job search.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

What You Don’t Know About Career Technical Education

CTEwhitepaperAs the first college graduate in my family, I realized college really isn’t a good fit for everyone. There are other, more affordable options, and in today’s economy, affordability is key. Throughout the four years I spent in college, many of my peers chose to further their education through Career Technical Education (CTE).

What is Career Technical Education
According to the Association for Career and Technical Education, “Career and technical education (CTE) prepares both youth and adults for a wide range of careers and further educational opportunities.” CTE offers certifications, licenses and degrees in various trades and industries. “A stable career doesn’t always require a four-year degree. Career Technical Education can deliver what so many Americans want – a promising career at an affordable price,” said, Bob Funk, CEO and Chairman of the Board at Express Employment Professionals. CTE, previously known as vocational-technological education, provides skills and training needed for a variety of careers.

CTE offers industry-specific training in highly skilled trades, including:

• Mechanical Drafter
• Welder
• IT Technician
• Physical Therapist Assistant
• Biomedical Equipment Technician
• Legal Secretary
• Aircraft Mechanic
• Real Estate Appraiser

CTE also offers students the opportunity to earn a variety of credentials, including:

• Post-secondary certificates
• Certifications
• Licenses
• Associate degree

Another great benefit of CTE is that it doesn’t require tens or hundreds or thousands of dollars in student loans. “Many students find their passion in CTE programs and, in turn, develop substantially better academic performance that results in more life options for them,” said Robert D. Sommers, Ph.D., Oklahoma Secretary of Education and Workforce Development State Director, Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education.

CTE Workers Are in Demand
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 14 of the 20 fastest-growing occupations in America require an associate’s degree or less. These are exactly the types of careers that CTE provides training and credentials for. This is great news for high school students wanting to further their education somewhere other than a university. It is also encouraging for those who want to change their career path.

For more information on this hot topic, check out Express Employment Professionals latest white paper, The Hard Truth About Higher Education.

 

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Don’t Let Spring Break Ruin Your Reputation

Spring_Break_Reputation_March2014Spring break is finally here, and students everywhere are in the home stretch of this semester! The time has come for many students to take a much needed week away from school. It’s a time for fun, relaxation, and a chance to recoup from late night study sessions and homework. As you begin planning for your spring break, keep in mind that it’s easy for your reputation to be tainted in a short amount of time if you’re not careful. Here is some trustworthy advice to remember before you start your spring break shenanigans.

Protect Your Online Reputation
How can you protect your online reputation? By keeping your social media profiles private and being aware of what others post to them can help guard your reputation. When you and your friends get together there will probably be some pictures taken, and with the accessibility of Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, you could find pictures posted you wish had never been taken. Your friends could also include you in posts or status updates, so it’s important to have strict privacy settings on your social media networks before Spring Break begins. According to a study by CareerBuilder, two in five employers use social media to screen candidates. So you never know when a prospective employer is searching for you. If they happen to find an inappropriate picture or see something that they don’t like it can impact your job search.

Spring Break Precautions
Most students don’t plan on getting into trouble on Spring Break. Of course you want to have a good time, but if you’re not careful you could find yourself tangled with the law, or worse. While a “YOLO” attitude may serve you well in the moment, take a pause to consider future implications of snap decisions.

Take Advantage of Spring Break
Spring Break is a great time to jumpstart your career. You may not be able to get a job or intern at a company in a short week’s time, but there is another alternative – job shadowing. Shadowing someone for a few days will provide you with great insight into the everyday aspects of a job. Ask your friends and family if you could tag along and learn what a day in their life at work is like. Instead of going on a trip or just staying at home, get out and learn more about the career you want to have.

Finding a job is a full-time job in itself, so get a jumpstart on your future this Spring Break! How are you planning to get started on your job search, or are you already in the process? Let us know in the comments section below.

Welcome to The Real World – What to Do After College

What to Do After CollegeCongratulations to all of you who will be earning a college degree this month. After years of late-night studying, taking early morning exams, and living on a budget as thin as your ramen noodles, you’ve finally made it! But after receiving the important piece of paper and the celebration high is gone, you will probably ask yourself the same question I asked myself after it was all said and done:

“Now what?”

There are those fortunate few who are able to get a job right after or just before graduation; but for many, including me, there is a greater priority put on working unpaid internships, second jobs, and whatever else needed to keep a roof over their heads. While the job search should start before graduation, it’s not too late to begin after graduation.

We’ve got your back. Transitioning into the real world and finding a job doesn’t have to be an overwhelming and confusing journey. If you follow these guidelines on what to do after graduating from college, your job search might be a little easier.

Set a Goal
Before you do anything, you should have an idea of what you’re trying to achieve. Your goal, “to find a job,” is a given, but consider making smaller objectives that will help you achieve that goal, then build a plan to accomplish them. The more defined and realistic your plan is, the more likely you are to stick with it.

Start small by trying to make a few new contacts, send out resumes, or read a certain number of industry articles every week. Take some ideas from the rest of this blog to make small baby steps toward your goal.

Brake on the Break
Graduating from college is a notable achievement. I spent several years of my life working diligently to make my dream a reality. Since I worked so hard for so long, I felt entitled to take a break and enjoy my freedom for a month… or two. Looking back, I wish I hadn’t.

In a way, I felt entitled to a job since I sacrificed so much for a college degree. When I finally got around to starting my job search, I learned that opportunities wouldn’t fall in my lap – I had to earn them. While you may be tempted to take a break to clear your head, now is the time to make the job search a priority. The harder you work, the more likely you will get noticed.

Fail Fearlessly
Be prepared to fail. Trust me; you might fail more than once. You may be perfectly qualified for a job opening and perform all of the best job search activities, but for one reason or another, the potential employer may choose someone else. Your failures don’t define you, but how you bounce back from them does. Try harder, learn better, and then work smarter so you can be more prepared the next time around.

Monitor Your Social Networks
While it’s important to express yourself on social networking sites, it wouldn’t hurt to treat the content you post with a little class. If you are mindful and tactful on sites like Facebook, your growing professional network can prove to be a valuable asset to potential employers. Don’t forget that sites like Twitter and LinkedIn can be great tools to connect with leaders in your field and learn about job opportunities.

Don’t Stop Reading
Just because you may not be as skilled as other seasoned veterans in your industry, it doesn’t mean you should be lacking knowledge on the latest issues and trends. Find out what your industry leaders are reading and mimic them. It sounds cliché, but as the G.I. Joe shows always said, “Knowing is half the battle!”

Practice the Power of Positivity
When trying to get your foot in the door after college, showing passion and a positive attitude can set you apart from your competition. Your skills are still fairly limited, so displaying a willingness to learn with an optimistic point of view can help potential employers see that you are a worthwhile long-term investment.

Beggars Can’t Be Choosers
We all aspire for that dream job, but many times we aren’t qualified to perform the duties that come with dream jobs just yet. When starting at the entry level, you have to keep your expectations realistic. You may have to adjust the goals you set earlier to not only find a job, but develop your career for that dream job. In most organizations, you have to learn to serve at the bottom before you can work at the top.

Network Like There’s No Tomorrow
It really is all about who you know. It’s not so much the amount of people you know, but the right people you network with. You’ve learned how to build relationships with a diverse group of people, so take those skills and network with peers and leaders in your field who can help you accomplish your goals.

There’s a lot to figure out after graduating from college. But, you don’t have to figure it all out on your own. Take these guidelines and start searching for a job now. What was your job search like after college? Let us know in the comments section below.