Tag Archives: high school

A High School Graduates Job Search

What to Do After CollegeFor high school graduates, landing a job may be the last thing on their mind, but with graduation right around the corner, getting a job should be something to think about. Focusing on your career post high school can help lead you to choosing the best next steps.

Gaining Skills for Employment
Job options may be limited during high school, but having an idea of what job you’d like for the future could make a positive difference while preparing for life after high school. When choosing a career path understand the time and investment to become skilled in that occupation and the demand for workers with that talent. Going to college or a Career Technological Education school without previously deciding which major you want can lead to spending extra semesters and, in some cases, even years, to graduate. And, unfortunately, extra time spent in school means more student loan debt that could have been avoided.

Preparing For Your Job Search
Where do you begin job searching? First, if you’ve had some odd jobs or activities you participated in throughout high school, think back to what you enjoyed doing the most. Narrowing down your likes and dislikes is a great way to start in your job search process. If there are certain things you’re better at, or enjoyed more, focus on finding a job in that field or that will allow you to use your skills and abilities to the fullest.

Clean Up Your Social Media
Did you know your social media profile can make or break your job search. CareerBuilder recently performed a study that showed 34 % of hiring managers who currently research candidates via social media said they have found information that has caused them not to hire a candidate. So, be careful and keep that information in mind when posting and sharing things on your profiles

Job Options
Have you ever thought about working for a staffing company like Express Employment Professionals? A staffing company can offer a flexible schedule to accommodate your continued education and access to entry-level positions. Continuing your education while working doesn’t have to be a daunting task, and companies like Express are here to help you gain experience in many different fields.

How do you plan to job search after high school? If you’re out of school, how has your job search been since graduating? We want to hear about it. Let us know in the comment section below.

What You Don’t Know About Career Technical Education

CTEwhitepaperAs the first college graduate in my family, I realized college really isn’t a good fit for everyone. There are other, more affordable options, and in today’s economy, affordability is key. Throughout the four years I spent in college, many of my peers chose to further their education through Career Technical Education (CTE).

What is Career Technical Education
According to the Association for Career and Technical Education, “Career and technical education (CTE) prepares both youth and adults for a wide range of careers and further educational opportunities.” CTE offers certifications, licenses and degrees in various trades and industries. “A stable career doesn’t always require a four-year degree. Career Technical Education can deliver what so many Americans want – a promising career at an affordable price,” said, Bob Funk, CEO and Chairman of the Board at Express Employment Professionals. CTE, previously known as vocational-technological education, provides skills and training needed for a variety of careers.

CTE offers industry-specific training in highly skilled trades, including:

• Mechanical Drafter
• Welder
• IT Technician
• Physical Therapist Assistant
• Biomedical Equipment Technician
• Legal Secretary
• Aircraft Mechanic
• Real Estate Appraiser

CTE also offers students the opportunity to earn a variety of credentials, including:

• Post-secondary certificates
• Certifications
• Licenses
• Associate degree

Another great benefit of CTE is that it doesn’t require tens or hundreds or thousands of dollars in student loans. “Many students find their passion in CTE programs and, in turn, develop substantially better academic performance that results in more life options for them,” said Robert D. Sommers, Ph.D., Oklahoma Secretary of Education and Workforce Development State Director, Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education.

CTE Workers Are in Demand
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 14 of the 20 fastest-growing occupations in America require an associate’s degree or less. These are exactly the types of careers that CTE provides training and credentials for. This is great news for high school students wanting to further their education somewhere other than a university. It is also encouraging for those who want to change their career path.

For more information on this hot topic, check out Express Employment Professionals latest white paper, The Hard Truth About Higher Education.

 

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

This Year, Is Higher Education Worth the Cost?

Summer may be at its peak, but just around the corner, another school year waits. Not just for children to return to class from summer vacation, but for a growing number of people in America, from the unemployed to those with newly minted degrees. 

This year, a rising number of unemployed Americans are returning to school to improve their knowledge and skills in an increasingly tough job market. In fact, many community colleges reporting their largest enrollment spikes ever attribute the increase to the need to meet the demands of a highly competitive job market.

To cope with the monetary strain of higher education, many high school graduates are simply opting for a low tuition option such as in-state or community colleges, rather than ivy league, gold sticker institutions.

Many new college grads, who faced a dreary job outlook upon their recent graduation, are opting to go straight into grad school, fearing uncertain immediate employment future. In fact, the National Association of Colleges and Employers reported that 26% of new grads planned to go on to graduate school, up from 24% in 2008 and 20% in 2007.

So, with all this emphasis on going back to school, we want to know what you think. Is it worth it to get a college or graduate degree in this recession? Let us know by voting in our poll below.

 
Are you struggling with the decision of whether or not to enroll in higher education? Looking to increase your skills, or hoping a degree will help you earn a higher paycheck? Share your thoughts on higher education in our comments section.