Tag Archives: industrial

Stop Safety Hazards Before They Start

June is safety month, and we’ll be sharing useful graphics all month. Today we focus on industrial safety hazards.

If you work in industrial environments, you know that workplace injuries are far too common when safety isn’t prioritized. From minor slips and trips to major injuries and worse, there are plenty of possibilities.

In order to reduce workplace accidents, we created a graphic designed to remind workers of the best ways to protect themselves.

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Job Spotlight: Shipping and Receiving Clerk

Right your job search ship with this position.

Despite already having experience with several jobs, many working adults are unable to answer that age-old question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

Our Job Spotlight monthly blog series is designed to help you answer that question. In this series, we review all the basics of specific jobs, from salary and duties to why people do the jobs they do.

Shipping and Receiving Clerk

For this month’s Job Spotlight, we will cover information about Shipping and Receiving Clerks. As long as people are buying products, those products will need to be shipped and received, so job stability is quite high. Responsibilities mainly include receiving and checking-in each arriving package, as well as distributing and logging the internal delivery of the received goods. In addition, this position will also oversee the shipment of packages, which includes working with shipping vendors to ensure on-time pick-up.

Required Education

Usually a high school diploma or equivalent, although there can be exceptions.

Pay

Although it varies depending on a variety of factors (e.g. experience, industry, geographic area, etc.), Shipping and Receiving Clerks can make on average $15.27 an hour.

What Shipping and Receiving Clerks Do

Shipping and Receiving Clerks handle a variety of responsibilities, which may include:

  • Operating forklifts and pallet jacks.
  • Unpacking and examining shipments, looking for any damaged or missing items.
  • Record stock amounts and contact shipper with any problems.
  • Maintaining, restocking, and using shipping materials.
  • Maintaining safety and cleanliness in the shipping/receiving area.
  • Useing computer programs to track where goods are located.

What Companies Look for in Shipping and Receiving Clerks

Every Shipping and Receiving Clerk is different, but many need the following skills and attributes:

  • Three or more years of experience with shipping and receiving preferred.
  • Must be able to regularly lift 25 pounds, and at times up to 50 pounds, safely.
  • Ability to communicate and work well with others.

Not sure where to find a position like this?

We can help.

Headquartered in Oklahoma City, OK, Express Employment Professionals is a leading staffing provider in the U.S and Canada. If you have any questions about Shipping and Receiving Clerks in your area or job search in general, feel free to contact your local Express office or fill out our online contact form.

For More in Our Job Spotlight Series:

Insurance Agent

Warehouse Worker

Administrative Assistant

Medical Secretary

Welder

Sales Representative

Human Resources Generalist

Are you a Shipping and Receiving Clerk? What else should people know about your job? Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

Safety Month: Six Tips That Will Save Your Sight

The weather is heating up and summer is almost here. Yup, it’s already June folks! And that means it’s time to celebrate National Safety Month.

Proper back support, correct lifting techniques, and eye protection tips can get boring. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t worth discussing. Since looking at a few short articles can save you from chronic pain or injury, we think it’s worth it.

Here are our top eye safety tips to ensure you enjoy that annual fireworks show in July.

 

Who Is Hiring Non-College Grads?

12-9 GradsAre you thinking about getting a higher education? Or, are you considering skipping college and heading straight for the workforce? Before you make this important decision, check out the results of a recent survey from Express Employment Professionals. The survey revealed the hottest fields that are hiring the most non-college grads, and the top 10 are:

  • Industrial
  • Office services
  • Sales/marketing
  • Home help
  • Health care
  • Engineering/manufacturing/technical
  • Technical
  • Informational technology
  • Accounting financial
  • Licensed medical

According to Express CEO Bob Funk, “Today’s conventional wisdom suggests that the path to a rewarding career must run through a four-year university. In reality, we’re finding out that many sectors are hiring non-college grads.”

Do you work in any of these fields? Share your job journey with us in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Learning About the Job Market Forecast Before Graduation

JobGenius_webThe Job Genius program from Express Employment Professionals is an educational video series that offers insights on the job market and how to get a job. The video series includes information on everything from writing your resume, finding job opportunities, interviewing, and more.

As summer approaches, many high school students start thinking about getting a job after graduation. If you’re one of those job seekers, it’s important to understand what industries are trending, pay ranges in growing fields, and the education required for those jobs.

So, where do you start? Before you can determine the job you’d like to have, it’s important to first understand the education required for certain jobs as well as the jobs that are in demand or short supply.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 20 million jobs will be created over the next 10 or so years. In Canada, an additional six million jobs are expected to open. A lot of these jobs will be in industries like industrial trades, office services, healthcare, and sales.

With these jobs experiencing a rise in demand, it’s important to understand what it takes to start working in these fields. Check out the Job Genius video below for more information on in-demand jobs, salaries, education, and more.

To check out other videos in this educational series, visit ExpressPros.com/JobGenius.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Don’t Get Carried Away Working on Conveyor Belts

belts and loose clothingConveyor belts don’t seem like much. Compared to crushers and screening machines, belts seem rather harmless and easy. But in some industries, belt speeds range from 200 to 500 feet per minute, which can go more than eight feet per second. For the average person, the time needed to react is about one second.

Getting pulled up to eight feet is enough time to draw your hand, arm, or loose clothing into a pinch point before you can react. To avoid serious injury, here are some ways you can work safely on a conveyor belt.

Know the Rules
Before you touch heavy equipment like conveyor belts, make sure you are fully trained and educated on the proper safety procedures. It’s easy to get overwhelmed with deadlines and stressful work environments, which can lead to cutting corners on safety policies and processes. Also, before using a conveyor belt, be sure to know where the emergency shut-off is.

If you feel undertrained or unqualified to work near certain types of conveyor belts, notify your manager and request proper training. If you’re concerned with retaliation, consider weighing the importance of your health and safety with your job.

If the belt breaks down and you need to make a repair, be sure the belt is locked out. According to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), the belt should also have a sign reading “Do Not Operate” while the belt is under repair.

Protection is Pivotal
When operating or repairing a conveyor belt, loose clothing shouldn’t be worn. And remember never to lean over or across a conveyor to retrieve an item, because it increases the chance to be injured. Be sure to know your employer’s requirements for safety clothing before operating the conveyor belt.

Also, especially when repairing a conveyor belt, OSHA recommends that you should consider wearing safety equipment like hard hats and closed-toed shoes. Hard hats can protect a blow to the head when working below a conveyor belt. Safety glasses should also be worn to prevent pieces of debris from hitting your eyes.

Your employer is responsible for having all conveyor equipment carefully checked to ensure that guarding is provided for all exposed power transmission equipment and that guarding is maintained.

Don’t Make it a Hairy Situation
Loose clothing shouldn’t be the only thing kept away when working on conveyor belts. If you have long hair, make sure to keep it tied up and securely tightened on your head or in a safety hat. It’s best to keep it from hanging because it’s possible for hair to get caught in the belt, which can lead to head injuries. Accessories like jewelry or any item of clothing that could potentially be caught in the machinery shouldn’t be worn while working.

Being safe doesn’t have to interfere with your productivity and can actually improve it in the long run. Conveyor belts don’t have to be dangerous situations if you’re smart, follow safety procedures, and avoid wearing lose clothing and accessories.

Hands Are Our Tools: Grasping The Importance of Our Hands

Handtools_feb2012_webOur hands are one of the most versatile parts of our body. They can be tender and accurate enough to paint a picture, thread a needle, or play the harp. They can also be strong and powerful enough to swing an axe, move heavy objects, or clean floors. Our hands are also two of the most important tools we have. We use them in almost every aspect of our daily lives, and it’s important to keep them safe.

Keep in mind that your hands are also fearless. They will go to any place you send them and will act only as wisely as you want them. It’s a good thing to keep in mind where you put your hands and take proper care of the only two hands you’ll ever have. Here are some helpful hints to keep your hands safe and working properly.

A Little Foresight Can go a Long Way

Cuts and scrapes may not be a serious issue, but it can affect your productivity if you have to stop working to bandage a small scrape or cut. One of the best ways to do this is to take a proactive approach. Look at the area your hands will be working in and make sure there is nothing that can harm your hands. A good example would be if you were moving an object. Check to see if the doorways and aisles are wide enough to move through safely before lifting. You should also check if there is proper hand clearance when setting down the object.

In a Pinch

We’ve all been in a rush. We know the feeling of approaching deadlines and the stress of learning new things quickly. When we feel that kind of pressure, it can become tempting to cut corners.

Sometimes new employees are shoved into working with equipment without getting proper training and don’t realize some of the dangers when using the equipment. Veteran workers also get comfortable and skip procedures, which can lead to pinching your fingers or hand in machinery.

Small pinches can happen at home and they’re more of a nuisance than anything, but getting pinched while operating machinery can lead to severed fingers or broken bones. Make sure to have all safety guards in place, a clean area, and better attention to your hand positioning.

Rings of Doom

There are many jokes about how things were great for somebody until they put on a wedding ring, and that’s when the troubles began. Those kinds of jokes may not be far from the truth when it comes to our jobs.

Wearing a wedding ring or other types of hand jewelry can put your fingers in danger by making it easy for your hands to catch on machinery and other objects, which could result in injuries. If it isn’t an option to remove the jewelry, be sure to wear proper protective equipment like gloves to help prevent those items from interfering with your job.

Sometimes it’s the little things that we overlook that have major consequences. Your hands are no different. Such intricate and important tools shouldn’t be taken for granted. There are many little things you can do to keep your hands safe that don’t interfere with your day. Give yourself a hand and make sure they’re protected.