Tag Archives: job

Should You Move Out of State for a Better Job?

Is it Worth It?

You like where you live. Maybe you’ve already bought a house and your kids are enrolled in a great school. But you don’t like your job, the people you work with, your boss, or some combination of all three. You could also use a pay raise.

You’ve tried searching for a different job locally, but nothing seems right. But then you hear about a great job opportunity. The problem? It’s in a totally different state.

It can be hard to decide if a new job is worth moving for. Here are a few things to keep in mind before accepting that out-of-state job offer.

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Job Spotlight: Pick-and-Pack

Sort your career future with a pick-and-pack position!

Despite already having experience with several jobs, many working adults are unable to answer that age-old question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

Our Job Spotlight monthly blog series is designed to help you answer that question. In this series, we review all the basics of specific jobs, from salary and duties to why people do the jobs they do.

Pick-and-Pack

In this month’s Job Spotlight, we packaged together a bit of information about pick-and-pack positions. Any business with physical inventory needs pick-and-pack positions, so job security is high. Responsibilities include pulling items from shelves and preparing them to be packed and shipped, as well as inspecting items to ensure quality and appearance, packaging items per specifications, and maintaining warehouse inventory. (more…)

Why Do So Many People Hate Their Jobs?

Why are we so dissatisfied with our work?

You’ve heard about it in the halls. Around the water cooler. At parties. When you pick up your son or granddaughter. No matter where you go, at least one person is complaining about their job.

But it’s still surprising to see the statistics around work. The Conference Board recently published results regarding their latest survey on job satisfaction. They found that 51% of employees feel overall satisfaction with their jobs. Although this is actually an upward-trending number, the fact that 49% of workers remain unsatisfied is concerning, to say the least. In addition, workers noted disappointment in regard to the professional development aspects of their job. Meaning they gave the lowest marks to educational/job training programs. Other low categories include workload, the performance review process, and promotion policy.

But what else goes into hating a job? And what can you do about it?

Perceived Lack of Choice

Think of this as the “work just to get a paycheck” mentality. At a base level, many people only work to afford living expenses, pay student loans, enjoy hobbies, and fund college for kids. The majority often end up working for other reasons (parents’ expectations, to get married, to support children, etc.).

You might have dreams outside of your current company, but can’t risk pursuing those dreams because of monetary obligations. So, sometimes you sit at the same job, day after day, working on autopilot, just waiting for retirement.

The only way to get around this is to break free of constraints. If you truly hate your job, you should quit. But the future is scary. As a solution, consider working other jobs part-time, and think of it as a trial run. And if you just plain hate the industry you’re working in? Seek out online classes or night school to learn a new trade.

Office Drama

Your cubicle mate chews loudly, every day.  Amanda in Sales is jealous of your promotion. Your boss refuses to let you advance because he needs you to keep reporting to him. You just can’t get past that glass ceiling.

Office drama comes in many shapes and forms, from annoying coworker habits to illegal activity at the top of the food chain. No matter the severity of the drama, it can easily affect your work satisfaction.

For smaller issues, try contacting managers to discuss options. Or if you have a horrible boss, you can ask to move departments (just make sure to document all abusive behavior).

But for problems up at the top? It might be time to leave. To ensure that you don’t end up encountering another unstable company culture, check out Glassdoor, a site where employees can review companies. That way you’ll have a better idea of what you’re in for.

You’re Underpaid

This is a big one. Earlier we mentioned that, at a base level, most of us work to get a paycheck. If you’re working more than what your paycheck is worth, you’re going to be unhappy.

You see other people get promotions or raises and just grow even more unsatisfied with your job. You work harder than them—why haven’t you gotten a raise?

In many cases, this is because you haven’t asked for one. Asking is tough; we get that. That’s why we’ve provided the tools you need to negotiate a raise. And if they won’t pay what you’re worth? Start looking elsewhere. The job search can be intimidating, but what have you got to lose? In a worst case scenario, you’ll keep working where you are. But you deserve the chance to find something better.

And Express Employment Professionals can help. Let us do the job search for you. We work with employers all across the United States and Canada, and we know exactly what they’re looking for. Odds are, you’ll make the perfect candidate for one of those companies. Register online or locate an office near you.

Do you hate your job? Why or why not? Let us know in the comments section below!

Poll Results: Ace Your Next Interview With These Top Tips

 

Last month we drilled down on what readers want to see on Movin’ On Up. We asked one simple question: “What part of the job interview process do you need help with?”

Your answers were as follows:

 

What’s next?

The results were almost evenly split among the top four, so we’ll be sure to cover all those topics in upcoming blogs. But before that, here’s a bit of information about the top four.

Asking Relevant Questions

Questions you ask after an interview should be uniquely tailored to yourself or your interviewer. The key is to ask insightful, culture-based questions that won’t typically pop up during the interview. A few examples:

  • What is a typical day like at [company name]?
  • How is this company different from other companies you’ve worked at?
    • What makes it unique?
  • Tell me about a project or incident you experienced that truly embodied the spirit of [company name].

How to Create an “Elevator Pitch”

First things first—what is an elevator pitch? As defined by Investopedia, an elevator pitch is a “…term used to describe a brief speech that outlines an idea for a product, service, or project.” In the world of interviewing, your “elevator pitch” is a short way of describing who you are and why you’re right for the job. Think of it as a super quick version of your cover letter.

The easiest way to craft an “elevator pitch” is to look at your cover letter. You’ve already done the work! Just condense it into a few bullet points, and mix those with details specific to the job you’re interviewing for.

Despite the name, an “elevator pitch” doesn’t have to take place in an elevator. It works perfectly as an answer to an introductory question like “tell me about yourself.” When an interviewer asks that, they don’t want to hear you list your resume. They want to know about you as a person and how your experiences make you qualified for this position.

Discussing Skills/Past Experience

Listing past jobs in an interview is easy. Really getting into those experiences and the skills they represent is harder.

First, remember that you’re focusing on accomplishments, not job descriptions. Speak on how you increased ROI by a certain amount, typed a certain WPM (words per minute), or completed however many projects in a certain amount of time.

How Much to Share About a Previous Job

It can be difficult to answer questions about your previous job experiences when some of those experiences weren’t exactly positive. If you had a boss that was a tyrant, should you mention it? What about a company culture you didn’t fit in with?

Always keep in mind that your personality is being interviewed just as much as your job experience. You don’t want to appear rude or unprofessional. So, when an interviewer asks you about your previous manager, keep it to the basics. Feel free to mention why you didn’t fit in with a particular management style or company culture, but stay away from personal judgements.

Anything else you want to know about the interview process? Let us know in the comments section below!

 

Summer is Here – Do You Have a Job?

cool_impression_summer_job_webToday is the first official day of summer in the United States, which for some, means an increase in both temperature and free time. Every summer, many students look for temporary work while they’re on break from school.

To help you make the most of your summer job, we’ve dug through the Movin’ On Up vault to bring you valuable tips and resources this season.

Know the benefits.
Summer jobs are very valuable, and not just because they generate some extra cash. They can also help benefit your future by leading to full-time work, adding experience and skills to your resume, shaping your career path, and introducing you to important network connections. This Movin’ On Up article breaks down the benefits even more, so check it out if you’re on the fence about finding summer work.

Discover the hot jobs.
Finding the right summer job is essential. To get started on your job search, check out this infographic that introduces four jobs that are popular during the summer months.

Ramp up your search.
If your summer job search has stalled, don’t give up. It’s important to treat your job search as if it is your full-time job by being diligent in hunting for work, sending in applications, enhancing your resume, and preparing for interviews. You never know where a seasonal or temporary job can lead, so always remember to put your best foot forward. To help you ramp up your search this summer, take a look at this article.

Make a good impression.
In order to help your summer job lead to bigger and better opportunities, you must show value to your boss and make a good impression in the workplace. Adjusting your routine, taking on additional projects, learning from your mistakes, networking, and paying attention to your work wardrobe are all ways you can make a positive, lasting impression on your supervisor. Check out more tips in this Movin’ On Up article.

Learn from Hollywood.
Summer brings big hits to the box office, and often, those movies feature valuable lessons job seekers and employees can take away. If you’re wondering how Hollywood stories can help you land a job, and keep it, take a look at last summer’s blockbusters and see for yourself.

Clean up your social media.
Many of us take advantage of social media and its ability to help us stay in touch with friends and family. But, have you ever wondered what your social media presence may be doing for your job prospects? Just as much as your Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or other profile may be entertaining, it can also be harmful. To make sure your accounts aren’t hurting your chances of landing a job this summer, check out this Movin’ On Up article.

Are you working this summer? What tips do you have for finding a summer job? Share with us in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

What to Do If You Don’t Have a Holiday Job

holiday_job_find_webThe holiday season is a busy time for everyone, especially the retail industry. As the holidays approach, many businesses begin hiring additional employees to help with the extra workload. Since much of that hiring takes place before the holidays kick off, it’s important to secure seasonal work early. If you haven’t landed a seasonal job, check out these tips for finding temporary work this year.

Think Outside the Box
Retail isn’t the only industry in need of extra staff during the holiday season. Restaurants, catering companies, and event planning businesses also recruit extra staff during this busy season, so reach out to companies in your area to find out if they’re hiring.

The season’s increase in shopping also creates thousands of part-time jobs in other industries. Shipping companies need mail sorters and packers. And, grocery stores may need additional staff, especially during the week leading up to a major holiday. Because children are out of school, home care and day care are also in higher demand.

Check with family and neighbors to see if you can help with baking, wrapping, dog walking, running errands, or other tasks that people may be willing to pay for during this busy season.

Don’t Give Up
If you are struggling to find a holiday job, don’t give up. Keep sending your resume to companies you’d like to work for, or calling businesses you think may need extra help this season. Don’t forget to check out a staffing company like Express Employment Professionals for help finding a temporary job this season.

If you do score a holiday job, remember to work hard and showcase your skills so your part-time job might just transition into a full-time opportunity.

What was your favorite holiday job? Let us know in the comments section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

A Guide to Declaring Freedom From Your Job

break_free_quit_job_webOf course, we all want to find that perfect job that makes us happy, pays the bills, and offers a lifetime’s worth of job security. Unfortunately, those jobs are often hard to find. Author Seth Godin explains that there is a difference between a “dip” and a “cul-de-sac” when it comes to your job. Dips are really difficult periods of time that are full of opportunity to be the best. Cul-de-sacs, on the other hand, are periods where repeated effort and time only lead you back to the same spot.

If you’re struggling with your current job and it doesn’t seem like anything you try is going to make it better, consider the following tips on recognizing when it’s time to move on and break free from your job.

Assess your on-the-job happiness.
It’s important to find enjoyment out of what you do. Feeling accomplished when you complete a project or knowing that your work is benefiting someone else can help you stay happy on the job. But, if you’re not experiencing those feelings, it may be time to cut ties. If you absolutely dread going to work, so much so that you’re sick or find yourself depressed, do what’s best for you and try to find a job that will make you much happier.

Recognize your worth.
When it comes to proper recognition at work, there are a few ways you may be getting the short end of the stick. If you find out your employer is paying you far less than the market rate for your job, and professional discussions about raises and promotions aren’t resulting in any adjustments to your pay, there’s a good chance your current employer isn’t going to offer you more pay any time soon. If that’s important to you, you may want to shop around for other work.

Determine your supervisor’s level of support.
Likewise, feeling recognized by your supervisor is important to your overall job satisfaction. If you run into challenges at work, does your supervisor support you? Do you feel comfortable telling them about your challenges? According to Dale Austin, director of the Career Development Center at Hope College, “If you’re constantly experiencing problems with your manager, it might be a signal to look elsewhere.”

Evaluate your career path.
Do you have a set path for your career? Is advancement in a company a high priority for your work life? If you have big plans to move up in the company but there is little chance of advancement, it may be time to reconsider your position. Even if you love where you work, you may be missing opportunities to grow your skills if you’re stuck in the same role. “After you’ve learned all you can in your position, it is best to move on to a place that offers a clear path to work your way up,” said Chaz Pitts-Kyser, author of Careeranista: The Woman’s Guide to Success After College.

Go out on a positive note.
If you decide that breaking free from your job is the best step for your career, there are right and wrong ways to quit. Offering your workplace a two-week notice is customary, so try to give your supervisor advance notice that you plan to leave. You may need to train your replacement or tidy up loose ends on projects. Also, make sure you tell your supervisor that you’ve decided to resign before you tell anyone else. You don’t want your boss hearing the news from a gossip chain instead of directly from you. Remember to be thankful for the job and express gratitude to your employer, even if you’re excited to be leaving. You may have gained skills, experience, or friendships that will last far beyond the job, so be grateful for the things that did go well.

Before you decide it’s time to quit, try resolving your issues with your supervisor first. If pay is an issue, talk about your salary openly with your boss. If you feel stressed about your workload or a particular project, co-worker, or other workplace issue, go to your supervisor or the Human Resources department to let them know. If you can’t reach a resolution, or if you find the job just isn’t the right fit for your career path, it may be time to move on.

How did you know it was time to break free from a job? Let us know in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.