Tag Archives: job market

Poll Summary Results: Job Market Predictions for 2014

Poll_Results_Jan2014In a recent poll, we asked what your job market predictions for 2014 were. The results show a majority of people aren’t very optimistic about the job market in 2014, but others are remaining hopeful that things will look up.  Compared to the job market predictions of voters in 2013, there has been a slight positive change.

More than 36% of voters believe things will get worse before they get better, followed by 24% of people who are willing to take a risk and say they’re contemplating testing the waters to see what else is out there in the job market which is up 6% from 2013.

Coming in third, with 19% of the votes, are those believing they’ll see a promotion in their near future.
Another 13% of people moved from “staying put” to “testing job market water” in 2014 which is down 7% from last year. And 8% of the votes were for “other.”

The Up and Up
Regardless if you are optimistic and willing to take risks or if you’re not so hopeful about the job market in 2014, make each day count. You may not be able to predict your future, but you can work hard each day and help shape it.
For more insight on the job market or advice on your job search, check out these articles:
•    Use Networking Opportunities to Your Advantage
•    The Three Best Hard Skills to Have
•    Facebook and the Job Search
•    Job Search Success Simplified

What are your job market predictions for 2014? Take our poll:

Although business and consumer confidence took a hit this past year with the partial government shutdown, the news for 2014 is not all doom and gloom.

A study on the job market by Forbes anticipates moderate growth for 2014. Job opportunities are expected to start perking up towards the middle of next year.

With 2013 coming to a close, we want to know your thoughts and what you expect in the 2014 job market. If you have your own prediction, share it in the comments section below.

Job Searching… Where do I Start?

How to Start Your Job SearchLosing or leaving a job can bring even the most positive person down. And, if you find yourself in this situation, it’s important to remember when starting your job search to think upwardly – in your attitude and actions. Staying optimistic can keep you motivated and energized during your search, be an impressive quality to potential employers, and help point you in the right direction.

Thinking “up” isn’t just in your attitude, it’s in every aspect of your job search. You can remember these three “ups” that will give you a starting point for your job search:

Touch up
First, start internally by updating and touching up your resume. Don’t worry about how long it is, just start updating by listing your previous jobs and include your achievements in each job. Employers look for tangible, real figures like the number of customers you have served in a day, how much money you saved the company, how much you increased your employer’s business, how many products you sold, or the amount of people you managed in a team and how it impacted your employer. Don’t just list your job duties. Listing specific achievements will catch a hiring manager’s attention. Once you find the job openings you want, then you can customize your resume with the right experience that best fits that job description for a tighter, more effective résumé.

Lookup
Now that you are ready to market yourself as a job candidate, it’s time to find your venues. First, look up former employees or managers you worked closely with and ask for their permission to serve as references. Some employers require a list and contact information for those who can vouch for your work, and you’ll need to have it ready. Think outside the box too. If you volunteer or have any group hobbies, include someone who can say good things about your leadership or soft skills. These references can also help connect you with decision makers and influencers in your field that you can build relationships with in the future.

Use an internet search to find local professional clubs or groups in your area. Most of the time, their websites will have job postings, networking events, and chances for you to grow and develop trending skills in your industry if you attend their meetings. You can also find out where employers and recruiters post the kinds of jobs you need, and you can find where you can post your resume so it can get the most attention. If you have an idea of some companies you’d like to work for, research their websites and find some people who work for them to get to know the company better. Check your network to see if you know any current employees.

Set up
With the people and venues you’ve found, the next step is to get ready. You may be rusty or haven’t had much practice interviewing or building a resume, so here is your chance to get some peer review. Call and schedule time for an informational interview with your references, leaders in your professional association, or the new contacts you made at a company of interest to you. These informational interviews can help you see what you’re good at and identify areas you need to improve. They can tell you what you should focus your resume on and what to leave out. You’ll feel more confident and comfortable when you go in for a real interview.

It’s also a good idea to set up professional or work-related social media profiles like Twitter, Linkedin, or a blog to help build a professional image when employers research your name.

Did you start your job search a little differently? Tell us your story about starting a new job search in the comments section below.

New Job on the Horizon? 4 Ways to Make an Easy Transition.

The global economy is improving, according to the chairman and chief executive of Monster Worldwide Inc. in a recent article on The Wall Street Journal. And that means the job market is on the rise. Job postings across every industry, from professional to occupational sectors, are increasing on the popular job search engine website, giving experts hope that the economy is beginning to stabilize, allowing job seekers to breathe a sigh of relief.

As the job market loosens and employers start to hire again, job seekers and those looking to change professions may find themselves in a transition – moving back into a full-time career or starting a new one. This can be overwhelming, exciting, nerve racking, and stressful. If you’re about to embark on a new journey on your career path, make your transition easier with these four tips.

Know your industry. Whether you’re jumping back into the job market after some time off or just changing careers, make sure you’re up to speed on the desired industry you want to work in. Research the latest trends by attending workshops, conferences, or education seminars that are geared for the career you’re searching for. This will help you be prepared when opportunity comes knocking.

Identify your transferable skills. Once you’re updated with the latest industry trends, identify the transferable skills you need to be successful in that line of work. All transferable skills fit into five broad skill categories: leadership and management, professionalism, communication, research and planning, and relational. To help you organize and clarify your skills, check out Secrets of the Job Search: Identify Your Transferable Skills.

Update your résumé. Now that you have researched your industry and identified your transferable skills, it’s time to update your résumé to reflect the career you want. Create a standout résumé that showcases you and your skills, helping you transition from one type of job to another.  

Network. Your next step is to attend every possible networking event. You can even join organizations that don’t directly align with your industry, just as long as you get out there and meet people. Focus on building strong relationships with your contacts. Use networking opportunities to your advantage.

No matter if you’re changing jobs, just starting out, or starting over in the workforce, the time has come to prepare for the job search again. And, using these four tips will help you transition from one to another. So, stop dragging your feet. Get out there and start searching for your next adventure.

Poll Indicates Optimism About Economy

The year of 2009 is behind us, and 2010 is charging full steam ahead. As the economy continues to show signs of improvement, economists are predicting it will only be a matter of time before businesses and jobs start ramping up again. In January, a total of 652 people responded to our survey, “Are You Optimistic About the Job Market?

Of those who took the survey, 53.4% said they are optimistic about the job market this year, while 46.6% said they are not.

These numbers are an improvement over a similar poll that we took in March 2009. On that survey, more than 1,200 readers voted. Of those who took the survey, only 38.8% said they were optimistic about the economy over the next six months while 61.2% said they were not optimistic.

Overall, the outlook on the economy is looking up. Do you have any additional thoughts about the economy over the next six months? Share your thoughts here.

Before the Job Hop: First, Face Yourself (If You Dare)

Of late, the news is focused on low employee job satisfaction. The lagging economy and resulting layoffs have fueled that focus.

While job satisfaction appears to be at an all time low, the number is at a stand still. In 2008, best selling author Patrick Lencioni who wrote The Three Signs of a Miserable Job referenced a Gallup poll revealing that 75% of employees hated their jobs and 35% had checked out. Some of the most common reasons employees leave their jobs are:

  • Personality conflicts with their supervisor/co-workers
  • Salary and/or benefits package
  • No advancement opportunities
  • Lack of two-way communication between management and employees

Of course, due to pressures from the recession, many of these situations are likely to be more extreme than before. But, though 80% of people would consider job hopping, it’s highly unlikely that 80% of employees in the U.S. will actually change jobs this year.

So, if you’re feeling some dissatisfaction at work, it’s important to ask yourself what you’re going to do about it. Are you going to check out and stay on the clock, tanking your professionalism and reputation where you are? Are you going to look around for other opportunities (that may or may not be better than your current position)? Or, are you going to do something to create happiness in your current position?

While extreme life circumstances such as health issues or diagnoses of clinical depression affect happiness levels, your job situation may not be as extreme as it feels. If you’re unhappy in your job, perhaps a change in perspective could help change your outlook on your current job situation. 

Author and speaker John Maxwell suggests that job satisfaction is largely based on your ability to lead yourself. In his book The 360 Degree Leader he devotes nine chapters to Lead-Up Principles. Within these chapters, he helps the reader discover ways to gain the respect of their boss and peers. When you feel respected, your job satisfaction will increase. If you want to be respected and valued for your contribution, often that is gained through the actions you take to achieve that level of respect.

A few of Maxwell’s principles include:

  • Be willing to do what others won’t.
  • Be prepared every time you take your leader’s time.
  • Know when to push and when to back off.
  • Become a go-to player.
  • Be better tomorrow than you were today.

Whatever you choose to do with your career in this recession, make sure you take time to consider the bigger picture first. And, if you do choose to leave, make sure you’re not just running away from something but you’re running towards a better opportunity.

by Jennifer Anderson, Guest Blogger
Vice President of Marketing and Communications, Express Employment Professionals

Are You Optimistic About the Job Market?

As the economy continues to improve, experts anticipate an increase in jobs this year. They are also forecasting issues with employee retention, as they believe many will job hop into a new opportunity.

What are your thoughts about the job market, whether you currently have a job or not? As we begin 2010, do you think the job market is going to be better in the next six months?