Tag Archives: job opportunities

Quick Tips for Getting Through the First 90 Days at Work

facts_about_company_webYou rocked your interview and landed the job! Now what? The first 90 days of work are important for any new employee. It’s during this time that you are able to shape important first impressions, build relationships, and establish a rhythm for your new role.

Here are some quick tips to help you navigate those first 90 days successfully:

  1.  Get to work on time.
  2.  Do your homework. Take the time to learn all you can about the company, its product and services. Skim through the bios of the company’s executive staff.
  3.  Set up one-on-one meetings with key people who you will interact with. Remember names. Find out which departments you will need to work with.
  4.  Say yes. Be willing to take on opportunities that present themselves, as long as you feel comfortable doing so. This is a great way to show initiative and get involved.
  5.  Build relationships. Ask your co-workers to grab a cup of coffee with you, and get to know them better. Doing this helps builds connections. Be sure to ask questions about their job duties to gain a better perspective on how the department works. This will help you know how to approach them about future projects or tasks.
  6.  Deliver on deadlines. If you promise to complete a task by a specific time and date, then be sure to keep your promise. No one likes a bunch of excuses.
  7.  Work hard. Stay focused on the task at hand and avoid distractions.
  8.  Learn the office politics but resist involvement. Stay away from the internal politics and turf battles. Learn the inner workings of the organization without having to choose sides. Getting involved is a no-win situation.
  9.  Understand your role. Get a clear understanding of your job responsibilities from your leader. Taking advice from co-workers can be helpful, but confirm your specific job duties with leader .
  10.  Have confidence. The skills that you have acquired in your professional life landed you the job; now learn your strengths and weaknesses as it relates to your new job.

If you recently started a new job, let us know in the comments section below how you got through your first 90 days.

Job Opportunities at Express

Over the past few years, Express Employment Professionals has put over a million people to work. And we’re on a mission to help a million more. We help find the right jobs for the right people. Recently an Express office in Springfield, IL named Pam Gibbons their employee of the month. Her boss, the owner of the Springfield office, Jim Britton, stated, “Pam Gibbons has been a wonderful asset to the Springfield, IL office for almost two years. She is always pleasant and makes a good first impression when she is covering the reception desk and answering the phones. She has a positive attitude and willingly takes on any task assigned.” Pam Gibbons tackles easy and complex tasks with the same exuberant resolve.  She is not afraid to ask questions and offer ideas on how to execute certain types of activities to make the best use of time and resources. Pam carries a lot of responsibility.

Just like Pam, Express may be able to help you. At Express, we provide temporary to long-term, part-time to full-time, and entry-level to executive-level positions. Whether you’re a machine operator or an accountant, Express is about helping as many people as possible find good jobs.

Want to know if Express has a job that’s right for you? Contact your local Express office today. It’s free and easy!

Check out this video to learn more.

 

Getting to Know the C Suite – Advice for Dealing with Upper Management and Executives

EntryLevelLifeButton_E When you think of working with upper management or executives in your company, does it make you feel slightly nervous or make your heart start to beat fast because they hold so much power over your career? When you get into the work world, there will be times when you have to interact with executives on projects. So, make the most of the opportunities to impress your company’s management with these tips.

Be respectful of executives and their time.
When it’s time for you to meet with the vice president of marketing or the director of operations, be sure you are prepared for the meeting. People who work in upper level positions have a lot to focus on and a lot of meetings to attend. So, don’t waste their time. If the leader requests the meeting, ask in advance about what you need to bring. Be sure to research your topic of discussion, identify key talking points, and prepare a PowerPoint, Excel spreadsheet, graph, or document for the meeting as needed. Prepare questions you need answers to. Make it a point to be over prepared and have more knowledge about the meeting than you plan to use. And, always thank them for their time at the beginning and end of each meeting.

Reserve time on their schedule.
As mentioned above, managers and executives are busy. Be sure to reserve the appropriate amount of time on their calendar for your meeting with them. You may need to coordinate with an administrative assistant. If so, be sure to go through the right channels to book the correct time and space needed to meet. You can’t just walk into an executive’s office whenever you want to meet. To get their full attention and ensure uninterrupted time, be sure they receive and accept a meeting request. You may also want to follow-up with their assistant on the day of the meeting to make sure they are on schedule. Be flexible with your time when dealing with executives because something might happen prior to your meeting that requires you to reschedule with them for a later time.

Know how to address them. 
Do you address executives formally as Mr., Mrs., or Miss, or do you call them by their first name? This is something that may differ across the board depending on your company’s culture. At times, you might have an executive who is really personable and likes to joke around with everyone. But, if you address them informally, it could be offensive to them. You might have a Generation X manager who is more laid back and wouldn’t ever dream of anyone addressing them with a formal title. To be on the safe side, always address executives formally on the first meeting. From there, they can let you know a little more about their personality and specifically how to approach them in the future. After your meeting with them, if you’re still not sure how to address them, follow the lead of those around you, and when in doubt, be more formal. 

Always be honest and act with integrity.
When you’re in a meeting with upper management or executives, always be honest about what you know and don’t know. If, for example, someone unexpectedly asks you to report on the specifics of a project or how much something will cost and you don’t know the answer, don’t try to make something up to look good. Be up front and honest and let them know you don’t have the answer for them, but that you will research it and get back to them quickly. In most cases, they will respect you for your candor. Either way, it’s better to be honest than to fudge the truth and get found out later. 

Know your next plan of action when you leave the meeting.
Before the meeting is over, make sure you are aware of the next steps you need to take to complete a project. Know your key action items and any upcoming deadlines. If you are not clear about something, ask for clarification before the meeting is over. If you have any questions, be sure to ask. Sometimes you might be fearful of asking an executive a question because you’re afraid of what they will think of you. But, by speaking up and asking thoughtful questions, you’re letting them know you want to do a good job.

It’s important to realize that although those in upper management and executive positions hold some significant power within the company, they are still people too. There’s no reason to get worried about interacting with them. If you do get the opportunity, it is a sign that your employer trusts you and respects your work, and it’s an opportunity to learn from the very best in your organization.

Looking for New Job Opportunities? Advice to Improve Your Results

How are you looking for new job opportunities? Are you waiting for them to just appear or are you actively seeking them out? Searching for a career is a full-time job in itself, and it’s important to exhaust all your avenues for finding employment. To help you be more proactive with your efforts, here are some tips to improve your job search efforts today.

Attend networking events. If you know what industry you want to work in, try to get plugged into professional meetings in that field. This will give you an opportunity to network with others who work in that field and make valuable connections. Introduce yourself to them and don’t be afraid to tell them what your goals are. When you attend these meetings, always have your résumé and business cards on hand with you and pass them out. You want people to leave that meeting with a good impression of you.

Talk to people. You never know if somebody knows somebody who is looking for a new employee. Make it a point to get out there and just meet new people. When you’re at your local coffee shop, strike up a conversation with those around you. Ask others what they do for a living, and then tell them about yourself and what you want to do in life. Also, keep your friends and family updated about what’s going on with you. It never hurts to share your story with others.

Volunteer for organizations. Seek out volunteer opportunities that would provide you with experience related to what you want in a job. If you like marketing, volunteer to do some writing for a non-profit organization. If you want to do construction, contact Habitat for Humanity to see if they have any projects for you. These are great ways to build your skill set and be able to measure the impact of your results.

Get online. Check out company websites and others like Indeed.com to search for job openings. Submit your résumés online, along with a copy of your cover letter. Be sure your contact information is included. Apply for all the job openings you qualify for. The more you apply, the more your chances go up of hearing from an employer about a possible interview.

Also, set up social media networking accounts such as Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter, if you don’t already have one. This is another great way to make connections with others. You can include information on these profiles about your skills, experiences, and what type of jobs you’re looking for. Again, you never know who could see your online profile and want to meet you.

Instead of waiting for opportunity to knock on the door, it’s important for you to take some initiative and push that door open just a bit and introduce yourself to new possibilities. If you keep approaching the job hunt the same way you always have, you will get the same results. Try these tips to help find the job you want.

Seeker or Sleeper: What’s Your Job Search Style

Have you ever thought about the differences between superstars and slouches? We usually think about separating the high achievers from the low performers on the job, but it pertains to job seekers as well.

The three indicators discussed in The Key Differences between Superstars and Slouches can also relate to the different styles of people searching for jobs.

First, people who find jobs understand that finding a job is a full-time position. They devote an 8-hour workday to the process. They wake up in the morning, get ready for the day, and start their job search bright and early. They filter through employment opportunities, compiling a list of prospective employers to submit their résumés to. They don’t allow past failures or a sluggish economy to get in the way of finding a job.

Second, successful job seekers usually are relentless in their job search process. They pound the pavement looking for employment opportunities wherever they can find them. They don’t limit their job search to certain hours of the day. After they submit applications and résumés, they follow up with phone calls to ensure that potential employers have received all necessary documents and request a time for an interview. They don’t wait around with fingers crossed.

Third, job getters are the ones who don’t make excuses for the lack of employment opportunities. They understand the obstacles that stand in their way. Whether it’s a down economy, a competitive job market, or a lack of qualifications inhibiting their job search success, they reevaluate the situation and determine solutions.

The job search process may take longer than would have a year ago, but there are still jobs available. The difference is the job seeker. Successful job seekers process these three key elements, and the sleepers, well um, they sleep. So, don’t give up and fall into a job search slumber.

Check out your local Express office today for help in the job search process.

Is a Two-Week Notice Still Necessary?

I recently read an article on MSNBC titled Take this job and shove it! The article talks about how employees who survived recent company layoffs aren’t following traditional job protocol when they leave their company. Employees are now leaving without giving their employers a two-week notice, and some are even going to work for competitors – despite noncompete agreements they signed with their previous employer.

Company layoffs and benefit cuts can leave surviving employees feeling angry, scared, and nervous that they might be next on the chopping block. In this economy, employers can’t promise their employees that no more cuts will be made. Even if employers give a sense of security to their workers, the trust between the company and its employees is already broken, resulting in many people searching out other job opportunities.

Often, when the trust is broken between employers and their employees, employees no longer feel obligated to give a two-week notice. The need to feel in control of the future often overrides feelings of loyalty and common workplace courtesy toward employers.

But, is it OK to leave your current job without giving the courtesy of a two-week notice?

Leaving your place of employment for better opportunities, a more secure job, or simply because you don’t like how they handled things when layoffs came around is not necessarily a bad thing. But, leaving without giving your employers adequate notice is not good for your professional image.

So, if you’re looking for different employment, don’t leave on a sour note or burn bridges with your employer. No matter what the situation, make sure to give ample time for the company to make alternate arrangements and offer your help to make sure the transition is an easy one. Leave with your professional image intact, and you will not only feel better in the long run, but you’ll leave the door open for any possibility your career leads you to.

Where to Find Hot Summer Jobs

Summertime is a great season to pick up a second job or work a temporary gig. Every summer season, there are many positions available other than fast food and retail jobs. You just have to know where to look. So, if you’re out of school, between employment, or just looking to pick up some extra cash, make sure to check out these hot summer job opportunities in your community.

Work Outside

Many cities have a local parks and recreation department that’s responsible for community pools, golf courses, and other activities. Parks and recreation positions are available seasonally to job seekers who want to enjoy the sun and heat of the summer. Check out your local parks and recreation website to find employment opportunities for positions like:

  • Lifeguards
  • Pool help, such as selling snacks or accessories
  • Golf course attendees and golf cart drivers
  • Ballpark concession stand workers
  • Sports umpires and referees
  • Park maintenance and security

Work with Children

Many children who are out of school for the summer participate in summer activities like sports or need a baby-sitter while their parents are at work. So, if you’re interested in working with children this summer, check out these seasonal jobs: 

  • Daytime camp counselor
  • Tutor
  • Baby-sitter or nanny
  • Class instructor, such as arts and crafts or sports instruction
  • Summer school assistant

If your schedule allows, getting a summer job can be a great way to build your résumé, earn income, and even make friends while still having fun in the sun. The possibilities of summertime employment are already growing, so find the job that’s right for you – whether you’re looking to improve your job skills or just get a tan.