Tag Archives: job seekers

The Best Apps to Organize Your Job Search

organize_job_search_apps_March2014In this ever-changing, technologically advanced world we live in, it’s important for job seekers to stay proactive in order to find work. It’s also important to keep everything organized during your job search. And what better way to do that than by using your smart phone? Although staying organized throughout your job searching process can seem overwhelmingly difficult at times, these helpful apps can help make your life easier.

Resume Builder Pro
This best-selling app just changed its name from Pocket Resume to Resume Builder Pro. It allows you to create, maintain, and email your resume from your Apple, Android,  or Blackberry device. Resume Builder Pro simplifies the tedious task of compiling a resume by doing the work for you. Check it out on your iPhone/iPad app store or Blackberry Web Store for $2.99 and on Google Play for Androids for $4.99.

Job Search Organizer
Job Search Organizer was named the best and most popular independent job search app in the Apple app store and is the only app on the market that successfully combines job search and organization features. This free app is currently only supported by Apple.

Evernote
Use this app to store notes, voice reminders, and ideas, as well as create to-do lists, manage tasks, attach images, and more. This award-winning app allows you to capture your memories and find everything fast, while giving you the ability to access it from anywhere. You can find free downloadable versions of Evernote for Windows, Mac, Android, iPhone, iPad, BlackBerry, and more at www.evernote.com.

Dropbox
This free app is compatible with Apple devices, Android, BlackBerry, and the Kindle Fire and allows you to bring all your documents like resumes, a reference list, and cover letters, with you anywhere and lets you share them easily.  With everything you need consolidated in one place, you have the ability to respond quickly when opportunity strikes.

It can be hard to keep track of every detail of your job search, so take advantage of these helpful apps. Each app is user friendly so don’t worry about being tech-savvy to be able to use them. Do you use apps to help organize your job search? What apps have helped you? Share with us in the comments section below!

Poll: What do you think the impact on jobs will be if the minimum wage is raised?

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How would an increase in minimum wage affect jobs and hiring? The debate has been circulating for a while over whether a higher minimum wage will cause more people to accept the current job openings or whether those jobs will be eliminated by companies due to the increase in cost to their business. Let us know what you think by voting in our poll.

Look! Interview Tips

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Have you ever wondered what goes through the hiring manager’s mind when you’re in an interview? Wouldn’t it be nice to know what they were thinking, what they want to hear from you, or what they want to see on your resume? We asked a few hiring managers to share their insight on interview musts and they shared these top four interview tips.

Have Professionalism
The employer you’re interviewing with has goals to grow and brand a company. It’s important to understand that how you present yourself in your personal life may not match the image of the organization, so remember to put your best foot forward. Dress appropriately for the job for which you are interviewing. If you’re not sure, it’s a good idea to ask the interviewer about the dress code. Additionally, there is so much more to professionalism than just dressing the part. Integrity and a good work ethic are also very important attributes to possess and can take you a long way in the hiring process. So make sure you can show these attributes to your interviewer and be ready to share good examples of those traits.

Have a Typo-Free Resume
Job seekers often trust their own eyes to proof and edit their resumes. If no one else reviews your resume, there could be typos that you missed. Find a friend who is great at spelling and grammar or someone that you respect professionally to review and critique your resume before your job hunt, and especially before an interview. If the interview process boils down to three people with the same qualifications and your resume is the only one with a typo, you’re making it easy for an interviewer to choose another candidate.

Have Interest in the Job and the Company
Jennifer Anderson, the hiring manager and vice president of Marketing and Communications at Express Employment Professionals, said, “Often I ask a job seeker to describe to me the ideal job and more times than not the answers come back with something completely unrelated to the job they are seeking. For example, someone may interview for a Marketing Coordinator’s position, but when they describe the ideal job, they want to be a stay at home mother and work from a home office.” So it’s important for the interviewee to understand not only the qualifications of the job they are applying for but also what it is they really want to do with their life and career.

Have a Commitment for More than One Year
Longevity is one of the top qualities employers look for in new hires. Most employers will spend the first six to nine months training you to do a job. Not only will they have invested their time and shared their knowledge, the company has been paying you a salary during your training period. Do your best to learn all you can during training and commit to making the most of your job for a couple of years. Anderson encourages people to let the interviewer know that you’re reliable, you’ll give it your best, and you plan on sticking with the company to help it grow.

After job searching for what seemed like forever, editing your resume, and applying at numerous businesses, it’s time to prepare for an interview. What are some interview tips you’d like to share with us? Let us know in the comments section below.

Poll Results: Why Did You Leave Your Last Job?

poll_Results_Turnover_Feb2014In a recent poll we asked why you left your last job or why you’re planning to quit. The results show 34% of respondents want better compensation, while 13% said they didn’t get along with their supervisor. Another 13% had ethical differences with the company, and 10% just didn’t like their job. Only 7% of respondents needed a different schedule, 3% didn’t get along with co-workers, and just 3% said they haven’t ever left their job.

Looking over this summary of our poll results leads to the question, how can employees fix these issues?  Is leaving a job the only answer?  It’s understandable that not everyone will get along, and at some point people will decide to leave their job because they just don’t fit in. Maybe, they don’t have the right skills, or the schedule has changed and become challenging, but is there more that can be done instead of just moving on?

Talk to Your Supervisor
Even though you may not get along with the people in charge, before you quit, or if you’ve even thought about quitting, talk to your supervisor. Let that person in leadership know what’s going on. If you don’t like the job you’re doing let them know; they may have a new task they need you to work on. If you don’t get along with someone in the team you’re working with, let your supervisor know. There may be a different project you could work on that could totally change your outlook on your job and brighten your mood. There could be a promotion right around the corner, so keep working hard and doing your best.

Things at work may not always be wonderful, but don’t give up at the first sign of difficulty. Have you stayed at a job even though you haven’t always liked it? What did you learn in that process? Let us know in the comments section below.

Job Search Lessons from 2014 Olympics

Gold_Medal_Feb2014Do you have aspirations of getting a better job or growing your career? Watching the Olympics could help. Every time the Olympic Games roll around, I enjoy watching different athletes from across the world compete, and I anticipate seeing my favorite athletes win gold. This year, that was not the case for one of my favorite sports to watch: snowboarding. But instead of turning off the TV as soon as I realized my favorite snowboarder and two-time gold medalist, Shaun White, wasn’t going to place, I decided to stay tuned in to see who won. Here are some of the lessons I learned.

Get Back Up and Don’t Give Up

It’s a tough fact of life to learn; you don’t always win, no matter how hard you try or how far in advance you prepare. That fact was made evident during the final halfpipe competition in Sochi. While watching the Olympics, I was reminded that no matter how much a professional athlete prepares, they may not win, but that doesn’t mean they give up. Soon after the halfpipe competition was over, Shaun was interviewed and asked what happened. Instead of blaming it on the snow or the conditions, he said he’d be back next time and he was happy for the guys who did well! What a great attitude to have! We can learn so much from that statement itself. Just because you haven’t landed a job or moved up in your company as fast as you’d like, it doesn’t mean you need to give up or stop trying. The agony of defeat is never easy to handle, but getting back up, working hard, and trying again will help improve your skills and chances of getting that new job or promotion you’ve been looking for.

Learn from Your Mistakes

Unfortunately, making mistakes is a normal part of life. Failure even happens to the best of the best. What’s important to learn from Olympic winners and even those who won’t be taking home a medal is that these athletes don’t let mistakes defeat them. In fact, you’ll probably see many of the same athletes in four years at the next Winter Olympics. It’s important to learn from your mistakes, make the corrections that are needed, and use those lessons to help shape your future. If you’ve been looking for a new job for a while or if you’re ready to go to the next level in your current job, take a look back at what has been slowing you down in the past or getting you off track and work to take care of those mistakes so you won’t drag that baggage with you to the next level. Also, seek feedback from co-workers or friends and make necessary changes.

What are some lessons you’ve learned from the Olympics? Share with us in the comments section below!

What to Look For In Career Technology Education

Career_Technology_Jan2014_webWhether you’re considering expanding your education for the first time or wanting to learn a new trade, your local career technology school could be just what you’re looking for. A career technology education often provides quality training for less time and money than more formal university programs. And, with Harvard University’s 2011 “Pathways to Prosperity” report showing that more than 25% of those holding post-secondary licenses or certificates from a career technology education earn more than the average bachelor’s degree recipient, getting a career technology education is a great way to further your career and increase your earning potential.

If you do decide to attend a career technology education, you still need to do a little research to make sure you’re choosing the best one for your needs. Here are four things to keep at the top of your checklist as you make your decision.

The Program You Want
Not all career technology education’s offer the same programs and certifications, so start out by finding the ones that offer what you’re looking for. If you aren’t quite sure what type of career you’re interested in, career technology schools are also great places to try different fields of work until you find one that fits. According to the New York Times, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that “of the 30 jobs projected to grow at the fastest rate over the next decade in the United States, only seven typically require a bachelor’s degree.” So you might take job security, projected growth, and earning potential into consideration as you decide on a program.

A Price You Can Afford
One of the best aspects of a career technology education is its affordability. “Because trade and technical schools are often directly tied into the employment needs of their region or state, prospective students can find low cost or free programs,” Mary Docken, director of market development at Hobsons, an education solutions firm, told Fox Business News. It is important to compare all the career technology schools within driving distance to see if one is cheaper than the others or if one has better scholarships or financial aid options.

Quality Teachers
Once you decide on your area of study, take a look at the various career technology teachers. What type of training do they have? Have they worked in the real world? What’s their reputation among their students? Often times, the instructors are more down to earth and approachable than university professors. “Instructors are usually well seasoned professionals with direct experience in the field, which is often not the case in the traditional college setting,” Erin Davis, director at McGraw-Hill Higher Education, said in a Fox Business News article.

A Good Reputation
Attending a career technology school that has a good reputation with local professionals and employers is critical if you want to maximize your chances of quickly landing a job after completing your training. So try to talk with some potential employers and find out what schools and programs they prefer to hire from. When a career technology school has a good enough reputation, some employers will even hire students before they graduate.

Just because career technology schools don’t receive all the hype that universities often do doesn’t mean they aren’t a great, viable option for you. Many of the jobs you can receive training for from a career technology school will provide stable, well-paying careers. And, even if you were already proficient in your field of work, sometimes getting that formal certification is what it takes to make you stand out from other job seekers.

Did you attend a career technology school and now have a great job? Do you think career technology schools can prepare you for a career just as well as universities? Let us know in the comments sections below.

What You Should be Sharing on LinkedIn

PRD12MOV_POLL-ICON_100X100LinkedIn is a social media network that is focused on the networking of business professionals. As of June 2013, LinkedIn reported more than 225 million acquired users in over 200 countries. One purpose of the site is to allow users to maintain a list of contacts with whom they have some level of relationship, these are called Connections. With your LinkedIn connections, you can share thoughts, articles or other content-rich websites from several places. This is known as posting an update or sharing an update. You can use the share box, located on your profile, to share a wide variety of information also.

You can browse through LinkedIn’s job search page and find jobs from accounting to human resources to sales jobs.  You can also search for jobs in specific locations.
If you’re looking for a job or just looking to network, LinkedIn is a great social media tool to help you. If you’re new to social media and LinkedIn, here is a tutorial to help you get started. It’s important to set up professional work-related social media profiles. This will help you build a professional image with future employers when they research your name. Check out this blog for more tips on job searching.

Your updates may be shared with your LinkedIn connections via email depending on their email settings. Learn more about adjusting your email settings.

Have you landed a job through LinkedIn? Share with us in the comment section below.