Tag Archives: job seekers

Surprising Facts About Workplace Friendships

EntryLevelLifeButton_A When you’re in the workforce, a large part of your day – and your week – is spent on the job. And having friends in the workplace can help make your workday more enjoyable. When you have friends in the workplace, it gives you somebody to talk to, brainstorm ideas with, and generally helps improve your overall productivity. According to a survey in Business Wire, 70 percent of all individuals surveyed said friendships create a more supportive and friendly environment to work in, while 56 percent said it increases workplace morale.

Although some workplace friendships can transition into lifelong friendships outside of the office, other times they can backfire and cause more harm than good. When that happens, it can lead to feelings of awkwardness between those involved and have a negative impact on careers and office environments. When it comes to developing friendships in the workplace, you don’t have to avoid them. But, it is important to be a little cautious. So here are a few words of advice to help  keep your workplace friendships happy and healthy.

Remember there’s work to do. You and your co-workers have tasks and duties to perform throughout the day and you have goals to meet. Make it a point to not spend your day around the office cooler gossiping about what company news you’ve heard. If you want to talk and catch up on what’s going on with your office buddies, reserve a few minutes at the beginning of your day, go to lunch together, or talk at designated break times. Just keep in mind that too much socializing throughout the day, especially when there are deadlines to meet, can cause strain and stress on your team, your job, and your friendship.

Be careful about what information you share. If you hang out with co-workers outside of work, be careful about what personal information you share, especially if you don’t want that information shared with other co-workers. Also make sure you don’t talk about other co-workers, supervisors, or the company. Depending on how well you know that person, what you say could get back to the office.

Don’t let the friendship take advantage of you. With friendships in the workplace, you might run into a situation where a friend wants some help with their daily tasks. It’s fine to help them out, but within reason. If they need help with some software, want to bounce an idea off you, need to switch lunch hours so they can leave a little early for a doctor’s appointment, these are examples of when it’s OK to help. But, if they’re wanting you to help cover up a mistake for them, wanting you to give them less constructive feedback, or slacking on their productivity and asking you to take on some of their work, these are examples of no-no’s. Being friends does not mean playing favorites at work. You have a job to do and so do they.

Friends are great to have at work. Just remember that at work, you have to keep your actions professional because you have a job to do first and foremost. Apply these tips to your job to ensure you develop quality relationships with others in the workplace without adding to workplace frustrations.

What Do Your Social Media Sites Reveal About You?

EntryLevelLifeButton_E Facebook. Twitter. LinkedIn. How many of these social media networking sites are you using? One? All three? More? Today, social media is a hot topic when it comes to making connections. But, these sites are not just useful for socializing with friends and peers. You can also use them to help build your personal brand and aid your job search. Employers are becoming savvy in using these tools in the recruiting process. When it comes to hiring managers, 53% use social networks to perform background checks on employees, so it’s important to keep your social media sights professional, because you never know which employer could be looking at you.

So, take a minute to freshen up on the overall purpose of the three most popular social networks and learn general rules for professional social networking.

Facebook. 
Facebook is primarily a place where people can socialize and connect with friends and family. You can upload pictures, post videos, and update your status to keep people aware of what you’re doing. You can control who sees what on Facebook – to an extent. This site has developed many new features since its humble beginning as a way for students at Harvard to stay in touch. Facebook quickly expanded so that any student with a college e-mail address could participate. From there, it grew to allow anyone with an e-mail address to be able to join Facebook. Today, your friends, professors, elementary school teachers, bosses, and possibly even your parents are on Facebook. This year, Facebook beat out Google as one of the most searched websites in the U.S.
 
LinkedIn.
LinkedIn is more professional than Facebook. It is designed to showcase your resume, skills, and contacts. The site also enables you to stay in touch with colleagues and helps you network with other professionals in your field or industry of interest. On this site, the profile focus is primarily on you skills, experience, aspirations, and expertise. what you do for a living, or what you would like to do, and showcasing your résumé online.

Twitter. 
Twitter allows you to post short messages, information, links, and more in real time to your followers. You can choose whose tweets you want to follow and allow others to follow yours as well, unless you have your profile set to private. Twitter messages “tweets” are just short – 140 characters or less. An example of a tweet is: Downtown for the marketing association’s annual convention. Each tweet is updated on each follower’s home page, allowing them to see your message, share it, or reply back to it. It’s a great, and quick way, to find information, connect with those in your field of interest, and showcase your knowledge.

General Rules.
Did you know that 53% of all hiring managers use social networks to perform background checks on employees? So, if you interviewed for a job and end up being one of the top candidates, some employer may search your online references, such as Facebook and LinkedIn to learn more about you. If they looked at your Facebook profile, what would your pictures tell a potential employer about you? 

An estimated 80% of employers want employees and job candidates to know how to use social networking tools.
 
If you don’t have any social networking profiles created, it’s never too late to get started. LinkedIn is focused on sharing your resume and skills with others. Twitter is a great account to sign up for because it allows you to easily and quickly share information at once. Facebook is mainly used to help you connect with friends and family, so use this account cautiously as a job seeker.

The more connections you have, the better. Just keep in mind to actually focus on building quality relationships with your connections. Start placing more focus on your social media networks today and start growing your contacts.

Using Twitter to Help Your Job Search

In this day and time, there are many online social networking sites you can use to aid in your job search. And no matter which social media site you prefer, when used to it’s full potential, finding a job can be just a few connections, tweets, or friend requests away.

One particular social networking site that has gained popularity not only among individuals over the past year, but with employers as well, is Twitter. With job boards becoming overcrowded with job ads, employers have flocked to Twitter to list job openings. It’s not only more economical for businesses, but it also allows prospective employers to target social-media savvy job seekers.

If you’re looking for a competitive edge in the job market, try these tips in utilizing Twitter to help in your job search.

Create a professional profile. To get started, first create a professional profile on your Twitter account that lists your experience and expertise. Experts suggest putting a job pitch in your Twitter bio to help attract prospective employers. You can also link to a professional blog or profile on another networking site for more exposure, such as your personal LinkedIn account.

Post tweets. Before you connect with anyone, make sure you have something intriguing to say. Don’t tweet about what you ate for breakfast – instead, tweet about the industry you’re trying to land a job in, an idea that invites interest, or share a link to an intriguing article of substance. Once you have some substantial tweets on your account, you’re ready to connect with business leaders and other Twitter followers in your industry. 

Connect with recruiters and businesses. Once your Twitter account is created and you have tweets posted, start connecting with prospective employers and recruiters. This will help give you a heads up on potential job openings as well as an inside look into company chatter. And, don’t stop with hiring managers and recruiters. Connect with employees of companies you’re interested in. Also, connect with professionals from your industry and metro area so you are expanding your offline network to your online presence. This will give you even more networking opportunities and a leg up if a job does arise because you will know more people on the inside.

Educate yourself on Twitter applications. Twitter is not a difficult tool to learn, but there are several applications you can use to assist you in your job search. Check out these 15 Twitter applications that will help you get the most value out of your Twitter account and increase your chances of job search success.

The growing popularity of Twitter and the benefits offered are luring more than just social-media minded individuals. This site is attracting job seekers, employers looking for prospective employees, recruiters, and industry leaders. This social media site allows job seekers to meet in an informal setting and interact one-on-one with recruiters and hiring managers without an awkward feeling of trying to connect with professionals, like on other social media networking sites. So, try these tips when setting up your Twitter account to help in your job search.

For more job search, career, and workplace advice, follow Express on Twitter today.

Seeker or Sleeper: What’s Your Job Search Style

Have you ever thought about the differences between superstars and slouches? We usually think about separating the high achievers from the low performers on the job, but it pertains to job seekers as well.

The three indicators discussed in The Key Differences between Superstars and Slouches can also relate to the different styles of people searching for jobs.

First, people who find jobs understand that finding a job is a full-time position. They devote an 8-hour workday to the process. They wake up in the morning, get ready for the day, and start their job search bright and early. They filter through employment opportunities, compiling a list of prospective employers to submit their résumés to. They don’t allow past failures or a sluggish economy to get in the way of finding a job.

Second, successful job seekers usually are relentless in their job search process. They pound the pavement looking for employment opportunities wherever they can find them. They don’t limit their job search to certain hours of the day. After they submit applications and résumés, they follow up with phone calls to ensure that potential employers have received all necessary documents and request a time for an interview. They don’t wait around with fingers crossed.

Third, job getters are the ones who don’t make excuses for the lack of employment opportunities. They understand the obstacles that stand in their way. Whether it’s a down economy, a competitive job market, or a lack of qualifications inhibiting their job search success, they reevaluate the situation and determine solutions.

The job search process may take longer than would have a year ago, but there are still jobs available. The difference is the job seeker. Successful job seekers process these three key elements, and the sleepers, well um, they sleep. So, don’t give up and fall into a job search slumber.

Check out your local Express office today for help in the job search process.