Tag Archives: job

4 Hot Summer Jobs

Summer is just around the corner, and it’s a great time to start searching for a job to fill your time off. Since summer jobs are important to build your resume and help you network, finding the right fit is essential. To get started on your job search, check out these four jobs that are popular during the summer months!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

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Moving On After a Job Break Up

movin_on_after_job_breakup_webGetting fired, laid off, or quitting a job can be a very rough time. If this happens to you, chances are you’ll be faced with some negative emotions and anxiety about your future. Starting a new job search while you’re under so much stress can be difficult, but there are steps you can take to lessen the blow. Check out these tips to help you move on after a job break up.

Give yourself time to let it sink in.
Often, leaving a job comes with negative emotions. These emotions are normal, but you can’t bounce back and find a new job if you’re still focusing on negative thoughts and memories. You need to be positive and enthusiastic about new opportunities in order to land your next job, so make sure you allow yourself time to work through the feelings that come with being let go. Go for a walk, take up a new hobby, or lean on family or friends to help you cope before you take the next step.

Learn from your mistakes.
If you were let go from a job because of something you did – or didn’t do – take some time to think about what went wrong and how you can stop it from happening again. Try to find lessons you can learn from the situation. If you were let go because of company problems, like financial troubles or a change in management, those lessons can be harder to find. But, there are always things you can do to improve your future employability. Remember to think of the positives this change may bring. Perhaps now you can explore a new career path, reassess your strengths and weaknesses, go back to school, or find a company that will allow you to move up in your career.

Start planning.
Starting a new job search can be intimidating, and you may not be sure where to begin. According to Amy Shouse from LearnVest, a financial planning company, start by writing down every place you’d like to work. Regardless of where these companies are located or if you have the education or experience to work there, put them on your list of dream jobs. Then, do at least five things every day that will work toward landing one of those dream jobs. Research companies, make calls, submit applications, and find places to network.

Be ready to talk about the job in interviews.
Although it’s not always easy to talk about former employers, you need to be prepared when an interviewer asks the inevitable question: “Why did you leave your last job?” Remember to avoid badmouthing your previous boss, always remain honest and open with your answer, and try to show your strengths to the interviewer. For more tips on answering this question, check out this Movin’ On Up article.

Remain professional.
Regardless of why you are leaving the company, remember to exit gracefully. Since networking and references are an important part of the workplace, you don’t want to burn any bridges you may need down the road. And don’t broadcast your feelings on social media either. While it may be tempting to let your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn friends know how upset you are, it’s best to avoid saying anything negative about your previous job. These social accounts are easily searchable by potential employers, and you don’t want to air any dirty laundry that could prevent you from landing an interview. If you have to get all of your negative emotions out, rely on a friend you can trust instead of social media.

Consider volunteering.
Looking for your next job may take longer than you expected. Since you don’t want long gaps on your resume that show you were out of work, consider volunteering to an organization in your community during your job search. In addition to giving back and feeling good about your part in the community, volunteering also offers many benefits to your job search. When you volunteer, you have the opportunity to network and meet new people, learn new skills, and gain experience to add to your resume.

Although moving on from a job break up can be tough, it doesn’t have to be. How have you bounced back from losing a job? Let us know in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Poll: How Soon After Graduation Did You Get a Job?

MOV_POLL-ICONWhich is more important: education or experience? It’s an age-old question that has been researched and debated for decades, but one that doesn’t necessarily have a clear-cut answer. While the results from Glassdoor’s recent 2014 Employment Confidence Survey suggest that 82% of U.S. college graduates who were employed on a full or part time basis believed that their level of education has been an asset to their careers, 72% believe that specialized training outside of a traditional college degree is more valuable when it comes to the workplace.

Last year, we asked Movin’ On Up readers how their education has affected their career path. While the results of this poll were illuminating in the education vs. experience debate, we want to know how quickly recent graduates are being added to the workforce. To help determine how long a graduate typically spends looking for a job after going through the higher education process, we want to know how soon after graduation you landed a job. Let us know by voting in our poll!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

St. Patrick’s Day: Lucky Breaks in the Workplace

st_patricks_day_lucky_breaks_webDo you ever feel like some people are just lucky, especially when it comes to their professional life? Somehow they get all the attention and wind up getting promoted, all the while you faithfully show up every day, do what’s asked of you, and are still in the same position you started out in. It’s understandable why you may feel unlucky, but the reality is that the professional world doesn’t work that way. An article from the Huffington Post lays it out like this: “While many employees do fine work, exceeding expectations in one’s day-to-day activities is not enough to get ahead. Rather, those who capture promotions are driven internally to strive for more.”

However, when you’re in the trenches, it’s easy to assume that someone else’s promotion was for less admirable reasons. “She managed to land the hot projects and got all the glory.” “He only got his promotion because he’s friends with the boss.” “She was always given the leadership roles.”  But, there may be more to the story than these natural assumptions, and chances are the promotion probably had nothing to do with luck.

Landed the Hot Projects
Maybe she did get handed some of the high-profile projects, but you need to ask yourself “why?” Most likely she acted and worked in a way that caused her manager to trust her with bigger and bigger tasks. So, you need to do that too. A Chicago Tribune article recommends anyone desiring a future promotion to “Show initiative by volunteering for projects, either within your department, on a cross-functional team, or a temporary job detail. Project work will give you an opportunity to gain more experience, showcase your skills to a broader group, expand your network, and gain even greater name recognition.” Sometimes it really is as simple as asking for projects and showing you’re a dependable, solutions-focused, hard worker.

Buddies With The Boss
Having a close relationship with top-level executives and learning from your boss can legitimately play a role in getting promoted. Generally, people recommend people they like, even if it gets labeled as “office politics.” “Much of what is dismissed as ‘politics’ is simply part of the job description – being a good communicator,” Forbes explains. “Being visible. Being helpful. Building relationships. You can’t be a leader without doing those things.”  The Chicago Tribune suggests getting a mentor because that person “can also be instrumental in spreading positive press by championing your skills, talents, and abilities throughout the organization to the right people.”

Always The Team Leader
Once again, she was handed leadership roles in projects and within the team for a reason. Attitude, track record, dependability, passion, and drive all factor into whether or not a manager trusts you enough to give you a chance at leadership. And usually that leadership role will start out small, and then as you prove yourself the roles will grow. As the Forbes article states, “You don’t become a leader by being promoted. You get promoted because you are a leader.” It’s up to you to find a way to prove your leadership ability.

Getting a promotion rarely has anything to do with the luck and everything to do with hard work. “People who are recognized and promoted are those who make an effort and stand out in their organization,” affirms Huffington Post. “They are go-getters who are fearless in taking on a new challenge, and they constantly challenge the status quo.” So your best bet for landing that promotion is to stop wishing on a four-leaf clover and start hustling instead.

How have you worked hard to receive a promotion? Share your stories in the comments section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

The Results Are In: What Is the Key Factor That Contributes to Your Job Satisfaction?

results_job_satisfaction_webNow that 2015 is well underway, many job seekers are focusing on their goal of finding a job this year. As job search efforts increase, it’s important to recognize and understand the key factors that contribute to job satisfaction so you know that the job you’re trying to get is the right one for you. To help determine the factors that go into job satisfaction, we recently polled Movin’ On Up readers and the results are in!

Keys to Job Satisfaction
The most important factor that contributes to job satisfaction, according to 32% of poll respondents, is “engaging or meaningful work.” “Feeling valued” was a close second with 29% of the votes. “Job security” was the most important factor for 11% of respondents, while “compensation” and “room for advancement” received 10% and 7% of the votes, respectively. Only 4% of people considered “company benefits” to be a key factor in their job satisfaction, along with 2% of those who chose “leadership.”

Additionally, 5% of respondents selected the “Other” option in our poll and left responses including:

  • Efficient communication
  • Pleasant atmosphere
  • Co-workers and managers who are nice to work with
  • Good planning, organization, and control
  • Flexibility
  • Acquiring new skills
  • All of the above

What Leaders Think
Interestingly, it seems there may be a disconnect between a company’s decision makers and those trying to secure a job there. On Refresh Leadership, the Express blog for business leaders, we asked the same question and the results were very different. While 26% of leaders agree with job seekers that “engaging or meaningful work” is the most important factor in job satisfaction, that’s where the similarities end. In fact, while only 2% of Movin’ On Up readers said “leadership” was a key factor, 14% of employers chose this answer. Additionally, 19% of employers chose “compensation,” while only 10% of Movin’ On Up readers agreed, and “company benefits” gained 11% of employer votes, but only 4% of job seeker votes.

Your Job Search
Though there does seem to be a divide between what business leaders and job seekers value most when it comes to job satisfaction, you should keep these results in mind when you’re looking for a job. Were you one of the majority of respondents who selected “engaging or meaningful work” as the key factor to your job satisfaction? If so, try to use this as a determining factor in your job search. For example, if you are interviewing with a company, ask the interviewer what he or she enjoys most about their job. Look for ways that the job can inspire you or help you give back to the community. If you chose “leadership” or “room for advancement,” you can inquire about these elements of the job during an interview by asking questions that show your interest in the position. You may even be able to determine some factors, such as compensation and company benefits, through the job posting. While getting a job is a nice start to the year, ensuring that you’ll be satisfied with your work is even better.

How do you plan to use these results to help with your job search? Let us know in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Be a Leader on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

COM14SM_MLK_504X504_JobseekerOne of the greatest leaders in American history was Martin Luther King, Jr. His leadership, influence, and impact on the civil rights movement was so memorable that he has a day dedicated in his honor – Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Observed on the third Monday of January, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is a federal holiday marking the birthday of the fallen leader and offering a way to honor his contributions to American society. To date, King is the only non-president to receive a national holiday dedicated in his honor.

Martin Luther King, Jr. remains famous for his role in the modern American Civil Rights Movement in the 50s and 60s. He stood for nonviolent resistance and worked to end poverty and international conflict until his assassination in April of 1968.

A powerful leader, Martin Luther King, Jr. inspired people across the world with his relentless spirit and tenacity. But, King’s influence did not end in the 60s. In fact, today’s job seekers can still take advice from the famous activist. As King himself showed, you don’t have to be in a leadership position to make a difference and enact a positive change. With determination, a strong work ethic, and an end goal in mind, you too can have a very powerful dream.

As King said, “Whatever your life’s work is, do it well.”

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.