Tag Archives: managers

Managers: What to Look for When Hiring Your Next Employee Post COVID-19

As local economies slowly recover from the slowdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, some business leaders are looking to start bringing jobs back to meet anticipated demands in their markets. Hiring managers have a large talent pool to choose from these days. But with so many qualified individuals, how can you make sure you choose the right employee? Poor hiring can cost an employer up to 150% of a workers’ salary, so before you decide to hire your next employee, it’s important to know what to look for in a perfect hire.

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4 Tips New Managers Need to Know to Succeed

Your first managerial position can be both exciting and nerve-wracking. You want to show your company that you were the right choice for this promotion, but sometimes it can be hard to figure out where to start.

You may face some growing pains when you get started, so the key thing to remember is that you’re new to this management thing. It’s okay to take time to adjust to the role. Here are a few things to keep in mind.

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Is Your Boss a Creativity Killer? Take Our Poll

Job Seeking and Career Advice PollA recent CareerBuilder study found that only 41% of employees believe their managers inspire creativity at the workplace while 64% of leaders believed they do.

Engaging with company leaders is important to your professional development. It provides an environment that allows you to express your creativity, giving you the ability to handle bigger and better projects. We want to know if your creativity is encouraged or stifled at work. Let us know in the survey, and share any stories about workplace creativity in the comments section below.

You Texted What?

R u a txtr? Text messaging has become one of the most common ways people communicate. Research conducted by Nielsen Wire, found that more than 2.5 billion texts are sent daily in the U.S. And according to a recent article on MSNBC.com’s Technoblog, 87% of teens and 72% of adults are text messaging.

Today, texting seems to be the communication tool of choice for many because it’s easy to do and quicker than calling someone to have a conversation.  For example, you can send a quick text to tell someone something like C U @ 545 instead of getting caught in a long conversation.

But, texting isn’t just for personal use anymore. It’s being used more and more in the workplace and becoming a common communication tool between managers and employees. Some managers are OK with allowing employees to text to discuss work-related issues like taking a sick day, reporting a family emergency, or dropping a quick line to say they’re running late. But, are there some things that shouldn’t be texted? In the survey conducted by Nielsen Wire, it was also discovered that 11% of college students and recent college graduates think it’s OK to text a manager when resigning from a job.

As technology continues to change and more generations entering the workforce, communication on the job continues to change. As an employee, it’s important for you to know what your manager’s thoughts are and what your company’s policies and preferences outline regarding text messaging on the job.    
 
Does your job already have texting rules in place? Would you or have you ever texted your boss to say you’re sick or that you’re resigning? Share your thoughts with us!

Touchdown!

Tackle-boss-1 The winning story for the Touchdown with a Bad Boss Contest is The Power of HR submitted by Tracey. Over 1300 votes were cast and The Power of HR received nearly 40% of those. Communication Kick Off received 32% of the votes so it was a close game.  Tracey will receive the Football Victory Package including a 40-inch LCD TV, a $100 Visa gift card, and a tailgate party gift basket.

Thanks for submitting your stories and voting! And remember, next time you have a problem with your boss, before you storm off to the sidelines, think of a way you can score a touchdown with a win-win.

Touchdown with a Bad Boss – Week 3

Tackle-boss-1

Here are the top Bad Boss solutions for week three of our contest! Until September 1, we will be spotlighting three top solutions we've received on how employees handled a tough boss. We will be collecting stories through Friday, Aug. 27, so you still have time to submit your story! E-mail your story to boss@expresspros.com. At the end of the contest, voting will begin to determine which solution is the best. The person who receives the most votes will win the grand prize. The winner could be you!


Stay the Course

Penny started a new job and walked into a field of landmines. Due to her hiring situation, other team members and managers doubted her competence and ability, choosing to judge her before they got a chance to work with her. Her hard work and determination to do her new tasks well began to pay off after a couple of weeks. Slowly she was given the opportunity to expand her role, and her supervisor gave her a new project to work on. Penny stayed on top of the ball throughout the project and made sure to keep the supervisor up-to-date on the advances. She knew she had won over the boss and the team when she was invited to a team lunch toward the end of the project. Penny won this boss and team over by demonstrating her abilities and taking care of business!

Communication Kick-Off
At first, Vince struggled with communicating his job expectations and performance issues with his boss. However, Vince soon discovered that, while neither he nor his boss were good verbal communicators, they could express themselves well through e-mail. So, Vince started e-mailing his boss when he had a problem or issue. His boss was able to clearly see the situation written out and then give a written response in reply. This has cut down on miscommunication and made their communication process more effective and efficient.

Changing Teams
Shari began working at a new company as Sales Manager. She was ready to take her new team on to new championships. However, she met head-on with a manager who had a unique way of managing his staff. While sales members were rewarded for hitting daily sales goals, he ran a tight ship when it came to the work environment. The manager had rules about what items could be displayed on your desk, restroom breaks, and phone calls. Shari chose to handle her role with poise and grace, but after 21-days she decided her professional goals and desires did not match the company’s policies. Shari choose to seek new employment, she also choose to find her new job through Express!

Who’s Your Boss? – Understanding Leadership Styles

In every work environment, you encounter different leadership styles among managers. Some might have exceptional leaders, but others might experience a manager with not-so-great leadership. Leadership styles vary broadly from one manager to the next and from situation to situation. So, how do you know what type of leadership style your manager has? Here is a list of the most common leadership styles and a description of what they are to help you identify the type of manager you work for.

1. Authoritarian.

The authoritarian leader exudes extreme power over their employees. This leader calls all the shots and does not leave much decision making up to the team. They have a vision they want to achieve and know exactly how they’re going to get there … no matter what. With this type of leader they won’t ask employees to do something – they will tell you to do something. If so, to keep the peace, do what is asked without griping or complaining.

Leaders who fall under this category are also classified as transactional leaders. Basically, these are no-nonsense leaders who lay down the law to their employees from day one. Team members have no say and the manager doesn’t really focus on helping the team grow and develop – they just want the work done right.

2. Bureaucratic. This individual is a rule follower and makes sure that the team sticks to the rules. They don’t allow for team brainstorming or coming up with creative new ways to accomplish work. To stay on this leader’s good side, make sure you are following the rules. Over time, this leader may become comfortable with new ideas that you propose – just remember to relate them back to the company and show how they follow the rules and meet company standards.

3. Democratic. A democratic leader is the exact opposite of an authoritarian. They involve the team in decision-making processes, and take all suggestions into account when making the final decision. Also, a democratic leader is considered to be a transformational leader because they focus on the future and on positive growth at work. They want to help others become better leaders as well.

With democratic leaders, feel free to voice opinions or suggestions that you might have. Tell them why you believe in an idea or support or dislike something in the workplace. They will respect your interest in the business.

4. Laissez-Fair. A leader with this style tends to be hands off and allows the team to make all the decisions. In French, laissez-fair means “leave it be” or “let it be.” Basically, this leader leaves everything alone and puts the team in charge. However, this can create a stressful, chaotic environment that lacks direction and goes nowhere.

Unfortunately with this type of leader, they are not very interested in an organization, and there is little that an employee can do to improve the situation. An organization needs leadership to survive. If your organization is dealing with a laissez-fair leader, it might be in the best interest to elect someone into the leadership role who will be involved in the organization.

As you can see, the top leadership styles vary widely and range from the good to the bad. Apply this information to find out what type of leader you work for and to make the best of your workday.