Tag Archives: part-time

Have You Considered Phased Retirement?

You’re tired of working and ready to retire, so what’s stopping you?

Maybe you can’t afford it yet. Or perhaps you don’t want to stop working because you enjoy it. You want more time to dedicate to your family or hobbies, but aren’t quite ready to give your job up and retire. So, regardless of reason, you keep working.

The Good

But working forever isn’t the only option. There’s another way to ease out of the workforce—phased retirement.

Not sure what that means? Investopedia defines phased retirement as including “a broad range of employment arrangements that allow an employee who is approaching retirement age to continue working with a reduced workload, and eventually transition from full-time work to full-time retirement.”

In other words, phased retirement allows you to work in a part-time capacity for a certain time period before you start full-time retirement. You get to keep working for longer, while employers get the benefit of you passing on your knowledge and experience before heading off to retirement.

Sounds enticing, right?

The Bad

A study published by the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, as reported by Forbes, notes that 77% of employers believe many of their employees want to keep on working post-retirement. Forty-seven percent think employees would like to do some sort of phased retirement. The issue?

Only 31% of those same employers actually allow that shift to a phased retirement, and only 27% are okay with employees taking on jobs that are less stressful or demanding to make retirement easier.

The Solution

If you want to keep working and embrace retirement, there is still a solution through staffing companies like Express Employment Professionals.

You don’t have to pay anything to benefit from Express. All you need to do is pick up the phone and call a local office or register online. Let your employment specialist know your work availability and they’ll find you part-time positions that allow you to phase into retirement at your own pace.

For more in our retirement series, check out these helpful blogs:

Retirement: Happy 40th Birthday 401(K)

Beginner’s Guide to Retirement

Job Searching Past Retirement Age

Three Tips for Getting Your Retirement Started Off Right

Do you plan on retiring? If so, will you retire outright or opt for a phased approach? Let us know in the comments section below!

Poll Results: The Most Popular Part-Time Jobs

Which job should you choose?

Fulltime work isn’t for everyone. Some workers are at a point in their lives where they want to spend more time with their families and less time at the office. Others need to be able to balance taking care of children or sick relatives with earning a paycheck.

For those looking for something different than the traditional 8-to-5, part-time work can be a great option.

Last month we conducted a poll asking voters what type of part-time work they would consider.

The Results

Professional/office position came in first with over 27% of the votes, followed by data entry with 21%, and customer service/call center in third with 17% of the votes.

Other results included:

  • Food service: 8.5%
  • Warehousing/assembly line: 7.4%
  • Retail industry: 6%
  • Other: 3.5%
    • Choices included house cleaning, working from home, and quality engineer
  • Taxi/ridesharing driver: 1%
  • I will not consider part-time work: 1%

What does this mean?

For much of our audience, part-time work is a great choice for later in life. Industrial positions are harder to do, so desk jobs become attractive. Taking a few hours to work behind a cubicle or in a call center is worth it to be able to spend time with your family.

Headquartered in Oklahoma City, Express Employment Professionals is a leading staffing provider in the U.S and Canada with over 800 locations. If you have any questions about part-time work in your area or job search in general, feel free to contact your local Express office or fill out our online contact form.

Are you a part-timer? What kind of work do you do? Let us know in the comments section below!

 

Poll Question: What Type of Part-time Work Would You Consider?

We are all more than workers. We’re fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, grandparents, hobbyists, and so much more. Which means we need time to take care of sick kids, help our parents in their old age, or simply to pursue other passions.

But with a fulltime job, that’s not always easy. We need to get things done on a deadline; and sometimes, that means sacrificing time with our family and friends or a possible vacation opportunity.

For some, the standard five day, 8-to-5 work week just isn’t working anymore. Something more flexible is preferred, and part-time work could be the solution.

But not every type of part-time work is going to be right for all of us. What kind of part-time work would you consider?

Be Good for Goodness’ Sake!

be_good_for_goodness_sake_webEach year, employers hire hundreds of thousands of workers for temporary jobs during the holiday season. Many of those workers will be hired to stay on into the next year and some may even land a full-time job with the company.

As the holiday season draws to a close, those who work temporary or seasonal jobs should be aware that employers are watching workers to see who is productive, fits in with the company culture, and ultimately, deserves to stay.

“I guarantee managers are watching their seasonal workers closely,” said Bob Funk, CEO of Express Employment Professionals. “They’re looking to see which employees merit a full-time position. In some sense, a seasonal job is like an extended interview, so if you want to become a permanent worker, take advantage of your holiday job and show how hard-working and dedicated you are.”

If you’re working a temporary job this holiday season, take note of these four tips for turning seasonal work into a long-term job.

Work like you’re a regular.
Whether or not you’re a temporary worker, your quality of work should always be as good as or better than any core employee. If you want to turn your temporary position into a permanent one, make sure your work is consistent, timely, and done right.

Put in extra time.
A great way to impress your boss and stand out from the crowd is by showing up to work on time. If you want an employer to make a commitment to you, you have to show you’re committed to them. If you finish your work, ask for more. Be sure you demonstrate your dedication and outstanding work ethic.

Dress to impress.
A well-dressed employee can catch the eye of all the right people. When you honor your work’s dress code, you show decision makers that you value the workplace culture. And, fitting in with the norms of your work environment can go far in the eyes of your supervisors.

Be personable.
Keep your attitude in check, because how you behave will impact your chances at landing a full-time job. Employers appreciate employees who are positive, have high morale, and get along with their supervisors and co-workers. But, remember to socialize with others only when it’s appropriate.

As Bob Funk adds, “an employer knows if you’ve been bad or good, so be good for goodness’ sake!”

How do you stand out at a seasonal or temporary job? Have you been hired full-time after working such a job? Let us know in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Overcoming a Tough Job Search

overcome_tough_job_search_webMore than six years after the Great Recession, there are many people still struggling to find work and provide for their family. Last month’s U.S. jobs report shows that 2.8 million people have been unemployed for more than six months.

Maybe you’re a part of the group that has struggled to find work for a long time, or perhaps you’ve been on the job search for less time, but haven’t had any leads or positive news on the prospects of work. This is undoubtedly a tough time, but it’s important to remember a few things during your difficult job search.

1. This won’t last forever.

It may seem like you’ll never find work and that there is little reason for hope. Don’t fall into that trap! One of the worst things that can happen to your job search is thinking negatively or being surrounded by people who are discouraging.

Take proactive steps to eliminate any talk or thoughts in your life that aren’t positive and always looking to the future. Remember that every no is getting you closer to a yes. With every application, networking connection made, and interview, you have something to learn and a way to improve.

2. Your identity isn’t found in a job.

This is a hard lesson to learn, but too often we let our jobs become how we identify our value or self-worth. Unfortunately, if you place your value in something that you can lose – like a job, a car, or a home – you’ll experience a very tough identity crisis when any of those are taken out of your life without your say.

The famous phrase, “Work to live, don’t live to work,” couldn’t be more true. When you find that next job, remember that this job, just like the last one, is not the determination of your value as a person. Friends and family, your community, or faith, are what provide value in your life.

So while you may not be working right now, when you do get that next job, work hard and learn as much as you can about the job and company. But don’t make the mistake of tying your identity to the work you do for 40 hours out of the 168 you have each week.

3. Don’t try to do this alone.

Think about the last job you had. Did you know someone who worked at the company? Maybe you had a friend who reviewed your resume before you submitted it to check for typos. Or, did you meet someone who knew about the job while you were at your friend’s birthday party?

If any of those are similar to your last experience while looking for work, why do you think it will be any different now? Finding a job is a full-time job itself, and very few people work by themselves. Let your already established network of friends and family help you connect with your next job opportunity. And if you haven’t worked with one already, reach out to a staffing company and let them use their network of business connections to help you find work.

4. A part-time or temporary job could be your entry into a full-time career.

Don’t be so quick to put down the idea of working a temporary job. Often, small businesses hire people on a temporary basis to see if they will be a good fit for the team before adding them on permanently.

The next time you see a listing for a part-time job in a field you are interested in, strongly consider applying and being ready to show you’re dependable and excited to learn new skills.

How do you remain positive during a tough job search? Share your tips in the comment section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Job Posts Decoder

job_post_decoder_webDecoding job postings is the very first step in the process of finding a job, and if job seekers don’t understand what employers are looking for, their job searches may be doomed. Unless you’re very familiar with the specific company or HR lingo, it’s easy to feel confused and unsure if you should apply for the job.

Fortunately, most employers use a limited vocabulary in their position descriptions. So, as long as job seekers understand the meaning behind a handful of phrases, they can decipher what employers are trying to communicate. We’ve decoded nine popular phrases to help maximize your job search efforts.

Part Time
If a position is described as part time or PT, then it technically means it’s less than the normal 40 hours a week. According to the U.S. government’s description, a part-time job is one that requires between zero and 30 hours per week. However, many companies consider 10-20 hours part time.

Full Time
On the other hand, full time (FT) is usually considered 40 or more hours of work a week. The government has deemed anything over 30 hours as full time, though. Also, usually full-time positions come with more benefits, such as health and dental insurance, retirement, and paid time off.

Flex-schedule
Flex-schedule or flex-time refers to the ability to work a less than traditional schedule. For instance, instead of working Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., you might be able to work three 12-hour days or four 10-hour days. It can also indicate that the employer allows its employees to set their own schedules.

Tele-commuting
If you’re interested in working from home, this is one of the key words you should look for in a job posting. Tele-commuting is the ability for an employee to complete their work from home, usually by phone or computer.

Self-motivated
Employers who list self-motivated in job postings want individuals who can complete tasks and projects on their own without much direction or pressure from others. Business leaders don’t want to constantly tell employees what they need to do or what comes next, so many employers look for this quality.

People Skills
Almost every job requires employees to interact with other people, whether co-workers, customers, or suppliers. So, the term “people skills” just means you need to have the ability to effectively communicate and get along with others.

Preferred
Job postings usually list some things that are required and some that are preferred. For instance, the job description might say a high school degree is required, but some college is preferred. This shouldn’t cause you to automatically give up on that position. If something is listed as “preferred” it just means it’s something the employer would like to see, not something they must have.

Goal-oriented
Goal-oriented is sometimes another way of saying self-motivated. Someone who is goal-oriented usually wants to have specific goals and is driven to accomplish those goals, often with limited instruction or supervision. This can also mean that a business is looking for someone who’s willing to put in as much time and effort as necessary for a goal to be met.

Team Player
Some jobs are more individually-focused and some require a group effort. If a position will involve interacting with several other employees in order to accomplish tasks on a regular basis, then an employer needs a worker who can get along with everyone and work within a team.

Understanding what employers are really looking for is the first step to landing the job you want. And the good news is that, once you’ve decoded a job posting, you don’t necessarily have to match up to the description 100%. A Forbes article actually recommends that you should “consider applying if you come close to meeting about 70% of the employer’s stated specifications and salary range” because “while the employer wants the person who gets hired to have all (or most) of the skills, experience and background listed, they’re also looking for candidates who’ll be a strong fit with their organizations.” By learning to decipher job postings and apply this 70% rule, you can minimize wasted time and ensure your efforts are going to jobs that are good fits and possibilities.

Have you struggled with deciphering a job posting? What other words or phrases are confusing to you? Share your thoughts in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Top Interview Questions for Temporary Jobs

Someone Interviewing for a Temporary jobInterviews for full-time jobs are scary enough, but how do you tackle the tricky subject of answering interview questions for temporary assignments? We all have different reasons for working temporary jobs, but you may get asked a question that you don’t know how to answer in the right way. To sharpen your skills, here are some of the most commonly asked questions from staffing agencies about temporary jobs and the best ways to answer them.

Q: What interests you about working a temporary job?
This question gives you the opportunity to demonstrate that you have a plan for your career and are willing to work toward your goals. Your answer should be more than just needing a job to pay the bills or something easy to pass the time until you find long-term work. This could be a chance for you to get some experience before deciding to go to graduate school, or provide you the opportunity to work while your children are in school and stay home when they aren’t, or you may need some experience after college to decide on a career path.

Q: What characteristics do you have that make you a fit for temporary work?
Some people like variety, and it’s ok to tell an interviewer that. Temporary jobs can provide opportunities to work in different work environments. Staffing agencies look for qualified individuals who enjoy working with new people and workplaces. There’s nothing wrong with admitting that you don’t do well working in one place for an extended period of time. You’re a quick learner and enjoy experiencing new things.

Q: Are you interested in long-term or short-term assignments?
If you’re looking for long-term assignments, inform the interviewer that you are looking for positions that could get you hired full-time by the employer. You’re thinking in the long run, which translates into strong work ethics to the interviewer. If you want short-term placement, give specific times of the year that you’re looking to work. The more detailed you are, the better tailored the assignments will be to you. If you have no preference, put the focus on the desire for a job that can develop and grow your skills.

Q: How easily do you adapt into new work environments?
Everybody has a different approach. It’s important to let your interviewer know so they can place you in an environment that best fits you. You may find excitement and energy working with new people and cultures and assimilate to new jobs easily. You may be quiet at first so you can internalize (http://blog.expresspros.com/movinonup/2012/06/climbing-the-corporate-ladder-when-youre-shy-and-introverted.html) your new surroundings and duties, but quickly learn to be productive. If you have a lengthy work history, think back to how you’ve handled the different work styles and tell the interviewer how you’ve developed your own style for managing new work environments.

Q: If you were offered a full-time position, would you be interested?
If temporary work best fits you or your family, don’t feel like you have to say yes. For whatever reason, you are looking to hone your skills without being tied down to a specific job or geographic area. Even if you are looking for full-time work with an employer, you should always tell the interviewer that it would depend on if the job and company is the right fit (http://blog.expresspros.com/movinonup/2012/02/warning-signs-an-employer-may-not-be-for-you.html) for you.

What are some questions you have been asked in temporary job interviews? Share them in the comments section below.