Tag Archives: resume tips

Santa Checks His List Twice; Have You Looked at Your Resume?

Don’t get coal in your job search stocking.

Interviews are scary. But if you have a great resume, interviewers better watch out, because a well-qualified applicant is coming to town.

A good resume does half of the work for you. Your interviewer will know your skills and accomplishments, so all you have to do in the formal interview is show that your personality and preferred workplace culture are in line with those of the company.

Here are a few things to keep in mind as you prepare your resume for the new year. (more…)

Top 10 Posts of 2017

Your favorite MOU blogs from the past year

2017 is over, and it was a big year for Movin’ On Up. With nearly 141,000 page-views in 2017 and a grand total of 3,398 comments since our inception, we’re growing fast. And it’s all thanks to you!

Our staff is made up of writers and industry experts who want to see you succeed. That’s why we’re here. It’s our job to help you build a great career. As a thank you for coming to see us every week, we’ve put together a list of our top 2017 blogs.

Thank you, and good luck in 2018!

Interview Tips: Do This, Don’t Do That

You’ve spent days applying and sent in what feels like a thousand resumes. And now you finally have an interview. We’re here to help. Review this list of dos and don’ts to ace that next interview!

How to Deal with a Difficult Boss

Discovering that your boss doesn’t respect your expertise can ruin your work ethic and drain your enthusiasm. But if you aren’t in a position to quit, here are a few ways to excel, even with a disrespectful boss.

4 Secrets to Getting a Pay Raise

Asking for a raise isn’t easy and preparing to ask can be nerve-racking. When should you ask for one? How much should you ask for? Here are our top four tips for negotiating a raise.

Reasons You May Never Retire

Traditionally, retirement was expected. You put in the extra hours while you were young so that you would have the freedom to do whatever you wanted in your later years. But that’s no longer the case.

Resume Tips to Impress Your Interviewer

If you really want to stand out, you need to add something extra to your resume. After all, you can’t make an impression without an interview. In this blog, we focus on the little things you can do with your resume to truly stand out.

How to Tell Your Interviewer You Were Fired

Yeah, you were fired. But does the interviewer really need to know that? Yup. Here’s why.

Why You Shouldn’t Give Up On Your Job Search

The job search is the internet equivalent of cold calling: knocking on doors and hoping someone is interested in your product. Every time you fail to get an interview or don’t make it to the next round, it can feel like a personal insult. But that doesn’t mean you should give up!

Why Companies Don’t Respond After an Interview

Why would a company skip out on the goodwill a well-meaning rejection email can generate? Although we personally feel companies should always send out courtesy rejection emails, here are a few reasons why they might not.

Age Discrimination in the job Search

Age discrimination in the job search is a problem. After all, you can’t change your age—it’s a part of who you are. What can you do?

5 Low Cost Ways to Develop Your Skills

Acquiring new talents and abilities doesn’t have to clean out your bank account or leave you drowning in debt. Here are a few affordable ways to develop your skills.

Anything you want to see a blog about in 2018? Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

 

 

Take the Luck Out of Resume-building

Top topics to consider when writing a resume

Lucky  ResumeYou send off a resume with a sigh, knowing it could be one of hundreds that pass in front of a hiring manager or HR representative. With odds like that, it can seem like getting an interview is down to the luck of the draw. Hopefully they’ll notice your killer font choice and professional formatting.

But what content needs to be included on a resume to make it truly stand out?

Experience

Employers always look for applicable experience for the job they’re trying to fill. That’s a given. So it’s important to highlight any experience that matches the job, even though you think it may not apply. For example, someone new to the job market who has experience in another field should think creatively about how time spent in other roles applies to the desired position. Mention any teamwork lessons learned from volunteering with a non-profit or leadership skills gained from work in a different field.

Soft Skills

This is a term that gets thrown around quite a bit in the business world. But what exactly does it mean?  Soft skills are the characteristics or attributes that allow you to effectively work with others.

Think of these as “people skills.” A professional attitude, ability to problem-solve in a group, leadership skills, etc. Instead of expertise with a certain software or tool, soft skills highlight an individual’s ability to thrive in a communal work environment.

There are many ways to highlight specific soft skills on a resume. When describing a previous position, note your ability to communicate with upper management about changes that helped with production. If problem solving is a major strength, provide an example of when you assisted an employer with a specific problem and describe the outcome.

Digital Footprint

An online presence is basically required for both individuals and businesses these days. But an unprofessional Facebook post or embarrassing Instagram pic can cost an applicant a job.

What does this have to do with resume-building? On a basic level, if your skill set involves writing or graphic work of any kind, a resume should include links to an online portfolio. If the application is for a social media position, you’ll want to include links to any personal or professional social media pages.

On a higher level, an applicant’s online presence is an invisible portion of her resume. A 2016 CareerBuilder survey showed that 60% of employers use social networking sites to research job candidates.  A quick Google search is the next step after approving a suitable resume. So give your online social life a thorough cleaning. If the position is in the business world, make sure to create or update a LinkedIn account as well. A professional applicant without LinkedIn is similar to a business without a website. It just looks bad.

The path toward a new career takes time and hard work

Luck doesn’t have anything to do with it. Which is why you need to leverage every possible strength. Think outside of the box and find the qualities that make you the best candidate for the job.

If you’re looking to expand your job search, Express Employment Professionals is a leading staffing provider in the U.S. and Canada. We employed a record 510,000 people in 2016. If you have any questions about your job search, contact a local Express office or fill out our online contact form.

Have any resume-building tips to share? Let us know in the comments section below.

 

EXCLUSIVE INSIDER INFORMATION: HOW TO SCORE AN INTERVIEW AND GET YOUR RESUME NOTICED!

If you’re looking for a job, you’re well aware that the competition is fierce. With so many applicants competing for a single job, standing out from the crowd is a daunting task. You may be the most qualified, best educated, highly trained, hardest working people-person to ever apply for the position. But if you don’t catch the eye of the hiring manager, he or she may never know what a fantastic employee you would be.

“Sometimes it can seem like there’s no rhyme or reason for why an applicant does not get an interview, but there are a few things you can do to improve your chances. And clearly, the most important thing to do is to submit a formal application in the first place,” said Bob Funk, CEO and Chairman of the Board of Express Employment Professionals. “As our survey also shows, cleverness can pay off. Be careful though, as not every hiring manager wants a resume in a gift box. But in a crowded field, creativity can make the difference.”

Express surveyed nearly 400 businesses to help you learn how applicants secure job interviews, some of the cleverest ways job seekers submit applications, and why some applicants do not get interviews. Read on for insider information that just may give you the winning edge in your job search.

Getting the Interview
Hiring decision makers in our survey were asked, “What are the best ways for an applicant to get a job interview with your company?” Overwhelmingly, the top response was simply, “applying and submitting a resume” offered by 23% of respondents.  Another 12% said a referral was the top way to secure an interview. “Apply online” was the third most popular method recommended by our experts with 10%. Finally, 8% of respondents recommend making a phone call.

Get Creative
In past articles, we’ve shared tips on how to make your resume stand out from the crowd. But some job applicants take things a step further. We asked our business leaders to describe a clever way in which someone submitted a resume. Here’s a list of the most memorable and creative.

  • A binder with a portfolio of projects
  • A PowerPoint presentation with audio and video
  • A YouTube video
  • A resume folded into a paper airplane
  • A gift package containing the resume

Other respondents mentioned an applicant walking in as a customer before revealing their interest in a job. Another manager received a call recommending someone for the job—only to find out the caller was recommending herself.

Interview Deal Breakers
On the flip side, survey respondents were asked, “What are the main reasons an applicant does not get a job interview with your company?” “Lack of experience” topped the list at 16%, followed closely by “lack of skills/qualifications” at 15%.

If your sights are set on a particular job or career path, explore ways to get the training necessary to be considered a qualified applicant. Do some research to find out what it will take to get where you want to be and investigate entry level jobs that are good stepping stones on your career path. You may not be where you’d like to be today, but with effort and determination, you will get there!

Have you ever tried a unique way to get an interview or get your resume noticed? How did it go?

Share your experience in the comments section!

score_an_interview

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

 

 

Dust the Cobwebs off Your Resume

cobwebs_webWhen people tell you that looking for a job is a full-time job in itself, they aren’t kidding. It usually takes a scary amount of time and energy to search for opportunities, network, prepare for interviews, actually interview, and then follow up. But the truth is, as much as we dread it, looking for a job is a job that we’re all doing more and more often.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average number of years employees stay at one company is just under five. So, even if you aren’t currently in the market for a new job, chances are you will be in the near future.  That’s why it’s so important to constantly keep your resume up to date. You never know when you might need it again.

If it’s been a little while since your resume has seen the light of day, it may be time to get it out and dust it off. Here are a couple of tips to help you get started.

1. Don’t Be Afraid to Cut Stuff Out

Before you start adding to your resume, check to see if there’s anything that can or should be taken out. Objective statements for example are now seen as obsolete. If you still have one, consider cutting it out and replacing with a list of your skills set instead. Need another example of cutting stuff out? If you’ve been out of high school for a few years, it’s probably time to delete any mention of your old stomping grounds.

Take some time to really think through what you include from your past. Your resume should be succinct and, at the same time, powerful, so there may be some parts of your resume that could be restructured to have a stronger impact.

2. Update Your Resume with Relevant and Valuable Information

After you’ve cut out any unnecessary information, it’s time to start updating your resume with new awards, achievements, and skills. Because you only have one to two pages max to demonstrate your work experience and knowledge, remember that every word counts. Craft your resume carefully with power words like these.

As you describe your work experience, try to stay focused on your accomplishments rather than tasks. Share measurable information about how you’ve made a difference in the companies you’ve worked at, whether that’s how much you’ve increased sales or a problem you solved for your former employers.

3. Keep it Updated As You Move Forward

Every time you win a new award or achieve an important goal, update your resume as soon as possible. That way, you won’t have to spend a ton of time on it when you’re ready to move on to a new job.

Your resume is typically a very important step in getting a new job. But, remember that there are a lot of other steps to successfully landing a job too, so don’t stop here. After you’ve updated your resume, take a look at any online profiles you can update, start brushing up on your interview skills, and find ways to network now so you’ll have the connections you need, when you need them. Preparing ahead of time will help take the fear and dread out of your next job search, and hopefully, help you find the perfect fit fast! For, as one of our great presidents Abraham Lincoln once said, “I will prepare and someday my chance will come.”

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Resume Selfie: What Your Resume Says About You

resume_selfie_webLove ‘em or hate ‘em, selfies don’t appear to be going away any time soon. Those sometimes cute and sometimes in bad taste self photos that say “look at me” are still a growing trend, so much so that The Oxford Dictionaries named “selfie” the Word of the Year in 2013. There are good things and bad things to say about selfies, but as a job seeker there is one aspect of the selfie you would be wise to emulate.

Just like those images attract attention, your resume should be doing the same. And just as those pictures can tell you a lot about the person being photographed, your resume tells potential employers a lot about you. With that in mind, it’s critical that what your resume says about you is positive, accurate, and intriguing. As Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter, a career and workplace adviser at Glassdoor, tells Forbes, “Resumes are the heartbeat of a career search. If done well, your resume will tell your story and sell you.”

Capture Your Good Side
There is a lot of good advice out there on what not to say in your resume and how you can make it better. However, you also really need to specifically consider what you want it to say – what kind of impression you want your resume to give. Every job and employer is different, but there are some basic characteristics that are desirable in every position or company, and you want to ensure your resume highlights those.

So check out these five things you want your resume to say about you and how to get the message across.

I’m Detailed
The best way to say you’re detail-oriented is by displaying it in your resume. Start by ensuring that there are no spelling mistakes within your resume and that your formatting is consistent throughout. Based on the position’s job description, include only the most effective information in your resume, and that means quantifying, not just describing, your accomplishments. As another Forbes article states, “We live in a metrics driven work culture and it’s no longer enough to state that you increased sales or productivity, you need to back it up with quantifiable data whenever possible.”

I Have Skills
Don’t confuse job responsibilities with skills. You want employers to have a full picture of what you can do and all the skills you bring to the table. Matt Tarpey, a career adviser with CareerBuilder, tells Forbes, “A list of hard skills and examples of how you put those skills to use in previous positions is a great way to stand out from the pack.”

I’m Driven
Learned a new skill on your own time, taken on a leadership position within a professional organization, or working toward an advanced degree in the evenings? Include it in your resume. As US News explains, “Employers seek people who will take upon themselves more than what is actually expected or required.”

I Work Well With Others
Employers don’t want drama between their employees, so highlight your interpersonal skills. Include any experience you’ve had in a leadership role, successfully working on a team, or acting as a mediator between clients and vendors. This can also include experience outside the workplace, such as industry associations or non-profit organizations. “Employers want to hire people who can play well with others in the ‘corporate sandbox,’” another US News article says.

I’m A Good Communicator
Your resume will tell an employer very quickly whether or not you can communicate well. Providing succinct information that makes sense and uses proper grammar is vital. And, since communicating is also about listening and understanding, show that you understand what the employer is looking for by tailoring your resume to the specific position.

While the written resume may seem old-school compared to the selfie, it’s still very much a part of the job search. “Even as technology has advanced and changed the way job seekers find open positions, the resume remains an integral part of the hiring process,” Tarpey reinforces. And, as the ultimate selfie, you want your resume to scream, “Look at me!” for all the right reasons.

What else do you want your resume to communicate to employers? How do you ensure that your resume represents an accurate, positive picture? Share your thoughts on your own resume selfie in the comments section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.