Tag Archives: salary

Telling Your Boss You Won’t Keep Working After Hours

Enough is enough.

You’re already working more than 40 hours a week, and you love your job. But one day your boss asks you to stay even later, maybe because they have to and they want you to match the workload. Or perhaps they just keep piling on more responsibilities, until you have to burn the midnight oil just to keep up.

That’s not fair, and your boss is taking advantage of you. You should be able to have a personal life. If you’re ready to put an end to this, check out a few of our tips below.

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5 College Majors Employers Love

degrees_employers_love_webThe decision to get a higher education is an important one. Often, a lot of money and time goes into earning a college degree, so it’s vital that you choose a career path that works best for you. If you’re thinking about getting a higher education, you may be wondering which college majors are currently in demand.

According to the National Recruiting Center of Express Employment Professionals, there are a handful of college majors that businesses are continually looking to hire. Are they in your career path? To find out, take a look at these five college majors employers love.

Finance
A bachelor’s degree in finance may lead to a career in banking, financial planning, money management, insurance, or tax preparation. Often, graduates with a degree in finance will qualify for a wide range of jobs in public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Examples of core courses in the financial degree path include accounting, economics, business law, and personal finance. According to Payscale.com, financial analysts make between $40,000-$70,000 a year, with monetary increases as you work up the ladder to management. In fact, according to Forbes, finance is one of the college degrees with the highest starting salaries.

Accounting
While finance is generally described as the study of how to manage money, accounting is the study of obtaining, collecting, and dealing with financial information. If you’re interested in becoming a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), a degree in accounting is the right choice. Careers for those with accounting degrees include bookkeepers, CPAs, auditors, tax specialists, and personal accountants, and courses in an accounting program typically include statistics, business law, cost accounting, and auditing. Payscale reports that the salary for accountants ranges from $35,000-$66,000, and CPAs range from $42-$106,000 annually.

Business Administration
The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) is a study that focuses on all aspects of business. Business administration programs are designed to teach a wide range of topics, including marketing, management, finance, human resources, and economics. The Master of Business Administration (MBA) requires additional schooling and is a professional degree. Business graduates may seek careers in human resources, marketing, or management, and many even land roles in high-level leadership. According to Payscale, office management jobs pay around $40,000 a year, while career paths requiring an MBA may pay anywhere from $53-$156,000.

Mechanical Engineering
If you’ve always been a builder, inventor, or designer, you may be interested in a mechanical engineering degree. Mechanical engineering graduates are sought by employers in many industries, including aerospace, automotive, chemical, construction, electronics, utilities, and energy. Typical courses in a mechanical engineering program may include calculus, chemistry, physics, and programming. The average salary for mechanical engineers, according to Payscale, ranges from $50,000-$93,000 a year.

Computer Science
A diverse field with many opportunities, computer science careers are in high demand. In fact, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, job openings for this career path are expected to grow by more than 20% through 2022. Courses include computer programming, web programing, information technology, programming languages, digital design, and more. There are many career paths for computer science graduates, including software developers, computer programmers, network administrators, web developers, database administrators, and software testers. Payscale reports that computer science degrees bring an average annual salary of $53,000-$150,000.

Vocational/Technical Education
College isn’t the only path to higher education. For many, there’s a better option: Career Technical Education (CTE). For those who don’t think college is the best option or want to enter the workforce sooner, a CTE can provide the skills and training they need for other in-demand jobs. According to Express, those sought-after jobs include medical assistants, welders, machinists, dental assistants, hygienists, CNC operators, and licensed nurses.

Non College Grads
If higher education isn’t for you, you’re not out of the race. A recent survey from Express revealed the hottest fields that are hiring the most non-college grads include office services, industrial, health care, marketing, and more. Take a look at the full list to help you build your career path.

Do you have a college degree? What does your educational path look like? Share your story with us in the comments section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Scary Interview Questions in Time for Halloween

Are you spooked by interview questions that are difficult to answer? Interviews can be scary, but they don’t have to be. Take a look at these common interview questions and click each link to discover tips for answering them with ease.

Why are you looking for a change?

What are your greatest weaknesses?

What is your desired salary?

Why should I hire you?

Have you ever failed?

Why is there a gap in your work history?

How do you answer scary interview questions? Let us know in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

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How to Counter a Job Offer

how_to_counter_a_job_offer_webIf you’re searching for a job, it may be tempting to take any offer a company gives you when it comes to pay, but always be prepared to counter their offer.

In fact, experts suggest that an employer’s first offer has some wiggle room, and if you’re savvy enough, a counter offer could score an even bigger salary or more job flexibility.

So how do you prepare a counter offer without blowing your opportunity? We’ve got five easy steps:

  1. When a hiring manager calls with a job offer, tell her or him that you need time to consider the offer. Be sure to let him know that you are excited about the position, but just need to study the salary and benefits.
  2. Study the offer. Really educate yourself on the benefits, vacation packages, and salary. By knowing the full offer, you are better positioned to negotiate. For instance, if the salary is lower than you wanted, maybe you can negotiate for better insurance or extra days of vacation.
  3. When offered the job, study up on the typical salary for that position and for the region where you live. For instance, if you know the starting salary for a particular job is $40,000, then use that as your starting point. If you have multiple years of experience, you could negotiate a higher range based on your knowledge.
  4. Make the counter offer. Many job seekers may find negotiations to be intimidating, but speaking confidently about your counter offer is important. The position has already been offered to you, so the company wants to hire you. You do have a right to go for the benefits or salary you believe you deserve.
  5. Re-negotiate. If the employer feels the salary or perks you counter with are too much, be prepared to negotiate for an amount you’re both happy with. Don’t go into a counter offer with an “all or nothing” approach. Find middle ground that makes you and your future employer comfortable.

While it is always worth a try to improve a job offer, be realistic. Know your market worth, but don’t push the envelope too much. You may not have much wiggle room if the employer is set on the salary offered.

Above all else, make sure you are in a position to walk away when making a counter offer. If you are in a desperate situation, be aware that a counter offer may not be accepted.

Have you ever made a counter to a job offer and had it accepted? Share your story with us in the comments below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

How Important Is Your Education?

how_important_is_your_education_web

In today’s world, education is often the best tool for getting ahead. It can help you grow in a variety of ways—you can pursue a passion, increase your long-term income, and have the experience of a lifetime. In fact, college graduates earn more than twice as much as high school graduates. Some studies have found that college graduates with a bachelor’s degree earn 80% more per year than those with only a high school degree. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the more education you have, the more your average salary increases.

Although college can be expensive, and the overall student debt has increased to roughly $1 trillion, the pay gap between those with a college degree and those without is increasing yearly. According to the Economic Policy Institute, Americans with four-year college degrees made 98% more an hour on average in 2013 than people without a degree—that’s a number that has consistently increased since the early 1980s when it was at 64%.

Educational & Social Benefits
Making more money in your lifetime isn’t the only benefit to a college degree. There are other educational and social benefits that can be drawn from a college education.  These include:

  • Quality of Life – Individuals who attend college make informed decisions, which can also lead to having more money. Studies have shown that college grads save and make more money and have more assets, including homes, cars, and investments. People who attend college tend to work in white collar jobs, in office buildings, or other facilities with air-conditioning, heating, and conveniences that improve the quality of life. Additionally, the Council on Contemporary Families reported that college graduates are less likely to divorce.
  • Work Productivity & Opportunity – If job satisfaction is important to you, then consider pursuing a college degree. Studies have shown that people who attend college have greater work opportunities, are more satisfied at work, and tend to have skills that can be easily applied in different work settings and different geographic locations. Additionally, those who attend some college are employed at three times a higher rate than those who have not.
  • Longer & Healthier Lifespan – In addition to the income boost that comes with higher education, college grads are healthier and have longer lifespans as well. A survey by the Center for Disease Control indicates that between 1990 and 2008, the life expectancy gap between the most and least educated Americans grew from 13 to 14 years among males and from 8 to 10 years among females. Unfortunately, studies have also shown that those with less education are more likely to have risk factors that predict disease—such as smoking and obesity. Having a higher socioeconomic status (measured by total family income, level of education attained and professional career status) is directly correlated with better physical health and life expectancy.
  • Self-Esteem & Psychological Well-being – When you walk across that stage with a diploma in hand, there is a sense of pride and confidence that no one can take away from you. Not only is it a rite of passage, but you’ve accomplished something that can never be taken away. Additionally, studies conducted by the College Board have found that those who have completed some college are not only more well-equipped to handle mental challenges, but also report a higher level of satisfaction when doing so.
  • Building a Legacy – One of the best parts of a college education is passing the benefits on to your kids. Children of college-educated parents are smarter, more likely to graduate from high school, more likely to attend college, and have a better quality of life.

Diverse Opportunities
Whether it’s a bachelor’s degree from a traditional four-year college or a Career Technical School, higher education has benefits far outside of knowledge and books. Whether or not education plays the most important role in your likelihood of getting hired, there’s no doubt that taking opportunities to learn and grow in your career is a beneficial piece of the puzzle. And, you don’t necessarily have to follow a typical four-year degree path. In fact, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 14 of the 20 fastest-growing occupations in America require an associate’s degree or less. If you’re hoping to further your education without following a four-year plan, check out this article for more information.

 

What other benefits have you seen from attending college? Let us know in the comments section below.

When it’s Okay to Ask About Pay

ask_about_pay_webIf the world were perfect, hunger would be eradicated, chocolate wouldn’t have calories, and you could go in to every job knowing exactly how much you’re going to get offered. Unfortunately, the world is not perfect. So, how do you find out a job’s salary when you’re in an interview?

Depending on the company, the salary range might be posted in the ad. However, these numbers are usually “commensurate to experience,” meaning companies want to evaluate candidates’ work history before offering a hard number. This is not uncommon. Don’t go into an interview expecting the exact number that is listed, because nine times out of 10 you won’t be offered that.

If the job description doesn’t include a salary range, you’ll want to research what a typical salary for that position might be before the interview. This will give you an idea of how much the employer might be willing to offer.  There are several websites available out there that can help you accomplish this.  What range you fall into is determined by your education and experience, the size of the company, as well as where you live. Pay for a job can vary widely depending on location. Companies want to make sure they are getting the most qualified individual and are willing to pay for that experience.

At some point in the hiring process, you might be asked about your salary expectations. If this happens in the early stages of the interview process, try to deflect. Show the people you are interviewing with that money isn’t your first priority—because when it comes down to it, you are working with people on projects. Focus on finding out more about the job itself, because there will be plenty of time to discuss dollars and cents down the road.

In general, it’s best to let the employer bring up salary. In many circles, it’s considered gauche to ask about salary upfront. Sure, you could work it in to the conversation, but you may risk putting them off in the process. According to experts, it’s best to wait for the potential employer to bring up the topic of salary—and it will be brought up. We all work to make money, so whenever the salary discussion comes up, figure out what salary you want, and then ask for a little more to allow room for compromise.

This is where your salary research will pay off—by having a competitive wage ready, you’ll not only feel prepared and confident, but they will appreciate that you did your research. If you aren’t comfortable with naming a number, use key words and phrases like the following:

  • “I’m very excited to work with you, and trust you will offer a fair and competitive salary.”
  • “I would like a salary comparable to my experience and value.”
  • “Money is important, but there are other topics that are relevant that we should discuss. Could we revisit this question later, after we discuss the company and the position more?”
  • “Until I know more about the position and benefits, it’s difficult to give you a hard number.”

If you can, avoid naming an exact figure.  You might be short-changing yourself.

Remember, it isn’t just the salary that counts. There are other perks and benefits to working with an organization that should be considered—such as 401(k), insurance, vacation, and health benefits. Remember to get the big picture from whomever you’re interviewing with—it isn’t always about the salary.

Do you have any tips for asking about pay? If so, leave your tips in the comments below!

 

Green Is In: How To Ask for a Raise

ask_for_raise_webThe top fashion color for 2014 may still be Radiant Orchid according to Pantone, but green accessories are also in style this fall, especially the kind that fill up your wallet or purse. And with the start of the fourth quarter and end of the year drawing near, now could be a good time to consider asking for a raise. This can undoubtedly be an intimidating task, so here are three steps to prepare you for taking the next step.

1. Consider the timing.
Timing is everything, particularly when it comes to asking for a salary increase. So, think about if right now is the optimum time to discuss the subject of a raise with your boss. Take into consideration the economy, how well the company is doing, if there have been signs of budget cuts or increases lately, and when compensation adjustments are usually done. On the other hand, if your employer does performance reviews at the end of the year, right now could be the perfect time to bring up the possibility of a raise. Often, employers have already budgeted for pay increases prior to employee reviews.

2. Do your homework.
If the timing seems right, then you need to do your homework so you’re prepared to logically and persuasively make your request. If you’re asking for a pay increase, there needs to be a good reason for it. Simply showing up every day and doing what’s expected of you isn’t enough. You must be able to prove that you’ve exceeded expectations, reached and gone past your performance goals, or provided tremendous value to the company. Keeping a running list of your accomplishments and praises from others will help ensure you don’t forget anything important. Your list should also include legitimate numbers that place a quantitative value on your work.

3. Second-guess yourself.
Once you think the time is right and you’ve gathered all the pertinent information, stop and second-guess yourself. Consider if your work performance and accomplishments truly merit a pay increase. Can you numerically show how your work has positively impacted your employer’s profits? If the answer is yes, then think about your attitude. Are you entering this process with a humble, thankful spirit or with an attitude of arrogance and entitlement? Even if you truly have earned a salary increase, your attitude and how you handle conversation with your boss could be the deciding factor in you seeing a higher number on your next paystub.

Everyone wants a raise, but most people don’t want to have the uncomfortable conversation about it with their managers. After all, it can be scary and intimidating to ask your boss for more money. If you properly prepare for it, though, asking for a raise can be a positive experience.

Do you have other tips for successfully asking for a salary increase? How have you secured raises in the past? Share your experiences of asking for pay raises in the comments section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.