Being Right Doesn’t Always Get You Ahead in Your Career

Being RightWhen starting a new job, we all want to impress our co-workers and supervisors. That desire and initiative can be a good thing, but if you’re not careful, your need to impress could be seen as selfish energy. One way new employees try to impress their co-workers is by proving that they are right on a project.

New workers can get that incessant inner voice that screams, “People must agree with me! I must convert them to my point of view.” It could go as far as giving advice on a project, and then you secretly hope the project fails so you can flaunt the warning emails to managers. At this point, it’s no longer about the work – it’s about being right.

“There are three musts that hold us back: I must do well. You must treat me well. And the world must be easy.” ― Albert Ellis

Give up the need to be right. The need to be proven right is usually not in the best interest of company goals. It’s good to share your knowledge and advice when there’s an opportunity, but it’s important to listen, too. Sometimes that means coming to a compromise. Learning to work with your co-workers and not against them will help you get ahead faster than by just “being right.”

How do you provide value to your co-workers and managers instead of always being right? Let us know in the comment section below.

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