Monthly Archives: October 2016

Great Leaders Who Overcame Huge Obstacles

overcomingYou may have heard the saying, “If you get knocked down; get back up and try again.” Not everyone on top today got there by having success after success. Many people face obstacles that forced them to work harder and show more determination than others. In fact, the greatest triumphs often come from situations that seem overwhelmingly awful. The way in which you respond to those adversities can be seen as victories themselves. People who have encountered challenges may agree that the factors in overcoming obstacles are determination, focus, and self-discipline.

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4 Tips for Setting a Personal Budget

Save Money at WorkFor many, the word “budget” is a negative term often compared to a diet in the way that you have to give up things you love. A personal budget is a plan to help you build a solid foundation of financial wellness so you can do and have the things you want without hurting your financial future. At the core of budgeting, there is one common principle—track all of your expenses to see where your money is going.

After tracking your expenses, you may realize that you are spending more than you’re making. Draw a line between your wants and needs. Remember living within your means can keep you from drowning in debt.

Keep it simple

1.  Outline your financial goals.

Are you saving to purchase a car or house, pay off debt, or save for a vacation? Be specific on how much you need to save and how long it will take to achieve your overall goal. This should help you plan how much to save monthly. Make sure your goals are achievable.

2.  Track Your Income and Spending

The main idea of a budget is help you spend less than you’re bringing in. To get started, list your income and monthly expenses. Keep track of all your expenses, everything from your morning cup of coffee to property taxes to see where the money is going. Remember, expenses like your mortgage or car payment likely won’t change over time, however expenses like your electric bill can vary depending on the time of year.

3.  Identify Ways to Save

Develop a wants-and-needs list to help identify where to start trimming your spending. Most financial experts recommend earmarking 40% of your earnings for necessities such as housing and utilities and 10% in an interest-bearing account or a tax-favored 401(K) plan. Look for creative ways to save, for example make coffee at home instead of spending $4 a day; $20 a week, or $80 a month. Remember small savings can add up to a huge surplus.

4.  Stick To It

  • Review your budget on a regular basis.
  • Stay focused on your goals.
  • Be sure that the budget accurately reflects your spending and be prepared to make additional adjustments.

A surplus in your monthly budget is right around the corner and puts you one step closer to achieving your overall goal.

Do you have tips for setting and sticking to a personal budget? Let us know in the comment section!

Quick Tips for Getting Through the First 90 Days at Work

facts_about_company_webYou rocked your interview and landed the job! Now what? The first 90 days of work are important for any new employee. It’s during this time that you are able to shape important first impressions, build relationships, and establish a rhythm for your new role.

Here are some quick tips to help you navigate those first 90 days successfully:

  1.  Get to work on time.
  2.  Do your homework. Take the time to learn all you can about the company, its product and services. Skim through the bios of the company’s executive staff.
  3.  Set up one-on-one meetings with key people who you will interact with. Remember names. Find out which departments you will need to work with.
  4.  Say yes. Be willing to take on opportunities that present themselves, as long as you feel comfortable doing so. This is a great way to show initiative and get involved.
  5.  Build relationships. Ask your co-workers to grab a cup of coffee with you, and get to know them better. Doing this helps builds connections. Be sure to ask questions about their job duties to gain a better perspective on how the department works. This will help you know how to approach them about future projects or tasks.
  6.  Deliver on deadlines. If you promise to complete a task by a specific time and date, then be sure to keep your promise. No one likes a bunch of excuses.
  7.  Work hard. Stay focused on the task at hand and avoid distractions.
  8.  Learn the office politics but resist involvement. Stay away from the internal politics and turf battles. Learn the inner workings of the organization without having to choose sides. Getting involved is a no-win situation.
  9.  Understand your role. Get a clear understanding of your job responsibilities from your leader. Taking advice from co-workers can be helpful, but confirm your specific job duties with leader .
  10.  Have confidence. The skills that you have acquired in your professional life landed you the job; now learn your strengths and weaknesses as it relates to your new job.

If you recently started a new job, let us know in the comments section below how you got through your first 90 days.

The Results Are In: What’s Holding Your Career Back?

The Results Are In: What’s Holding Your Career Back?

overcome_tough_job_search_web

While many people experience setbacks on their career path, every obstacle is different, and we wanted to know what you think is holding your career back.

The Results Are In
The number one thing holding careers back, according to our survey, is the “lack of job availability” with 19% of the vote. The other top answers received almost the same amount of votes, and include:

  • “No room for advancement”—16%
  • “Lack of experience”—15%
  • “No college degree”—13%

Additionally, “fear of change” received 10% of the vote, followed by “family commitments” with 9%, and “I don’t feel held back by anything” with 4%.

Is Your Age a Factor?
Readers were also given the option to select “Other” and provide their own answers. Responses include:

  • “The economy”
  • “Companies don’t want to train anymore”
  • “Lack of confidence”
  • “Length of time I’ve been unemployed”
  • “Software applications”
  • “Resume looks like I’m a job hopper”
  • “Health issues”

Of those who selected the “Other” option, 50% reported that their age is holding their career back.

What else is holding your career back? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.