Why You Shouldn’t Give Up On Your Job Search

You may want to quit your job search, but what happens when you actually do?

The job search isn’t easy. It’s the internet equivalent of cold calling: knocking on doors and hoping someone is interested in your product. Except the product is you. Every time you fail to get an interview or don’t make it to the next round, it can feel like a personal insult.

All of that makes it tempting to quit—to stop searching for a while and dig into your savings, maybe get started on a few hobbies. If you can afford it, that’s fine! However, if the job search turns into months that turn into years, you might have a problem.

Here are some other things to consider before giving up the job search.

You Need Money and Purpose

This is the most obvious reason, but we felt it warranted mentioning anyway. If you stop looking for a job, you can’t find employment or collect unemployment.

You may plan on using the time to pursue other interests or hobbies. However, if you do decide to do this, plan things out far in advance. How long can you afford to live off of savings? Is this pursuit worth having a gap on your resume? Will you be able to explain that gap in future interviews?

Mooching off of family members or friends isn’t a good plan, especially if you’re not looking for a job. Any time spent out of the job search is time not spent furthering your career. It might seem fun at first, but once the money runs out, what will you have to show for it?

Your Skills and Personality Are Valuable

According to a September USA today article, “[since] employers [are] struggling to find workers in an ever-tightening labor market, many are hiring job candidates for both white- and blue-collar jobs who lack skills or experience deemed essential just a few years ago.”

What does that mean for you as a job seeker? It turns out that all those jobs you avoided applying for because of their lofty qualifications might actually be a good fit for you. As noted by the author, Paul Davidson, “candidates with some rough edges are becoming more attractive because employers have little choice. The low, 4.4% unemployment rate means there are few uncommitted workers. There was a record 6.2 million job openings in July, the Labor Department said [the week of 9/11/17]. And nearly half of about 2,000 companies said they couldn’t find qualified candidates for their job openings this year, up from 41% in 2016, according to a CareerBuilder survey.”

If you stop looking for work due to frustration with the process, you won’t end up applying for these jobs. The economy is close to full employment, with unemployment just under 5%. There’s always some amount of unemployment due to people switching jobs, and right now that makes up the majority of the statistic.

This means there are more open jobs than candidates to fill those positions. As noted in the USA Today article, employers are willing to take on employees they can train and bring to the level needed to do the job. You don’t have to be perfect, but you do have to apply.

Change Your Perspective

If the traditional job search isn’t working out, consider job searching differently instead of giving up entirely. If you’re tired of spending hours filling out online applications, try spending more time networking. Join civic groups (volunteer groups) or professional organizations.

But don’t start out by asking every person you meet for a job. Get to know them, and build a relationship organically. Become friends. After that, you can mention that you’re looking for a job.

Try to think about the job search differently. Keep things interesting. Remember how employers are now accepting applicants with “rough edges?” Realize that being hired for jobs like that might mean taking a pay cut. You may also want to consider a change of industry or types of jobs you haven’t worked before. Look at your skills and figure out which ones are transferable.

How do you keep up with the job search?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

 

 

 

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20 Responses to “Why You Shouldn’t Give Up On Your Job Search”

  1. Steve #

    What would you suggest for someone that is 61 and trained for a field that has no opportunity left?

    October 4, 2017 at 6:26 am Reply
    • Lorna #

      It’s difficult.
      I’ve been trying to re-enter the work force about ten years (in my late fifties now)
      Returned to college and graduated top of the class, but still no luck.
      I’ve been doing all the “ right things” but haven’t been the number one choice yet.
      Older people have bills to pay too.
      Don’t have any advice, but you are not alone.

      October 4, 2017 at 8:38 am Reply
      • Zo #

        Try strategies that don’t allow you to date yourself just to get the interview. I’m 45 and can relate to what you are saying. leave off dates when you graduated, when you began a job and left. only out dates on experience within the last 10 years. Use a resume model that reflects experience specific to that job.

        October 4, 2017 at 10:11 am Reply
    • Movin' On Up Staff #

      That’s a tough situation for sure. We previously wrote a blog that addresses age issues in the workplace. Many of the commentators had useful stories to share as well.

      Sometimes you have to look at the situation differently—what skills and abilities have you learned in your field that can be applied to other fields? If your field truly has no opportunity left, you’ll need to bring those awesome skills elsewhere.

      October 4, 2017 at 3:07 pm Reply
    • Beth Henson #

      Check with AARP through CareerSource. They have a program that puts you to work part-time with non-profits and government agencies. They will train you.

      October 5, 2017 at 5:26 pm Reply
      • Colleen Albertson #

        I already checked with AARP they do not have anything near me at this time

        October 6, 2017 at 3:25 pm Reply
  2. Bradley Biggs #

    Thanks for the lift.

    October 4, 2017 at 7:48 am Reply
    • Movin' On Up Staff #

      No problem! Thanks for reading our blog!

      October 4, 2017 at 2:57 pm Reply
  3. Mike Davidian #

    There’s always hope. Agencies, Job Fairs, and do let people know that you are in the market for a job should you hear of. Visit your school on occasion. Volunteer.

    October 4, 2017 at 8:04 am Reply
    • Lorna #

      Agencies won’t always help. If you don’t have recent references they won’t send you out on jobs.
      Sometimes your references move away to other countries or die. So far volunteering hasn’t helped either.
      Volunteering is frequently like looking for a job, and often not chosen for a volunteer position (where the organization wants a person to work for free it seems).
      While perhaps there is always hope, sometimes you lose hope and “temporarily” give up. The constant rejection is hard to take. You know you have useful transferable skills, but always being second or third is discouraging.

      October 4, 2017 at 8:35 am Reply
    • Movin' On Up Staff #

      That’s right Mike! Sometimes an expanded job search can be just the way to go.

      October 4, 2017 at 2:58 pm Reply
  4. Bruce Grabenkort #

    I appreciate what this article says. What goes unsaid is the lack of response from applications. I understand the word “No” but I don’t understand the lack of communication. If I don’t qualify, say so. Don’t leave me hanging, hoping for a potential interview.
    The article brings up good points like networking and job fairs, etc. I continue to look using all of techniques hoping to land soon.

    October 4, 2017 at 9:15 am Reply
    • Movin' On Up Staff #

      Hmm, that’s a good point. Why do companies sometimes fail to communicate after an interview? We might use this for a future blog. Stay tuned, and thanks for the comment!

      October 4, 2017 at 3:02 pm Reply
    • jabrox #

      Hey Bruce!

      Just wanted to let you know that we posted a blog about why companies don’t follow up after an interview. Thanks for inspiring us!

      October 13, 2017 at 8:51 am Reply
  5. The problem I have applying for a new job is sticker shock…. I am multi skilled…. I am a machine repairman and an HVAC tech… Currently….I repair machine centers to rooftop units….I have seven years of college and 20 + years of experience….. Employers want to pay 1990 wages….. Then they say they can’t find skilled workers…. You want skilled labor….. open the checkbook…. 30.00 +

    October 4, 2017 at 12:06 pm Reply
  6. Colleen Albertson #

    I have been looking pretty much non stop for work since I was laid off in 2008 but no one is willing to hire me. I had 2 set backs because of accidents 1 in 2010 and another in 2013 but each time I went right back looking again once I was able to. I do not know why I can’t get a job not even a beginners job I have about 20 yrs of Accounting experience with AP & AR Bookkeeping I am in my late 50’s. I lots get interviews but no one is hiring me I am also registered with lots of agencies besides Express I do net work as well but no luck even then, when I am referred to a company by someone I still can’t get the job. I get we like you and what you have to offer but we decide to go with someone else but will keep your resume in case this person does not work out or we need more help.

    October 4, 2017 at 12:28 pm Reply
  7. Steve #

    I REALLY appreciate everyone’s response and willingness to help out! I’ve been everywhere that has been mentioned to one degree or another. I will keep on trying and see what happens I guess! Good luck to all of you!

    October 4, 2017 at 6:16 pm Reply
  8. Elizabeth Mackee #

    I was laid off from my job in August 2015 despite rave reviews from my employer. I have worked temporary jobs (currently working in one now), but am fed up with the chronic uncertainty and will get a CDL license to drive a truck next year if I don’t get an office job.

    October 4, 2017 at 6:27 pm Reply
  9. EARL WALLACE #

    RIGHT NOW I AM WORKING CONTRACT@ CONOCO FULLTIME AND PART TIME @ HEB.I FEEL LIKE I CAN DO AND BE BETTER,BUT I JUST TURNED 60 AND THERE IS WAY TOO MUCH AGE AND RACE DISCRIMINATION.ARE THE HIRING MANAGERS ,H.R. PEOPLE DOING THEIR JOB CORRECTLY?IS THIS WHAT IS COMING OUT OF STATE COLLEGES?IF IT IS,WE ARE IN VERY{HOW MANY TIMES SHOULD I SAY VERY} SERIOUS TROUBLE.A PLAGUE OF HOMELESSNESS IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER.YOU FEEL DEFEATED AND KILLS YOUR AMBITION,PASSION,ETC.I HOPE THESE PEOPLE CAN SLEEP WELL @ NIGHT KNOWING THAT FOLKS ARE SUFFERING BECAUSE OF AGE AND RACE DISCRIMINATION.WHAT GOT ME GOING WAS WHEN I OVERHEARD A LADY TALK ABOUT THIS @ A NETWORKING GROUP{BJM IN SPRING,TX.}IS IT JUST ME FOLKS?BY THE WAY,WAS THERE A TIME WHEN THERE WERE ANNUAL RAISES?!

    October 5, 2017 at 1:15 pm Reply
  10. Yes you’re right.Im meeting folks older than me in their 50s on up and they’re homeless.Tjey all had skills and this country has just thrown them away.Theres something terribly wrong here.The homelessness is increasing.I am 40 years old and lack skills,however my only skills are drawing and I have acting experience which the latter is not dependable.Im unemployed and can’t find anything.I think it’s age along with lack of skills.I feel your pay here

    October 13, 2017 at 10:22 am Reply

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