Safety Month: Forklift Safety

We’re back to wrap up National Safety Month with one last set of tips.

Getting your forklift certification is something worth celebrating. Forklifts are great tools that allow you to do things you could never accomplish alone. However, improper use of these warehouse workhorses could result in injury or even death.

Every three days, someone in the United States is killed in a forklift-related accident. You can avoid this terrible outcome by practicing proper forklift safety procedures. Need a reminder? Check out this handy infographic below.

[Download a PDF of this poster here.]

Poll Results: Does Charitable Giving Matter?

What’s the best way for companies to show they care?

When a company gives back, it shows they care about more than their bottom line. It helps to humanize a faceless corporate entity. Companies that give back frequently see less turnover and greater success.

Last month we asked readers what type of giving they prefer their companies to engage in.

The Results

Paid time off for volunteer/charitable activities led the responses with over 24% of the vote, followed by corporate partnerships with local nonprofits at 17%, and matching employee donation funds at 13% in second and third, respectively.

Other results included:

  • Opportunities to provide company services/products pro bono: 13%
  • Company sponsored volunteer events: 11%
  • Allow employees to pick organizations/causes the company supports: 10%
  • Donation drives (food, blood, clothing, etc.): 9%
  • Other: 2%

What does this mean?

Employees want to take the lead when it comes to charitable giving. They want to help steer the company toward causes they personally support. Whether that means receiving paid time off for their efforts, seeing the company partner with local nonprofits, or having the opportunity for the company to match their donation funds, they just want to be included in the process.

Employees like the communities they serve and want to see a real, lasting impact from charitable giving. When companies and employees are united in their desire to serve, everyone wins.

What is your company doing to give back this year? Let us know in the comments section below!

 

Ask a Recruiter: Losing the Job Before You Even Get to the Formal Interview

Is it possible to ruin your chances of getting hired before you even meet your interviewer? Yes it is.

We frequently get questions from readers about the interview process. One of the most common is why they never make it past the first interview.

Although we covered interview tips in a recent blog, here’s one more key fact—the formal interview process often starts before you even step foot in the building. We’re talking about the phone interview and any other interactions you have with your recruiter or HR professional leading up to the interview. Many times, this is when mistakes happen.

Here at Movin’ On Up, we don’t fault jobseekers for tripping up. If you’ve never had a phone interview before, how are you supposed to know how that world works? Everyone has to start learning somewhere.

To help prevent you from committing these pre-interview mistakes, we asked our recruiters for their thoughts. Here’s what they had to say.

  1. Constant Calling

If you’re the best person for the job, recruiters and HR professionals want to see you succeed. After all, your success is their success! Although calling every once in a while is fine, this means that calling every day to check in is not only unrequired, but also rather bothersome. In extreme cases, applicants have even been known to treat their upcoming interview like a side dish to a main course. Literally.

“I once had an applicant call to follow up on their application while going through the drive through. Then they put us on hold to order a number one with a soda.”Tracy S., MI.

But the real reason to stay away from overcalling your recruiter or HR contact? It makes it look like you’re unable to do work on your own, and need constant contact. Employers frequently look for applicants that are clearly able to handle deadlines and projects on their own.

  1. Too Much Negativity

The job search is hard. Constant rejection can sting. However, you should never bring up these experiences in your interactions with recruiters or HR professionals. They want to see you at your best, not your worst.

“I’ve had some applicants start our first phone call off by speaking poorly of their previous managers. While I understand bad managers exist, when an applicant starts off an interview that way it makes me think about how they’ll talk about their future manager if we hire them. I’ve also had applicants speak at length on businesses they have applied to and been rejected from. Basically, try to keep negativity out of any interaction with your recruiter or HR professional.”Carlos D., OR.

“It’s hard to make an offer to an applicant who reveals too many personal issues during a phone interview. Although I get that a bad divorce or single parent situation can be tough, I want to use the phone interview to see what you might look like as part of a business. Spending so much time on negative personal experiences takes away from that.”—Roxanne P., TX.

Keep the conversation to your accomplishments and accolades. Although everyone has bad experiences, a phone interview is not a great place to share them.

  1. Lack of Professionalism

Regardless of how friendly your recruiter or HR contact is, you still need to remain professional. Whether they’re nervous or tired of the whole job search process, some applicants say or do things they shouldn’t. This can be over the phone during an initial interview, or by email.
But what exactly does “professional” mean when it comes to the job search? Not doing these things.

“Sometimes I’ll call an applicant and have a great phone interview, but then they disappear. I’ve had some cancel interviews multiple times with issues such as car trouble, personal problems, and last minute emergencies out of town. Once I received all three excuses from one person! Although I get that life happens, we can only reschedule so many times.” —Tracy S., MI.

“What gets to me is when applicants don’t do their research. I’ve had people come in saying they think we’re just a temp service and don’t do anything else before I can even tell them about how I can help them with a temp-to-hire or other eventual fulltime position. They come in hurt and frustrated before I even say anything. Since we’re in a smaller market and have established clients, I might be the only one with access to that job posting. And they’re perfect for it!”—Shannon J., WA.

The job search can be frustrating. However, put that frustration away when you’re having a phone interview or emailing your recruiter or HR professional. Be the best version of yourself, and always believe that this one could really be the one. If you don’t believe in yourself, they won’t either.

Click here for more in our Ask a Recruiter series.

Have questions for our recruiters? Let us know in the comments below!

Safety Month: Ladder Safety

We’re back with another set of safety tips for National Safety Month.

Does your job involve time spent climbing ladders? Maybe you need to restock product on the top shelf or repair a leaky roof. Whatever your reason, ladders are a necessary tool to get the job done. However, they can also be deadly.

Every year, 500,000 people are treated for ladder-related injuries, and 300 of those incidents end up being fatal. To make sure your name doesn’t end up on that annual list, check out these important safety tips.

[Download a PDF of this poster here]

 

Poll Question: What Type of Part-time Work Would You Consider?

We are all more than workers. We’re fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, grandparents, hobbyists, and so much more. Which means we need time to take care of sick kids, help our parents in their old age, or simply to pursue other passions.

But with a fulltime job, that’s not always easy. We need to get things done on a deadline; and sometimes, that means sacrificing time with our family and friends or a possible vacation opportunity.

For some, the standard five day, 8-to-5 work week just isn’t working anymore. Something more flexible is preferred, and part-time work could be the solution.

But not every type of part-time work is going to be right for all of us. What kind of part-time work would you consider?

Introducing the ExpressJobs App

Looking to quit your current job but not sure where to start? In search of the perfect part-time job? Or maybe you want to break into a new industry altogether.

To help make your search easier, Express Employment Professionals has introduced the ExpressJobs app, brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Want to hear more? Check out this quick video, and download the app on the App Store or Google Play today!

Job Spotlight: Welder

Will you connect to your career dreams through a welding position?

Despite already having experience with several jobs, many working adults are unable to answer the age-old question: “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

Our Job Spotlight monthly blog series is designed to help with that. In this series, we review all the basics of specific job types, from salary and duties to why people do the jobs they do.

Welder

For this month’s Job Spotlight, we’re heating things up with a look at welding positions. Welders use high-temperature equipment to combine separate metal pieces into a completely new product. Different types of welders use different kinds of equipment.  With the different types of welding come different work environments and industries.

Meet Brian, a welder, in this Job Genius video.

Required Education

Associate’s degree or certification program

Salary

Although it varies depending on a variety of factors (e.g. experience, industry, geographic area, etc.), welders can average nearly $40,000 a year, $100,000 for specialized welders.

What Welders Do

Welders handle a variety of responsibilities, which may include:

  • Preparing and maintaining welding equipment
  • Operating various welding machines to complete projects
  • Employing the use of diagrams and sketches to decide upon material quantities and project completion time

What Companies Look for in Welders

Every position is different, but many require the following skills:

  • Willingness to gain training and skills
  • Comprehension and application of industry safety regulations.
  • Ability to be extremely accurate and precise.
  • Teamwork and communication abilities

Are you a welder? What else should people know about your position? Let us know in the comments below!