Tag Archives: at work

Staying Fit with a Desk Job

If you have a desk job, odds are you sit. A lot. You write documents, organize files, and take phone calls—all deskbound.

And a sedentary lifestyle often leads to weight gain. CareerBuilder found that 56% of workers believe they are overweight, and 45% believe they’ve gained weight at their present job. The interesting part? The same study found that over a quarter of these employees were provided wellness benefits by their employers, but 63% didn’t take advantage of them!

If you’re cubicle-confined yourself, you probably know one of the major reasons for this: exercising is hard to fit into a desk job schedule. However, there are a few things you can do during the workday to keep yourself slim and fit.

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Time Management: When and How to Work to Your Max Productivity

Time is the one resource in your life that is neither replenishable nor renewable. Regardless of how you spin it, everyone starts each day on an equal playing field with 24 hours in the time bank. And while people often yearn for more time, what they really need is better time management. Understanding where your time goes, when you are most productive, and why you should protect yourself against distractions are the keys to achieving your max productivity.

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Is Your Company Building Customer Loyalty?

One of the most powerful tools for building a successful business is a loyal customer base that freely advocates for the services or products companies provide. Even the smallest businesses can become a giant when the word gets out that they’ll go the extra mile to build positive relationships with their customers.

But that kind of loyalty isn’t created overnight. In fact, according to research from Yotpo, “37% of consumers say it takes five or more purchases before they consider themselves loyal to a brand.” So, businesses must be willing to put in the work to create a brand that inspires a devoted fanbase.

Check which of the following five methods your company is employing to build customer loyalty and let us know how they did in the comments section below! (more…)

3 Types of Business Culture

Which one is right for you?

Job seekers frequently worry what their interviewer is thinking of them. They want to be perfect job candidates, ideal matches for the job description. They want to be liked, both as a person and as a prospective employee.

But job seekers must also consider whether the company they’re applying to is right for them. Even if you’re a perfect fit for the company, if the company isn’t a good fit for you, you probably won’t end up happy.

This is where culture comes in. Before you start interviewing, decide what your preferred company culture looks like. Do you want your co-workers to be a second family? Or is your job a place to get work done and get out? Let’s figure that out.

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Are You a Workaholic?

Because most people are.

It happens all the time. When you’re playing with the kids. When you’re at the doctor. When all you want to do is fall asleep.

You can’t stop thinking about work.

Regardless of whether you hate your job, we’re a nation of workaholics. A recent survey from OnePoll, revealed the average employee works four hours a week without pay, and spends another four hours each week just thinking about their job. Forty-eight percent (48%) thought of themselves as modern-day workaholics, while 53% were stressed out as they took the survey!

In the study, researchers found three main symptoms of workaholism. Let’s dig in.

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Have You Considered Phased Retirement?

You’re tired of working and ready to retire, so what’s stopping you?

Maybe you can’t afford it yet. Or perhaps you don’t want to stop working because you enjoy it. You want more time to dedicate to your family or hobbies, but aren’t quite ready to give your job up and retire. So, regardless of reason, you keep working.

The Good

But working forever isn’t the only option. There’s another way to ease out of the workforce—phased retirement.

Not sure what that means? Investopedia defines phased retirement as including “a broad range of employment arrangements that allow an employee who is approaching retirement age to continue working with a reduced workload, and eventually transition from full-time work to full-time retirement.”

In other words, phased retirement allows you to work in a part-time capacity for a certain time period before you start full-time retirement. You get to keep working for longer, while employers get the benefit of you passing on your knowledge and experience before heading off to retirement.

Sounds enticing, right?

The Bad

A study published by the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, as reported by Forbes, notes that 77% of employers believe many of their employees want to keep on working post-retirement. Forty-seven percent think employees would like to do some sort of phased retirement. The issue?

Only 31% of those same employers actually allow that shift to a phased retirement, and only 27% are okay with employees taking on jobs that are less stressful or demanding to make retirement easier.

The Solution

If you want to keep working and embrace retirement, there is still a solution through staffing companies like Express Employment Professionals.

You don’t have to pay anything to benefit from Express. All you need to do is pick up the phone and call a local office or register online. Let your employment specialist know your work availability and they’ll find you part-time positions that allow you to phase into retirement at your own pace.

For more in our retirement series, check out these helpful blogs:

Retirement: Happy 40th Birthday 401(K)

Beginner’s Guide to Retirement

Job Searching Past Retirement Age

Three Tips for Getting Your Retirement Started Off Right

Do you plan on retiring? If so, will you retire outright or opt for a phased approach? Let us know in the comments section below!

Poll: What Type of on the Job Training Do You Prefer?

A new job can be stressful. You’re learning new concepts and systems, all while trying to remember your co-workers’ names.

That’s why it’s so important to have some sort of new employee training in place. And even once you’ve gone from new to not so new, continuous training is still needed.

However, each one of us is different, and training that works for one person might not be ideal for another.

What’s your preferred type of on-the-job training?

Thanks for voting in our poll! Is there a type of training you don’t like? If so, let us know in the comments section below.