The New Look of Temporary Work

There’s been a huge shift in the way companies do business today as staffing services have become a more important part of business and hiring strategies. Since the great recession, U.S. staffing firms have created more jobs than any other industry and are expected to grow faster and add more new jobs in the next decade, according to American Staffing Association (ASA). Business owners are increasingly using temporary and contract staffing  to help them quickly react to changing market conditions.

This change in hiring preference can be seen in data from Express Employment Professionals, who conducted a survey of 665 employers throughout the U.S. and Canada and found that many planned on adding temporary workers in the third quarter, especially in the commercial and light industrial sectors.

Should You Consider Temporary Work?

Staffing agencies are allowing businesses the flexibility to expand and decrease their workforce to meet demand. Like employers, workers are also seeing the benefits of flexible employment. According to a recent story by National Public Radio, temporary employment is a good way to get your foot in the door with a company. Contingent workers also have the freedom to travel and work in different fields. Working on a temporary basis for different employers allows you an opportunity to increase your skill set, network, and have flexibility in your work life. Because of this freedom, more workers are using temporary work to stay effective in their specific fields. By working in different environments, social settings and businesses, workers have to adapt their specific skills and training to fit in the ever-changing company cultures. This is one reason temporary workers are becoming more effective and experienced in the workplace.

Another trend in this industry is that staffing employees are working for firms longer than ever before. The staffing industry has lately seen an increase in tenure compared to previous years. While employers watch for signs of growth, they are keeping contract workers for extended periods. Workers are seeing this as a great way to potentially be hired on full time with companies later. A recent study by ASA found that when the economy is growing at a normal rate, 53% of staffing employees who remain in the workforce bridge to full-time employment. This is why temporary work could be a great choice for you. It provides you with more opportunities while giving employers a first-hand look at your potential to do well in a company.

In the next 10 years, the U.S. staffing industry is expected to grow faster and add more new jobs than nearly any other industry, according to ASA. And to solidify its proper place, the BLS believes the demand for temporary help will generate a significant amount of employment growth during this next decade. The staffing industry is growing and becoming a more vital aspect of the business environment, and temporary workers are on the front end leading the change.

Have you ever tried temporary work? Let us know in the comments section below!

 

Poll: What Part of the Job Interview Process Do You Need Help With?

Here at Movin’ On Up, it’s our goal to help you find a job and career you’ll love. Accomplishing that means acing your interviews.

Is there any part of the interview process you’d like help with? Something you’ve always wanted to know but never had an opportunity to ask? Now’s your chance!

Let us know about any topics you’d like to hear about, and we’ll feature the most topics responses in a future blog post.

Let us know by voting in our poll!

Is Your Relationship with Your Boss on the Rocks?

Group projects don’t end after high school. As adults, we call it work. Karen grew up, and now she’s a department manager.  Like Jerry, some coworkers are undependable. And like Karen, some managers are less than great. It gets even harder to perform well when you suspect your manager might have it out for you.

But how can you really know whether your manager has a problem with you?

They Micromanage You

Maybe it’s constantly checking in on you or scheduling private meetings every day. They don’t seem to believe you when you say you have a deadline covered. Whatever it is, they’re not doing it to anybody else on the team. And that’s a problem.

You’ll probably never really know the reason. Maybe you made a bad impression on your first day, or the last person to hold the position was a friend of your boss. It could even be something in your background or social history.

How do you fix that? By doing a self-analysis. Look at your accomplishments and behavior. Check your career development plan. Are you doing anything offensive or untoward? Did your boss previously approach you about a performance problem you still haven’t dealt with?

If you can’t find anything, politely approach your boss about it. Ask them if there’s anything you’re doing wrong. Note specifically how you are being treated differently.

They’re Short with You

If your boss doesn’t make any effort to engage with you, something is wrong. You try to ask for their assistance on a project and they only give yes or no answers.

For whatever reason, they don’t want to talk to you. Maybe they don’t find your work satisfactory or don’t see you as worth their time.

As soon as you can, engage in a conversation. Don’t let it fester. Ask them why it is they refuse to engage with you. It could be because they expect you to handle your responsibilities on your own, or it could be a personal issue. You won’t know unless you ask.

They Don’t Give You Credit for Your Work

If you’re doing your job well, you can expect to be given more responsibilities. That’s how you move up in your career. However, a boss that has less than friendly feelings for you might be tempted to take credit for your accomplishments.

Start to take note of your accomplishments; write down how you achieved or completed projects. Bring this information to your manager, and let them know that you are proud of your work and would like to be recognized for it. If they listen to you and you’re able to work with them, great!

However, if your boss refuses to listen to what you have to say, regardless of reason, you may need to go to their manager and let them know about the situation. If the situation still doesn’t improve, it may be time to start looking for a new job with a great boss. 

Have you ever had trouble with a bad boss? How did you handle the situation? Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

Interviews and Your Personality Type

Are you an introvert or an extrovert?

We’ve all heard it before. Be assertive and social in an interview. Show that you want the job and are easy to talk to. You want to show how great it would be to work with you, and how valuable your sense of teamwork is.

However, what do you do if you’re an introvert? You would love to come off as talkative and social, but that’s just not who you are.

It turns out that your personality type heavily affects how you approach an interview. You want to cater to your strengths and cover your weaknesses. As such, introverts and extroverts both need to approach interviews differently.

Introverts

An introvert, per the Merriam-Webster dictionary, is “one whose personality is characterized by introversion; broadly: a reserved or shy person.”

An introvert doesn’t hate people—he or she just doesn’t enjoy being the center of attention. Introverts recharge their batteries by being alone, and sometimes can only handle social situations for a short amount of time.

How are you supposed to act in an interview? By focusing on your goals and preparing. Most introverts are critical thinkers—they spend more time alone, and thus more time in their own mind. Use this time to anticipate all the questions an interviewer might ask, and to develop an action plan. If improvising in the moment isn’t your strength, simply prepare a suitable response for every possible situation.

In the actual interview, rely on your preparation. If a question comes up you didn’t prepare for, don’t be afraid to ask for a moment to reflect on the question. An interview is not a race—you don’t have to answer as quickly as possible to show you’re the right person for the job.

Extroverts

Merriam-Webster notes that an extrovert is “one whose personality is characterized by extroversion; broadly: a gregarious and unreserved person.” So, someone who likes to talk, and isn’t afraid to state their opinion. Although it might seem like interviews would be a breeze for people like this, that’s not always the case.

Extroverted applicants need to be especially wary of oversharing or taking over the interview. Your answer to a question should never exceed three minutes. When asked about your overall experience and interest in the job, have a prepared speech planned. Standard questions (where do you see yourself in (blank) years, tell me about a time….), should be answered in 90 seconds or less.

Be aware of body language and the personality type of your interviewer. If your answers and their questions are flowing rhythmically, you’re probably dealing with another extrovert. That’s more in your wheelhouse. However, if they’re taking a bit of time to process your answers and taking detailed notes, you might be dealing with an introvert. Take that to heart, and consider your words more carefully. Speak slowly and succinctly. Give them time to process what you’re saying. Know when to speak, and when not to.

It’s important to note that your personality type lies on a spectrum. Some people are extroverted introverts, while others are introverted extroverts. Know yourself, and adapt your own unique personality to the interview process.

How has your personality type affected your interview style? Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

 

Why You Need a Career Development Plan

Going into the job search blind is a bad idea. Lack of preparation will result in an unfocused job search. You don’t want to spend hours searching job websites and applying for everything in sight that meets your payment requirements.

Instead, consider creating a career development plan. A career development plan is a document wherein you list your goals (both short- and long-term) as they relate to your current and future jobs. You then connect those goals with the accomplishments and milestones required to reach them.

Adapt this plan to your job search. The first goal on your plan should be to find a job. What do you need to accomplish that goal? How many resumes do you need to submit each day? Should you take classes at a nearby tech school or online?

Job searching is much easier once you have an idea of what you want and the types of jobs and milestones required to get there. And once you do find employment, the plan allows you to track your progress towards your ultimate career goals.

Still not convinced writing a career development plan is worth the effort? Here’s why it is.

It allows you to celebrate small victories

If you write a goal down, you become accountable to that goal. “I hope I send in five resumes today” becomes “I have to send in five resumes today to meet my goal.” And when you do meet that goal, you’ll feel a sense of pride and accomplishment. Checking things off a list always feels good, right? That’s because you have proof that you moved the needle that much closer toward achieving your goals.

You’ll know what you want

We all need to work to make money—that’s the main goal. However, ideally, you’ll eventually find a job you enjoy. Figuring out where you want your career to go allows you to be more passionate about your job search. Instead of being depressed about your life circumstances and unsure of how you got here, you’ll be able to look directly to your career development plan to see what needs to be done to reach your goals.

You’ll identify what you’re doing wrong

If all your goals are reasonable and you’re still not meeting them, it means something needs to change. Unless you’re dealing with a sick relative or other recent personal issue, odds are you’re approaching your job search or career the wrong way. Perhaps you’re spending too much time surfing online when you should be applying to jobs, or maybe you keep putting off joining a professional group or other organization that allows you to network. If you’re employed, it could be something small like taking lunch breaks that are too long or being too afraid to speak up in meetings. Whatever the reason, having a career development plan allows you to know when you’re off track. After that, it’s easier to identify the problem areas and fix them.

Do you have a career development plan? Why or why not? Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

 

Do You Suffer from the Winter Blues?

There may be more at play

In the United States, many of us are currently experiencing one of the coldest winters on record. With cloudy days becoming the norm and sunny scenes still weeks away, it’s understandable if you’re feeling low.

However, if your bad feelings are starting to heavily impact your job search, it might be possible that something more serious is going on. Maybe you’ve started to snap at your friends, or keep sleeping through your alarm clock. You never really feel awake—not even a third cup of coffee helps. You might be suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).

Look no further than the infographic below (provided by BetterHelp.com) for the major SAD signs. If any of these symptoms sound familiar, get in touch with your doctor to discuss ways to combat the disorder.

Poll: What Career Goals Will You Accomplish in 2018?

It’s January of 2018, which means an opportunity for a whole year of professional accomplishments. Deciding what goals you want to achieve now and creating a plan to get there will ensure you meet them.

Whether you choose to focus on getting a promotion or more interviews, we want to hear about your goals!

Let us know by voting in our poll!