Tag Archives: pay

Poll: What Is the Key Factor That Contributes to Your Job Satisfaction?

Job Seeking and Career Advice PollThe beginning of a new year is a great time to renew your focus on important goals, whether they are personal or professional. From losing weight to saving money, many people will create resolutions and develop plans to stick with them this year. Now that 2016 has begun, your job search efforts may be a renewed priority and you may find yourself applying to more jobs and landing more interviews.

If you plan to focus on your job search this year, it’s important to recognize and understand the factors that contribute to your job satisfaction so you know the job you’re trying to get is the right one for you. We want to know what those key factors are in your life.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

What’s the Difference Between an Apprenticeship and Internship?

apprenticeship_vs_internship_webIf you want to gain work experience while you’re still in school or right after graduation, you’ve probably looked into an internship or apprenticeship.

Both internships and apprenticeships can offer entry-level experience in your field of choice, but they operate in different ways. If you’re looking for one of these opportunities, you may be wondering what the difference is between an internship and an apprenticeship.

In short, internships allow you to learn in a work environment without pay or with minimal pay in order to gain experience. An apprenticeship is formal employment that trains you on a specific skill set while on the job.

So, how do you know which one is right for you? Take a look at each option in greater detail below.

Internships
Internships are usually a type of temporary work that last from a few weeks to several months. Internships are available in both public and private companies and nonprofits. Most people who choose to take an internship are seeking experience in a particular role or industry.

This type of employment is great for people who want to see a specific career in action before committing to it and those who want to gain experience that can benefit their future career. At its heart, an internship is an educational tool, not a training program.

Apprenticeships
What sets apprenticeships apart from internships is that an apprenticeship is an actual training program inside of a job. Apprenticeships usually employ people and teach them a specific set of skills needed in a particular career field.

Often, you will sign a contract with an employer to learn these skills, which can be a mix of formal experience, on-the-job training, and classroom work. You’ll also work toward requirements or a certification program, and if you pass, you then have the skills and formal qualifications to work a specific job.

These types of programs are common for careers like electricians, manufacturing, construction, and more.

Another difference between apprenticeships and internships are the salaries. Many internships are unpaid, while apprenticeships usually pay a salary. For an apprenticeship, the pay generally increases as you move through the training.

Choosing Your Career Path
Ultimately, choosing between an apprenticeship or an internship depends on the career path you want to pursue and what you are trying to gain.

If you want to stay in a specific industry and you are confident with your career path, an apprenticeship may be your best bet. However, if you are looking to boost your resume and experience or are trying out different positions, internships may offer what you need most.

Have you had an internship or apprenticeship? Did it work well for you? Share your experiences with us in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

When it’s Okay to Ask About Pay

ask_about_pay_webIf the world were perfect, hunger would be eradicated, chocolate wouldn’t have calories, and you could go in to every job knowing exactly how much you’re going to get offered. Unfortunately, the world is not perfect. So, how do you find out a job’s salary when you’re in an interview?

Depending on the company, the salary range might be posted in the ad. However, these numbers are usually “commensurate to experience,” meaning companies want to evaluate candidates’ work history before offering a hard number. This is not uncommon. Don’t go into an interview expecting the exact number that is listed, because nine times out of 10 you won’t be offered that.

If the job description doesn’t include a salary range, you’ll want to research what a typical salary for that position might be before the interview. This will give you an idea of how much the employer might be willing to offer.  There are several websites available out there that can help you accomplish this.  What range you fall into is determined by your education and experience, the size of the company, as well as where you live. Pay for a job can vary widely depending on location. Companies want to make sure they are getting the most qualified individual and are willing to pay for that experience.

At some point in the hiring process, you might be asked about your salary expectations. If this happens in the early stages of the interview process, try to deflect. Show the people you are interviewing with that money isn’t your first priority—because when it comes down to it, you are working with people on projects. Focus on finding out more about the job itself, because there will be plenty of time to discuss dollars and cents down the road.

In general, it’s best to let the employer bring up salary. In many circles, it’s considered gauche to ask about salary upfront. Sure, you could work it in to the conversation, but you may risk putting them off in the process. According to experts, it’s best to wait for the potential employer to bring up the topic of salary—and it will be brought up. We all work to make money, so whenever the salary discussion comes up, figure out what salary you want, and then ask for a little more to allow room for compromise.

This is where your salary research will pay off—by having a competitive wage ready, you’ll not only feel prepared and confident, but they will appreciate that you did your research. If you aren’t comfortable with naming a number, use key words and phrases like the following:

  • “I’m very excited to work with you, and trust you will offer a fair and competitive salary.”
  • “I would like a salary comparable to my experience and value.”
  • “Money is important, but there are other topics that are relevant that we should discuss. Could we revisit this question later, after we discuss the company and the position more?”
  • “Until I know more about the position and benefits, it’s difficult to give you a hard number.”

If you can, avoid naming an exact figure.  You might be short-changing yourself.

Remember, it isn’t just the salary that counts. There are other perks and benefits to working with an organization that should be considered—such as 401(k), insurance, vacation, and health benefits. Remember to get the big picture from whomever you’re interviewing with—it isn’t always about the salary.

Do you have any tips for asking about pay? If so, leave your tips in the comments below!

 

What Workers Want: Poll

MOV_POLL-ICON

As we approach the holiday season, many companies are deciding how to show appreciation to their employees this year. From cash bonuses to holiday parties, the ways employers compensate, or don’t compensate, their employees’ hard work varies. We want to know how you wish your employer, or future employer, showed appreciation to employees this time of year.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

 

Cashing Your Paycheck Could Be Costing You

Cashing Paycheck_April2014Everyone loves pay day. It’s a great feeling to see your hours of hard work result in a paycheck. But, there’s a chance you’re not pocketing as much of your earned money as you could be. It all boils down to your bank account, or, to be more specific, your lack of a bank account.

The Cost of Cash
US News reported, “According to the FDIC, 28.3% of U.S. households either don’t have bank accounts or rely on alternative channels for financial services, such as check-cashing.” Whether by choice or not, many people and households depend on major retailers, check-cashing stores, or the check-issuing banks to cash their paychecks to access their money. And, as US News pointed out, this service comes at a price, ranging from a flat-fee to a percentage of the check amount.

Specifically, that price, according to NBC News, which highlighted a new study from Tufts University, is about $200 billion a year. To narrow it down, that means “someone without a bank account pays an average of $3.66 more a month than someone with a bank account,” and is “four times more likely to pay fees to access their own money.”

Go Electronic
The best way to avoid losing your hard-earned money is to use any electronic funds transfer (EFT) options your workplace offers. Most employers, offer some form of EFT, whether direct deposit or paycard, because it saves them the time and cost associated with paper checks. And, EFT can save you money too. NBC News reported that “getting paid electronically is often significantly cheaper than receiving a paper check” when there are fees for cashing a check without an account.

With so many people living paycheck to paycheck and struggling to save money for emergencies or retirement, it’s more important than ever to manage where your money is going. Find out if your banking method is costing you money, and if EFT could put a few dollars back in your pocket. You shouldn’t have to pay to get access to your money.

What have you found to be most effective for accessing your paycheck? Tell us about it in the comments section.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

written by: Ashlie Turley

Your Job: Purpose Vs. Pay

Purpose_Vs_Pay_WebAccording to the 2013 Work Stress Survey, 83% of Americans reported being stressed about at least one thing at work, with the number one factor being low pay. With workplace stress on the rise, have you asked yourself – “am I working for the pay or the purpose?”

Working for Pay
Payscale, a research provider on salary and career topics, dove into how meaningful people found their work versus what they get paid. The highest paying and most meaningful rated job is a dermatologist. But what about those jobs that have high pay with low meaning? Business Insider released a summary of the Payscale report focusing on jobs that pay well, but aren’t changing the world. That list included job titles for senior and corporate counsel, fashion designer, credit/collections director, and network architect. This list proves that high pay doesn’t always lead to high job satisfaction.

If pay is the most common factor in workplace stress, can workplace stress be alleviated just with higher pay? The highest earners in the Work Stress Survey cited their number one work stress was unreasonable workload. But if your work was doing something you truly love and find purpose in, more work might really just be more fun, right? It’s something to think about.

Working for Purpose
What about jobs with low pay but high satisfaction? Topping that list are sign language interpreter, worship coordinator, two jobs in the water treatment field – plant operator and plant laboratory technician, and soldier. This article also clarifies that high meaning doesn’t necessarily correlate with job satisfaction. Meaningful and fulfilling work can be hard, but is there a payout in knowing your work is creating a better world?

Another reason people may turn to careers of purpose is to have work that creates something. Generations ago, work resulted in a product, whether it was manufacturing or farming, you could actually see and touch your end product. A recent article in Parade stated that Etsy’s (an online craft marketplace) one million sellers will have sales of more than $1 billion this year. Individuals have turned to crafting as a relaxing hobby and have also found a way to make money off it.

The Balance
Finding the perfect balance of pay and purpose might be the definition of a dream job. Simply, what is your goal in finding employment? Your career goal may center on purpose if you are at a point in your life where financial responsibilities are lower. On the other side, if financial responsibilities are your driving motivation, it’s probably more important how much your paycheck is – not necessarily what you did to earn it.

For some individuals, a career of purpose is being noted as a career built for the second act of their business life. The Halftime organization “helps individuals find their passion to help lead a more significant second half,” as explored last month in a story on CBS DFW.

What about you? Are you trying to find your passion early in your career or are you working for a paycheck now with hope that at some point you can chart a new course? Share your thoughts in our comments section below.

Career Possibilities Without College Degrees

jobs without college degreeThere’s this little technology company, you’ve probably heard of it, called Microsoft. It only has 90,000 employees and a revenue of more than $70 billion in 2011. This wildly successful company was founded by Bill Gates, who was the richest man in the world during the early 2000s. There’s actually something very interesting about Bill Gates that many people don’t know.

He never graduated from college.

While he is an extreme example of success without a college degree, there are things you can do to achieve your career goals without attending a university. Here are some hints to help guide you when looking for a job without a degree.

Start at the Bottom and Give it Time
Sometimes slow and steady wins the race, especially if you’re just starting out and have very little experience. Consider industries that let you work into management positions without a college degree like real estate, aviation, sales, construction, or transportation.

The entry-level jobs in these industries may not be the highest paying jobs compared to jobs requiring a college degree, but if you demonstrate hard work ethics and grow in experience, you could move into higher paying jobs. It won’t be overnight, but it’s obtainable.

It’s All Who You Know
Employers are much more likely to promote hire someone they know and are familiar with compared to a stranger. That’s why it’s important to connect with people inside and outside your desired industry. If employers are familiar with your accomplishments and abilities, when possible, they will be willing to look past college degree requirements.

Make sure your resume and cover letter are in top shape. Include a phrase like,“did not obtain a bachelor’s degree” or something to that extent on your resume so it will get picked up by applicant tracking systems’ keyword searches. That way, you’ll have a better chance of talking to a decision maker.

To help get your foot in the door, call employers and ask to schedule an informative interviews to find out what skills and abilities are most needed in your desired industry. You will improve your interviewing skills, make strong connections, and develop a stronger career plan.

Expand Your Skills
To help develop your skills and experience, consider taking an apprenticeship, freelancing, volunteering, or working through a staffing agency. These are excellent ways to learn real skills and experience from highly skilled mentors to position you to move up in your career without a college degree.

Do some research to see if you need any specialized certification or skills to be qualified to work in your desired field. Those are great questions to ask during an informational interview or when being trained by someone. Some certifications might not be necessary to work, but can help you develop and grow your skills so you can market yourself better.

There are several different paths you can take to achieve your career goals. You just have to find the one that works best for you. Hopefully, you can use one of these suggestions above and find real success in your job search. If you want to learn about some great jobs that don’t require a college education, check out this list to help you get started. What are some of your success stories of finding a job without a degree?