Tag Archives: poll

Does Online or In-Person Networking Work Best? The Surprising Results of Poll

With so much focus on social networking and the job search, we wanted to know in our latest poll what you think works best – in person or online networking.

The results of the poll – posted and shared online – may be surprising.

A total of 477 readers responded to the poll, which asked “Which is most effective?”

A huge majority thought in-person networking works best.

Here’s how the results came back:

  • 21.4 % selected “Networking online.”
  • 78.6 % selected “Networking in person.”

But, as our readers shared, that’s not to say that networking online isn’t important. Their comments reinforced the value of balancing both in-person and online networking.

Networking Balance is Key

Reader Chuck Rice responded, “I don't know that you can do one or the other. Face to face will always continue to be important, however online networking is better for staying in touch and discussing a variety of topics to a larger audience. I've found that seeing a post or message from someone in the middle of my business day causes me to act immediately, as long as I've built some face to face relationship.”

Other commentators shared the value of networking online to expand your relationships beyond where time and travel costs allow with traditional networking.

When it comes to networking, it’s clear that balance is key. With all the focus and attention on social media and technology these days, don’t underestimate the value of meeting people face-to-face. Use both in-person and online networking tactics to get the best of both options. Putting all your eggs in one networking basket could limit your opportunities, so carefully plan time for each type of networking in your professional life.

What are your thoughts? Can you afford to rely on just one type of networking these days to build your personal brand, advance in your career, and find great opportunities?

Poll Indicates Optimism About Economy

The year of 2009 is behind us, and 2010 is charging full steam ahead. As the economy continues to show signs of improvement, economists are predicting it will only be a matter of time before businesses and jobs start ramping up again. In January, a total of 652 people responded to our survey, “Are You Optimistic About the Job Market?

Of those who took the survey, 53.4% said they are optimistic about the job market this year, while 46.6% said they are not.

These numbers are an improvement over a similar poll that we took in March 2009. On that survey, more than 1,200 readers voted. Of those who took the survey, only 38.8% said they were optimistic about the economy over the next six months while 61.2% said they were not optimistic.

Overall, the outlook on the economy is looking up. Do you have any additional thoughts about the economy over the next six months? Share your thoughts here.

Will 2010 Be the Return of the Job Hop?

Throughout much of 2009, the career world was marked by unrelentingly high unemployment rates, continued layoffs, and negative job reports. Employees everywhere were focused on keeping the job they had – no matter how good or bad, and making the best of whatever situation they found themselves in. At the end of December 2008, job value was so high that 71% of nearly 1,500 readers said they’d take a paycut to save their job.

This year, as the economy shows continued signs of recovery and the job market begins to turn around, low employee engagement is more than just an anecdote to stir up the boardroom. It’s a reality that employers should already be taking into consideration, because it means that as soon as jobs start to open up, turnover costs may begin to soar. 

In fact, our latest monthly poll showed that people are already thinking about greener pastures. We asked our readers if they’d consider job hopping for the right opportunity in 2010. A total of 817 people responded, with an overwhelming 82% saying yes, they’d job hop this year.

It’s true that you don’t have to job hop to improve your career, especially in normal circumstances. And, some people felt they were now actually better off career-wise than they were before the recession.

But, it’s also apparent that employment uncertainty from the past year or two has created the perfect storm for job hopping when the job market opens back up. Employers will increase recruiting seasoned professionals to build back diminished workforce numbers and add expertise, and employed professionals may move from a passive job search into an aggressive pattern, seeking to increase salary, gain responsibility, or simply have a change of pace. And all of this will only work to increase the competition in an already competitive job market.

So, keep your eye out on this trend in 2010, and share your thoughts about job hopping, the 2010 job market, and employee engagement with us in the comments section.

Poll Says Degrees Still Valuable, but Readers Share Frustrations

In our July monthly poll, we asked readers if they thought that this year, with high unemployment rates and a highly competitive job market, higher education is still worth the cost.

The results were mixed, but 50.3% of readers said that yes, they did think higher education is still valuable in this economy. At the same time, 32.9% of readers said that they did not think higher education is worth the cost, and 16.8% responded that they were not sure.

Comments on the poll illustrated that mixed feelings run deep when it comes to the value of higher education, especially in this economy. Some shared frustration, bitterness, and even anger about attaining college and advanced degrees but still struggling in a difficult job market.

Others offered insight into the value of work experience. One shared, “I just wouldn't recommend going from undergraduate to graduate school without any real work experience. It will be even harder in my opinion when you graduate.”

Another said, “A degree doesn't provide anyone with a guarantee. It does tend to open more doors than those who don't have a degree, but that is about it.”

So, as the summer wraps up and universities prep to welcome a new wave of students, will you be joining them? If so, are you planning to work to gain experience while you go to school? Are you looking for a different way to learn about your industry? Share your higher education plans for this upcoming semester in our comments section.

This Year, Is Higher Education Worth the Cost?

Summer may be at its peak, but just around the corner, another school year waits. Not just for children to return to class from summer vacation, but for a growing number of people in America, from the unemployed to those with newly minted degrees. 

This year, a rising number of unemployed Americans are returning to school to improve their knowledge and skills in an increasingly tough job market. In fact, many community colleges reporting their largest enrollment spikes ever attribute the increase to the need to meet the demands of a highly competitive job market.

To cope with the monetary strain of higher education, many high school graduates are simply opting for a low tuition option such as in-state or community colleges, rather than ivy league, gold sticker institutions.

Many new college grads, who faced a dreary job outlook upon their recent graduation, are opting to go straight into grad school, fearing uncertain immediate employment future. In fact, the National Association of Colleges and Employers reported that 26% of new grads planned to go on to graduate school, up from 24% in 2008 and 20% in 2007.

So, with all this emphasis on going back to school, we want to know what you think. Is it worth it to get a college or graduate degree in this recession? Let us know by voting in our poll below.

 
Are you struggling with the decision of whether or not to enroll in higher education? Looking to increase your skills, or hoping a degree will help you earn a higher paycheck? Share your thoughts on higher education in our comments section.

Second Jobs are Still Hot this Summer, New Poll Shows

At the beginning of this month, we asked workers if they were looking for a second job as the summer’s seasonal employment opportunities started to open up.

Of almost 1,600 respondents, 56% reported that they are indeed looking for a second job this summer – because they need the extra cash – up from 41% who reported looking for a second job to generate more income when we asked the question last November.

As economists continue to predict that the recession is nearing its end, these results reflect that financially, workers are still feeling the financial strain of the economy.

This poll also offers an interesting insight on the current unemployment situation. In this month’s poll, 24% of respondents said they are unemployed and looking for a position, down from 27% in the November poll.

When asked, “Are you looking for a second job?” 1,595 readers responded, and 56.7% said they were looking for a second job to generate more income, 9.1% said they wanted a second job to get their foot in the door at a new company, 6% said they don’t have time to work a second job, 3.5% said they didn’t need a second job because their finances were okay, and 24% said they are unemployed and currently looking for a position.

Have you found a second job this summer? Is it worth the stress of managing a hectic schedule? Share your thoughts and comments on working a second job in the comments section.