Tag Archives: workplace

What Type of Boss Do You Have?

And what does that mean for you, as an employee?

Throughout our lives, we’ve all worked for a variety of bosses. Some are compassionate and inspire us to excel in a number of ways. Others are independent leaders who have a tendency to be more assertive.

Daniel Goleman, of the Harvard Business School Press, outlines six basic boss types, illustrated below in an infographic by the Quid Corner, an online financial resource center. Although we all have our own ideal management type, the graphic also outlines the optimal ways to get along with each type of boss. So even if your manager isn’t naturally compatible with you, you’ll have some idea of how best to get along with them.

 

The Results Are In: How Would You Describe Your Ideal Workplace?

statistics 3Finding the right company culture to align with your personality can be a big part of your engagement and success. With the many workplace types and countless personalities of job seekers, we wanted to know what Movin’ On Up readers look for in an ideal workplace.

The Results
According to our poll, the ideal workplace for most respondents is one that implements a casual dress code (18%), is relaxed (15%), and is on the smaller side (15%) in terms of company size. Additionally, approximately 13% of voters prefer a quiet workplace, while another 12% would prefer a remote office.

Companies that are fast-paced, large in size, or require a professional dress code were among the less desirable workplace attributes at 9%, 8%, and 6% respectively. The fewest Movin’ On Up readers selected “loud” as the word to describe their ideal workplace, garnering only 2% of votes.
Readers were also able to select the “other” option and provide their own responses. Of the 3% who selected that option, responses included:

  • Mid-size company
  • Flexible work schedule/control own hours
  • “Employee-first” culture
  • Caring
  • Routine
  • Friendly atmosphere

What else do you look for in an ideal workplace?  Let us know in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Millennial Monday: The Workplace Millennials Want

Millennial Monday LogoExpress Employment Professionals recently teamed up with the School of Media and Strategic Communications at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, OK, to conduct research about Millennials and their attitudes toward the American Dream. Also known as “Gen Y,” Millennials were born between 1979 and 1995 and currently make up 30% of the population. As they enter the workforce and establish career paths, it’s important to understand the motives and desires behind this robust generation. To help you get to know “Gen Y,” Movin’ On Up is bringing you an eight-week series titled “Millennial Monday.”

In this week’s installment of “Millennial Monday,” Express and OSU students surveyed Millennials, the majority of whom are working full or part time, to paint a picture of the generation’s view of the perfect workplace.

A Trendy Culture
For every generation, the image of a perfect workplace is different. As our society changes and technology increases, newer generations look for flexible and remote opportunities, work-life balance, and the right culture fit. For Millennials, a company’s culture can be the deciding factor when it comes to accepting a job offer.

When asked to rank the aspects of a company in order of importance, survey respondents chose “social media presence” as the most important, followed closely by “latest technology.” Also ranked were “speed and timeliness” and “friendly and interactive customer service.”

Elements of An Ideal Workplace
When it comes to what makes up an ideal workplace, respondents selected, in the following order:

  • Treated fairly
  • Involved with the community
  • Informal
  • Small groups
  • Warm temperatures
  • Formal
  • Large groups
  • Cold temperatures

Pay or Passion
As far as picking between a job with high pay and a job that they’re passionate about, Millennials know what they want. According to the survey, an overwhelming majority of Millennials (80%) would rather have a job that they’re passionate about. For the remaining 20%, pay is more important to job satisfaction.

A Better Boss
According to the survey, the qualities Millennials value in a boss are, in the following order:

  • Reasonable expectations
  • Relatable
  • Punctual
  • Laid back
  • Someone you consider a friend
  • Stern

Best Time for Productivity
At what point in the day do you perform at your highest level? If you’re like the majority of Millennials (37%), you work best from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Other peak performance times include 12 to 3 p.m. (24%) and 7 p.m. or later (16%). The worst time for productivity, according to the survey results, is before 7 a.m. (2%).

The Effects of Natural Light
When asked if they perform better in environments with a high amount of natural light, the majority of respondents (59%) reported that they do. For 5% of people, natural light does not help them perform better, followed by an additional 35% who don’t think the amount of natural light in their workplace affects their job performance.

The Importance of Fitness
Many businesses realize there are numerous benefits to promoting a healthy culture in the workplace, from offering wellness initiatives to gym memberships. Placing importance on fitness can serve companies well with the younger generations. In fact, 67% of surveyed Millennials agree that they are more likely to be attracted to a company that has a highly active culture.

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Do you agree with the survey results? What does your ideal workplace look like? Share with us in the comments section below!

Keep checking Movin’ On Up every Monday for more insight on this important generation.

Miss a week? Click the links below to check out previous topics in our series.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Poll: How Would You Describe Your Ideal Workplace?

MOV_POLL-ICONAt some point, you’ve likely been asked about your dream job, but what about your dream workplace? According to Forbes, when your personality lines up with company culture, you’re more likely to be engaged and successful. Finding the right work environment can play a key role in determining your overall job satisfaction and productivity.

Because definitions of the perfect workplace vary from person to person, unique to personality and work style, we want to know what yours would look like.

Do you think finding the right workplace is important for job satisfaction? Let us know in the comments section below.

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Work-Life Balance – Is It Possible?

worklife_balance_webThere’s an art to balancing work life with personal life, and it’s not easy for everyone. In fact, a recent study from Good Technology revealed that finding balance for workers has either become less of a priority or more of a struggle. The study found that an alarming 80% of people continue working after they leave the office each day. This includes half of respondents who check their email in bed, 78% who check it before 8 a.m., and half who believe they have no choice but to work after hours.

According to the study, the average amount of work occurring outside normal working hours is seven hours per week, almost a full day. This equates to nearly 30 hours a month or an additional 365 hours per year. At a salary of $10 an hour, that’s $3,650 in unpaid wages for hours worked.

By far, the biggest culprit for working outside of office hours is email. According to the survey, 57% of respondents checked email on family outings, 38% checked it at the dinner table, and 40% checked it after 10 p.m. Perhaps the most alarming figure, 69% reported that they can’t go to sleep without checking their email.

Women in the Workplace
According to Forbes, women are particularly prone to lacking work-life balance. Data from McKinsey research reveals that women hold 53% of corporate entry-level jobs, a number that drops to 37% for mid-management roles and 26% for vice presidents. Further, men are twice as likely as women to advance through career stages, which McKinsey Research suggests means men are more likely than women to be in positions that allow them less workplace burnout. In fact, men are 25% more likely to take breaks throughout the day for personal activities, 7% more likely to take a walk, 5% more likely to go out to lunch, and 35% more likely to take breaks in order to relax.

A Shift for the Future?
Brian & Company recently released a study that suggests the tides may be turning. According to their research, work-life balance is no longer just a women’s issue. When asked if they plan to prioritize non-work commitments over career progression, 50% of men and 51% of women currently in an MBA program said they do. Similarly, 42% of men and 40% of women reported the biggest obstacle to reaching their career goals is keeping some balance in their lives.

Since these MBA students report anxiety over derailing their careers for the sake of their families and personal lives, it may be time to rethink work culture. Julie Coffman, author of the report, points out that 80% of women and nearly 70% of men reported that they intend to have a joint parenting role in their family. “That starts to raise the question: Is it really feasible to parent and have a big job?” she said.

Time to Take Action
The struggle with work-life balance in the workplace can be remedied if all parties are willing to take action. Schools should offer more courses or programs that address the challenges of having a family and a powerful career, and companies should shift the way they reward employees. Harvard economist Claudia Goldin suggests that instead of rewarding those who work long hours outside of the office, employers should develop flexible career models that allow people to work their way to the top via different paths. Additionally, instead of rewarding tangible accomplishments, they should recognize those who work behind the scenes or go above and beyond to make the workplace enjoyable.

Employees can also do their part to make work-life balance less of a career stumbling block. The following steps may help those who experience workplace burnout:

  • Prioritize. Decide what matters most to you and work with your manager to keep it a priority. Work hard and give your all in the workplace, but don’t let that affect the things that are important to you – like family dinners or your children’s extracurricular activities.
  • Take care of yourself. Healthy habits improve how effective you are at work and help you combat the build-up of stress. Exercising regularly can help you blow off steam, and your lunch break may be the perfect time to do so.
  • Set expectations. Know what is expected of you after hours and on the weekend so you are prepared when a project, phone call, or email sneaks up on you. If you set the expectation with your boss that he or she will only email you after hours if it’s extremely important, you’ll know that action needs to be taken if your receive an email on the weekend.
  • Log off. Breaks are important, especially if you’re not on the clock. If you’re spending time with friends, are at a family event, or are enjoying a vacation, don’t check your emails or use your phone. Prep your team ahead of time so the expectations are set and a plan is in place for your work to be accomplished while you’re away.

How do you unplug from the office? Let us know in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

 

5 Important Lessons Learned From a First Job

lessons_from_first_job_2_webYour first job is a milestone. You get a real paycheck, you start a career, and you start on the grand adventure called life. It will be a learning experience. You may not get the salary of your dreams, and it may feel daunting to learn the ropes, but your first job can teach you many things. Whether you are serving up burgers or starting your first office job, learning these five things can make a significant impact, and can help you move from a first job to a successful career.

1. Your job is to make your manager’s life easier. Until you are CEO, your job is to serve your boss. Make sure you support your manager and take on extra projects when possible to show you are willing to go above and beyond. Most importantly, don’t go to your boss with problems. Go with solutions. If you have a situation you need to resolve, brainstorm possible solutions before you visit with your boss.

2. Attitude, manners, and people skills matter. Establishing that you’re a positive employee is incredibly important, especially early on in your role. If you show that you’re driven by solutions, others will look to you for answers and support. If you bring negative energy into the office, you’ll only bring others down and may end up hurting your career in the process. It may sound simple, but don’t forget to use your manners. “Please” and “thank you” can go a very long way in building stronger relationships.

3. Always look for new ways to learn. “Be a sponge and have a thirst for knowledge,” says business coach Tonya Monsef Bunger. Make an effort to learn new skills, take on training opportunities, and develop your hobbies. When you learn something new, you bring even more positive qualities to your skill set, which in turn can help boost your resume.

4. Don’t get discouraged. In any job, problems will arise. Issues are often unavoidable, but how you deal with them can make or break your job performance. It’s okay to feel like things are going less than perfect, but don’t dwell on the challenges. Instead, stay focused and positive, and try to offer solutions to the problem.

5. Know when it’s time to move on. Your first job may not be your dream job. You may not be making much money, you may have tasks you don’t like. All of that is normal. But, if your job is making you miserable and you face every day with stress and anxiety, it may be time to move on. Whether you’re unhappy in your job, you need more income, or it’s just time for a change, make sure you know how to move on.

Most likely, your first job is not going to be your last job. If an opportunity presents itself, go for it. The only way you can grow in your career is to take those opportunities.

What did you learn from your first job? Do you have any words of wisdom for others starting their first job? Share your thoughts in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.

Happiness and a Good Job – You Can Have Both

happiness_at_work_webWhat are the keys to happiness in the workplace? While that answer may be different for each person, there are some factors that lead to a more satisfied workplace. According to a Gallup poll, 24% of the global workforce is actively disengaged with their jobs. Additionally, 63% of the worldwide workforce is “checked out, sleepwalking through their day, or putting time but not energy or passion into their work.” This leaves only 13% of people who are happy at work.

People who are happy and satisfied with their personal lives are also more likely to be happy with their jobs. So, how can you make your job something you enjoy? Check out the information below to help you find happiness in the workplace.

Know the Facts
To understand the current state of happiness in the workplace, take a look at these statistics:

  • Forbes states that the people most satisfied with their jobs include database administrators, quality assurance engineers, executive assistants, and recruiters.
  • According to Happify, things that affect our satisfaction at work vary for men and women. For men, it’s compensation and interest in the work. For women, it’s flexibility, workload, advancement, and the people at work.
  • When it comes to Millennials, those born between 1980 and the mid-2000s, 64% say they would choose a job they love that pays $40,000 over a boring job that pays $100,000 a year.
  • 69% of bosses are satisfied with their jobs, while only 48% of workers are. Furthermore, 39% of self-employed workers are satisfied with their jobs, compared with 28% of people who work for others.

Find Your Happiness
Thankfully, there are ways you can find happiness in the workplace. According to author Alexander Kjerulf, the keys to staying happy at work are accomplishing something that’s meaningful to you, knowing your job is important, and being appreciated. You can help others find satisfaction with their work by celebrating their successes, lending a helping hand, and offering recognition for jobs well done.

Think about what you do and try to find the meaning in it. If you work in a retail environment, you may find satisfaction through helping provide people with items they need. Or if you’re an administrative assistant, you may find meaning in the fact that you’re directly influencing the success of others. When you engage in work that feels meaningful to you, you’ll likely experience higher rates of motivation and satisfaction as a result.

The job you currently have may not be the one you want to have forever, and that’s okay. Remember to use the time you have at your job to make important accomplishments and connections with others that can benefit you in your next job.

At work, every day is not going to be easy. When you’re stuck with a challenging situation in the workplace, believe in yourself instead of getting stressed. Think back to a similar task you accomplished and remember that you are capable of accomplishing this one too. Your positivity can impact your work. In fact, according to Shawn Achor’s book, The Happiness Advantage¸ entry-level accountants who believed they could accomplish what they set out to do ended up with the best job performance ratings.

Making friends at work can also help you stay happy on the job. Studies suggest that if you have three or more good friends at work, you are 96% more likely to be satisfied with your life. To nurture friendly relationships, take some time to greet a co-worker you don’t know very well and practice random acts of kindness in the workplace.

How do you stay happy on the job? Share your tips in the comments section below!

Movin’ On Up is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals.